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  1. #1
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    Arrow How to read Polaris Ficht EMM trouble codes using Simple LED tool

    How to read Polaris Ficht EMM trouble codes using a simple LED tool, without special software or a computer

    I have not yet checked this on every Polaris Ficht EMM version, but so far it has worked on the 1999 and 2000 Genesis EMM, 2002 Virage TXi and Virage i, and the 2004 MSX 140 EMM, which I happened to have on hand for testing.

    That said, there is no problem with trying this on any Polaris Ficht EMM, just do not get confused about the connectors and pin numbers you need to work with.

    What follows is based on the 1999 Polaris Genesis FFI service manual, which has some useful Ficht diagnostic information that is missing from the later year manuals.

    The Polaris Ficht EMM has the ability to blink a special service LED, and you can count out the trouble codes that are stored inside the EMM.

    You can also clear those trouble codes, and test or re-test the engine. If the problem happens again, you will be able to tell, as the trouble codes will be stored again for you to read out.

    Clearing EMM Service Codes using jumper or TPS cycling
    Note: the EMM may automatically clear old service codes after 15 running hours, if the same code has not re-occurred during that time.
    Last edited by K447; 08-24-2010 at 10:28 AM.


  2. #2
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    Arrow How to make the Ficht EMM Service Power jumper (PN 2872456)

    The Polaris diagnostic documents assume you have the official Polaris diagnostic connectors and such. You can make your own exact equivalent connectors, but you can also use short pieces of wire and locally sourced electronic parts to do the same job.

    Here are the parts involved

    A) Polaris Ficht EMM Service Power jumper (PN 2872456)

    Made using a Deutsch DT04-08P connector
    It simply has a wire loop that connects pin 1 to pin 7. That's all it does.
    First two photos

    It can be substituted with a short U-shaped section of standard 14 AWG solid copper wire, commonly used for household wiring (often called household 14-2 wire).

    I used the white wire from a short segment of 14-3 NMD-90 cable, which has three colored wires inside - Red, White, Black.
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    Last edited by K447; 10-12-2010 at 08:17 PM.

  3. #3
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    How to make the Ficht EMM Service diagnostic connectors (PN 2872455)

    B) Next is the Polaris Ficht Service Code Light (PN 2872455)

    Made using a Deutsch DT04-12P connector, along with a few pins (example 16 AWG size 0460-202-16).
    It has a red LED plus a resistor in series between pins 2 and 4. LED polarity must be wired so it lights when pin 2 has positive voltage.

    I made up a fancy one with a second Yellow LED for the overheat sensor, and an MFD security by-pass jumper, so I could use it for several different purposes. Shown in photos one and two.

    A simple LED Service code light can be made without the Deutsch connector, just using two pieces of 14 AWG wire, an LED, and a resistor.

    I used colored wires, but you just need to mark which wire will go to pin 2, and which will connect to pin 4.
    Photo sequence below shows assembly of an example Simple LED tool, including polarity testing with a 9 volt battery.

    It is better if the LED is medium or high brightness type, to make it easier to see, but in a pinch almost any LED will do. Do not use a 'blinking or flashing' LED part, just a standard red LED is what you need.

    Radio Shack 276-307 or 276-309 are examples, but there are hundreds of LED part numbers that would work just as well. Any electronics parts supplier will have LED that can be used for this. It simply needs to light up from 12 volt DC power flowing through a series connected resistor.

    I used a 330 ohm resistor (color code orange-orange-brown), which allows for moderate brightness.
    Radio Shack 271-1315 is one source, but again these are widely available.

    The exact resistance is not critical - anything between 100 ohms and 500 ohms will probably work. The smaller the resistor ohms, the brighter the LED can be. Too little ohms, and the LED may burn out
    Note: You must use an LED, not a 12 volt light bulb or some other voltage tester. A light bulb will draw too much current and might blow the fuse for the display, or even possibly damage the EMM circuitry that drives the LED for the MFI/NGI display.

    Which reminds me - now would be a good time to check the fuse for the display. Make sure it is the correct Amp rating, and is otherwise in good shape (no corrosion, proper voltages at the pins on the display connector.

    Correct fuse for the displays on 2002-2004 Virage, Genesis and MSX fuel injected models is 2 Amp Mini blade fuse.


    For the 1999-2001 Virage and Genesis fuel injected models it is a 1/4 Amp cylinder type fuse.

    Solder the parts together as shown.

    Any electronic 'component level' repair shop should be able make this up in a few minutes.

    I used heat shrink tubing to insulate the parts and provide some toughness to the finished piece.

    Make sure the wires must not short together.

    If you don't have heat shrink tubing, use drinking straw sections or something similar to ensure that nothing will break or short, then tape it.

    You can make the wires longer, which may make it easier to position the LED where you can easily see it while working at the engine. Just make sure you don't pull the LED and resistor apart in use - they are somewhat fragile.

    Another option is to use Radio Shack part 276-0270, which is an LED with an internal resistor. Solder short sections of #14 wire to each wire end, and insulate the joints.
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    Last edited by K447; 07-12-2015 at 09:03 AM. Reason: Added warning about not usign a light bulb -use LED only

  4. #4
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    Now you hook up the diagnostic connectors.

    1) The Service Code Light 2872455, or your simple LED with two wires, connects to the wire harness connector for the MFI display.
    Note: This is not the 12-pin connector at the EMM, it is the 12-pin connector found behind the actual MFI display.

    Unplug the MFI display (Genesis or Virage), and plug the LED into the wire harness connector for the MFI.

    The positive LED wire goes into pin 2 (Red/Purple wire, Red/White on some models)), and the negative LED wire goes into pin 4 (Tan/Orange wire).

    Make sure you get the pin numbers correct!
    They are printed very small on the back edge of the connector, or just check the wire colors.
    Note: MSX 140 12-pin NGI display connector is hard to get at. You can still plug the diagnostic LED in, but the 12-pin connector is tucked up tightly into the hood. Pin 2 is Red/White instead of Red/Purple.

    An alternate LED connection location on the MSX 140 is one of the two six pin connectors just below the hood hinge. Find the Red/White and Tan/Orange wires. Unplug that connector.

    The 14 AWG wire that fits the 12-pin connectors is too fat for this connector - do not force it into the holes. Modify the LED with 16 or 18 AWG solid wire, which should fit into the smaller rectangular holes without damaging the little metal pin sockets.
    2) Next you unplug the 8 pin connector from the EMM. It has four black wires, two White/Red wires, and two Red/Purple wires.

    Plug in the EMM Service Power jumper connector 2872456, or your simple U-shaped wire loop, into the wire harness connector (not the EMM itself).

    Note the small 'index tab' on one corner of the 8-pin connector (circled in RED in the photo). That should help you orient the wire jumper correctly.

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    You can plug the wire loop into any of the following pin combinations, they will all work the same;
    1 & 7 (Links Red/Purple to White/Red)
    2 & 8 (Links Red/Purple to White/Red)
    1 & 2 (Links Red/Purple to White/Red)
    7 & 8 (Links Red/Purple to White/Red)

    What this does is link the Red/Purple battery power wire to the White/Red EMM power wire. This provides 12 volt power to the EMM while the engine is not running.

    Note: The engine will not be able to start while this connector is unplugged from the EMM.


    3) Unplug the three pin TPS connector at the rear of the throttle body. Use a small jumper wire to link the two pins in the TPS wire harness connector that do not have a black wire.

    This provides a maximum voltage TPS signal back to the EMM. This is well beyond the normal signal for 100% throttle position, and this tells the EMM to activate the LED code display function.

    An alternative is to remove the TPS from the throttle body, or plug in a spare TPS. Position and hold the TPS shaft at maximum rotation, which will again provide a signal beyond what is possible with the TPS mounted on the throttle body.


    4) Now insert the lanyard into the handlebar switch.


    If you have done everything right, the EMM will wake up, and within a few seconds the Service Code LED will begin blinking.

    If the LED does not begin blinking, review all the steps. Make sure all connections are as described, and that your LED is working, and will light up with the correct polarity.
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    Last edited by K447; 03-10-2011 at 10:31 PM.

  5. #5
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    Arrow Reading the Ficht EMM diagnostic LED code flashes

    If the diagnostic LED is now blinking, you can read the EMM Service Codes.

    The EMM will start the pattern with a long 3 second LED on, followed by quicker flashes. Count the flashes. When the flashes pause, record that digit. Then count the flashes for the next digit, write that down.

    This is the first two digit service code.

    The EMM will then signal the next service code, which you count and record. This will continue until all service codes have been flashed out.

    Then the EMM will pause, light the LED for 3 seconds, and repeat the code display pattern.

    It will continue to do this until you remove the lanyard.

    A Service Code of 11 means System OK - no stored codes.

    The linked video shows a EMM with three service codes logged - 83, 81 and 82



    You will see the long flash begin at the ten second mark, followed by 8 flashes, a pause, then 3 flashes. That is code 83.

    Another 8 flashes, then 1 - code 81

    Next is 8 flashes, then 2 - code 82

    Pause, long flash, then eight, then 3 - code 83 again. And so on...

    Note: There is a three digit code 144, which applies only to the two cylinder fuel injected engines;
    Service Code 144 indicates a problem with the water injection solenoid
    Last edited by K447; 01-21-2013 at 10:42 PM. Reason: EMM Service Code 144 has three digits...

  6. #6

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    Hey THANKS!

    This worked great on a '02 Virage I, Now just gotta fix it and hope it takes care of the problems.

    I'm a little confused about part of the very last blinking though.

    Codes I was given.

    43: High Coolant temp
    25: High EMM temp
    14: TPS out of range (am I right to assume this will trip testing this way)


    What I'm confused about.

    It went through the codes and I sat and watched blinking for a couple minutes counting.

    Definitly 43, 25, and 14 but after 14 I'm getting 4 flashes, almost like it's flashing me 144???

    Maybe I misread something towards the end of your post.

  7. #7
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    Arrow Ficht EMM Service code 144 - WATER INJECTION SOLENOID CIRCUIT MALFUNCTION

    Quote Originally Posted by RedlineR6 View Post
    ...'02 Virage I...

    I'm a little confused about part of the very last blinking though.

    Codes I was given.

    43: High Coolant temp
    25: High EMM temp
    14...

    It went through the codes and I sat and watched blinking for a couple minutes counting.

    Definitely 43, 25, and 14 but after 14 I'm getting 4 flashes, almost like it's flashing me 144???

    Maybe I misread something towards the end of your post.
    There is one three digit code that is mentioned in the service code PDF attached to the first post;
    144 WATER INJECTION SOLENOID CIRCUIT MALFUNCTION

    The water injection solenoid is unique to the two cylinder fuel injected engines. It is not critical to engine operation, and they do fail. Be sure to cap off the hose connection and manifold hole if you remove it.

    I don't know what exactly the EMM senses in order to trigger the 144 code, but my guess would be the solenoid coil continuity.

    If you remove the solenoid, the EMM may always have the 144 code, unless you replace the solenoid with a resistor. Let me know if you figure out what ohm resistor works without overloading the EMM driver circuit for the water injection solenoid.

    Edit: The exact resistance value of the resistor is not critical. It must be over about 400 ohms to minimize power/heat. In my testing I found a range of 470 ohms to 1200 ohms (or even higher) worked just fine. A 1/2 watt resistor works just fine.

    How to delete water injection solenoid 4010768 from Ficht fuel injected Virage i (2 cylinder 2002-2004)
    Last edited by K447; 01-21-2013 at 10:50 PM.

  8. #8
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    Arrow Overheated EMM - code 25

    Quote Originally Posted by RedlineR6 View Post
    ...Codes I was given.

    43: High Coolant temp (exhaust water jacket temp sensor)
    25: High EMM temp (EMM internal temperature sensor)...
    Sounds like the machine was run without water cooling, either clogged water intake, or run out of the water.

    If the EMM gets too hot, it can cook the electronics. Sometimes the cooked EMM electronics fail, but do not generate codes for everything that is now broken.

    The Digital Wrench software can tell you exactly how hot the EMM internals got. The LED will just tell you it got hot enough to trigger the code.

    A cooked EMM can result (among other things) in low injector voltage, weak or failed injector driver(s), weak or missing spark on one or more cylinders, or confused EMM operation (or non-operation).

    If you clear the codes, you can see if they recur. If the codes return, they are considered Hard codes, which means the EMM thinks the problem is still happening.

  9. #9

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    Ah, that makes sense. 144, not 14. Thanks again, didn't see the 144 code listed.

    Ooh, sounds like I could have alot of testing on my hands.

    Ski won't start as it sits, atleast, hasn't for me.

    Supposedly runs good for 5-10 minutes, then dies like the tether is pulled.

    150 lbs both holes. getting spark, and that's as far as i've gone, other than getting the codes.


    I'm thinking something got hot enough that now it's losing resistance when warm. Gonna start by inspecting the cooling system, and hopefully finding a clog.

    Edit: I'm assuming this system won't shut itself down, but would rather limp. So I think I have a heat related electronics failure.

  10. #10

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    Think I may have found the or one source of the problem.........what damage it has done so far, I don't know.

    The small coolant line that runs to the back and out the exhaust was laid under the battery, and therefore pinched closed when the battery was tightened.

    This line comes from a T that goes to the injector solenoid and the EMM.

    I'm hoping I can just reset the codes, make sure the line flows, and maybe take care of the problem, but I'm doubting it.

    But still, what's causing the engine overheat sensor to trip if I don't have another plugged coolant line. hmmmmmmmmmmmm


    Edit: Also might add, these damn clamps blow! Gonna be expensive replacing all of them I remove.

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