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  1. #1
    Canadian Beaver Inspector jkindt's Avatar
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    Removing Impeller

    Is it possible to remove the impeller without the specialized tool? I want to replace the bearings. I pulled the cone off and lots of water came out, so I think there may be more between the bearings. If it is not possible, does anyone want to sell an impeller tool?


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Impeller tools are not expensive. Check eBay. Recently discussed in another thread...

    It is torque spec'ed at 100 ft-lbs, so it will take some torque to get the impeller loose again.

    Some guys have used a pipe wrench on the drive shaft, but you risk tearing up the surface of the drive shaft.

    When you removed the tail cone, did the water come from the pockets around the perimeter of the plastic cone, or from the center area?

    The actual tail cone water seal is the O-ring around the inside of the stator, where the round portion of the cone slides in. The cones have pockets around the perimeter,a dn water does get in there, and that is not a problem.

    Do the impeller bearings have a grinding feel, or any side to side slop, when you turn the impeller?

  3. #3
    aprilia-ryan's Avatar
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    When I tore down the genesis I got I used a ford wrench I had.Just a smooth jawed flat surfced monkey wrench,every job calls it something else.I used the same to disconnect the drive shaft coupler from the engine.

  4. #4
    Canadian Beaver Inspector jkindt's Avatar
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    The water was inside the cone, lots of water. The grease inside looked like a strawberry milkshake. When I spin the impeller, it makes a rumbly sound.

    What if I put the PTO coupler on the other end of the driveshaft with a big wrench on it to hold it, that should work. Or would that screw up my coupler?

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkindt View Post
    The water was inside the cone, lots of water. The grease inside looked like a strawberry milkshake. When I spin the impeller, it makes a rumbly sound.

    What if I put the PTO coupler on the other end of the driveshaft with a big wrench on it to hold it, that should work. Or would that screw up my coupler?
    Definitely time to replace those stator bearings and seals.

    Does your coupler have a large molded rubber center, or is it made from solid metal?

    The solid metal couplers would work as you suggest, using the drive shaft in between. Don't damage the impeller blades while you are wrestling with it.

    The rubber bonded couplers might be OK, but might have more torque 'give' than you want for wrenching with.

  6. #6
    Bing-A-Ding-Ding-Ding, Brrrrrap! Brrrrrrrrrap!!! Polaris_Nut#1's Avatar
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    make sure your cone isn't cracked. The water got in there somehow.

  7. #7
    Canadian Beaver Inspector jkindt's Avatar
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    Well that was easy! (For once!!!) I took the pto coupler, clamped it down on the flat edges, put the shaft in there, put the impeller on the other end and used a wrench to unbolt the stub shaft. Didn't even need to struggle too bad, just spun off clean! No damage to any part at all!

    Now I am committed though. The thing had more water in it, brown water, rusty water. I pulled the two seals and found layers of rust between them. Time for new seals and bearings for this one.

  8. #8
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Jet Pump Maintenance and Service

    While you have the drive shaft out, consider replacing the seals in the through-hull bearing;



    There are different versions of the through-hull bearing
    Early units with crimped ends can not be repaired, but they can be directly replaced with the newer style assembly (1996-2004, except MSX)
    Click here for a list of parts sources

    The seals tend to wear more than the brass bushing, so you may not need to change the bushing, unless it is worn.
    Replacement seals can be purchased from any Polaris OEM parts source, or generic seals may be installed.


    Generic Drive Shaft Seal carrier seal part# 8702 (Two required, or three?)


    www.ebearings.com SKF Rawhide 8702
    Shaft 0.875
    Bore 1.499
    OD 1.503
    Width 0.25

  9. #9
    Canadian Beaver Inspector jkindt's Avatar
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    I already got the seals out of the through-hull bearing. I just need to find new ones now.

  10. #10
    ’95 SL 750, How to Do, a Jet Pump Bearing/Seal Replacement



    Replacing the bearings and seals is pretty straightforward job if you have the proper tools.
    After removing the pump assy from the ski, disassemble far enough to get the rear cone off. Put it in a vise, and using the special tool (about $10.00) remove the impeller, (cc/w).

    You can now punch out the bearings and seals by using about a 6-8 inch long punch (using a good size hammer). There is ample room to move the spacer around, it seems easier to go through the middle of it vs. the side of it to drive them out.

    Next de-grease and clean up the housing.

    Put it in an oven for about 45 minutes set at 212 degrees F.

    While this is heating, put the bearings in a freezer for about the same length of time.

    Now it is ready to assemble. The bearings will almost slide in with hand pressure; you might have to nudge with a hammer/socket (pushing on the outer race). Don’t forget to install the spacer.

    When both bearings are in let it cool for a while. Insert the first forward seal (socket/hammer on out side edges of seal) pack marine grease in the cavity (between the seals) and install the next seal.

    Installing the impeller requires the special tool and a torque wrench that go to 100 foot-pounds.

    Assemble the rest with all new seals.

    Total cost for this project was around $100.00(using all Polaris seals/bearings)

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