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  1. #1
    Canadian Swamp King's Avatar
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    2010 Log & Poo MSRP's

    GTXLTD260........$16,499USD - $3,000 MORE IN CANADA
    RXTiS260 ............14,999 "
    RXTX260 .............14,199 "
    No RXPX260 in 2010, only RXP215

    FZR ...................$13,199 - $4,000. MORE IN CANADA
    FZS .....................13,199 "
    FXSHO CRUISER .....13,799 "

    I'm thinkin' POO for $1K less screwin'. And yes, I told the companies how I feel about it.
    I'm urging all Canucklehead riders to bitch to the companies, especially BRP where SeaDoos should be at par for us.


  2. #2
    GOT BOOST? Dockside's Avatar
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    I hear ya. I saved almost $5,000 buying in the states. ive sent seadoo emails befor but they could care less. Funny how i have to go to the states to save money on a ski thats made in canada. Im going to write brp a letter saying im canadian and how much i like my canada build pwc blah blah blah and what a great deal i found on one in michigan.
    BRP WAKE UP!!!!

  3. #3
    tempest.runner's Avatar
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    It would be nice to hear why BRP justifies the cost being more in the US... BRP needs to be more in touch with their consumers. Posting stupid survey's online isn't the only way to communicate with it's customers.

  4. #4
    Moderator boataddict's Avatar
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    Frankly they don't care.
    The consumers meaning YOU still buy them and as long as you do things will not change.

  5. #5
    Moderator boataddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sportsterme View Post
    I hear ya. I saved almost $5,000 buying in the states.
    Really? Your ski would be worth 8-10k here max. Did you buy it for 5k?

  6. #6
    Canadian Swamp King's Avatar
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    This Should Be In The BS Bin

    PS You may have seen this editorial in Cycle Canada.

    LOONIE LUNACY

    By Costa Mouzouris

    In 2006, new motorcycle sales in Canada topped at 82,022, compared with
    1,022,332 in the United States. More than twice as many machines were sold
    in the state of California alone (166,280 in 2005) than in all of Canada.
    Why this comparison? Because my inbox is stuffed with messages sent by
    readers demanding that Canadian prices be adjusted to reflect our stronger
    dollar.
    Retail price disparity between the two countries varies between 15 and 35
    per cent. Enough to drive buyers south of the border in search of a deal.
    However. retail pricing is not based on exchange rates alone, and believing
    that we should be paying the same price as Americans is shortsighted. The
    US has buying power that we Just can't match, and every new motorcycle
    bought south of the border boosts US numbers, while contributing nothing to
    Canadian sales.
    Most Canadian motorcycle distributors are sepa­rate entitles from the
    manufacturers they represent. and they buy motorcycles in the currency of
    the manufacturer's country of origin. Major brands traded in US dollars
    include Ducati, where Canadian bikes are bought from the US distributor (a
    Canadian distributor is slated to begin operations sometime next year). and
    Harley, where Deeley Imports deals directly with Milwaukee. As such,
    Canadian pricing of these makes (which has dropped significantly in the
    past couple of years) better reflects the sliding US dollar-more so with
    Harley, as those bikes originate in the US and are not bought from Italy in
    euros Bear 111 mind that on the global market we're dealing with a slightly
    stronger loonie and a much weaker US greenback. Also, exchange rates
    between buyer and seller are determined when orders are placed and are
    revised quarterly, or less frequently, depending on the manufacturer.
    Transportation fees are incorporated into a motor­cycle's cost, and they
    are naturally lower in the US because of volume. Bikes coming into Canada
    still have to cross the country, and with fewer machines being shipped,
    per-unit transport costs are higher. Also adding slightly to the cost are
    speedometers that must read in kilometers and bilingual owner's manuals and
    labeling. Canadian distributors are not bound by law to honour warranties
    on vehicles not originating in this country safety recalls are mandatory),
    and any such warranty work is covered on the goodwill of each dis­tributor
    and is meant to accommodate travelers. Some Canadian distributors can claim
    all or part of such warranty costs from the manufacturer, while others are
    on their own.
    From experience, I can say that no dealer appreci­ates performing warranty
    work, whether they sold the bike or not Manufacturers have a flat rate for
    warranty repairs, which is below the actual time it takes to fix the bike,
    and at an hourly rate lower than that posted by a service department. Now
    Imagine a local dealer that has a potential customer interested in a new
    bike, yet the dealer can't match the price of the US dealer 50 miles away
    (to even come close to the US price a Canadian retailer would have to sell
    below cost), That customer then buys the bike in the US, while the Canadian
    dealer is left with an unsold machine, and is paying monthly interest on
    it. making the bike more expensive to keep by the day, Then, sometime
    later, that same customer comes in with an engine knock in his
    American-bought bike and expects-even demands-a no-cost repair under
    warranty. Now, if I were that dealer (and I say this not as the editor of a
    motorcycle magazine who risks being accused of siding with the
    manufacturers, but as someone who spent two decades working in dealerships,
    some of them struggling to survive), I'd kick them out. Fortun­ately for
    across-the-border shoppers, most distributors I and dealers are more
    forgiving, and depending on the make, the bike might be repaired. So the
    Canadian dealer loses the sale of the new bike and makes next to nothing
    fixing it. which may cause prices, in the future, to go up-if you don't
    make money you need to raise prices or you go out of business, For most of
    the last decade, Canadians have been paying less for motorcycles than
    anywhere else in the world. It's only this latest downward slide of the
    American dol­lar that makes US bikes more appealing to Canadians. A Honda
    919 retailing in Canada for $11,399 would cost $8.475 if bought in the
    States when factoring in the exchange rate. and not counting import-related
    costs. In the UK that same bike would cost $12,210, and in Australia, where
    the Canadian dollar is experiencing an even more favourable exchange rate
    than in the US, the 919 would still set you back $12,660.
    Pricing in the US (the biggest market in the world for larger
    displacement motorcycles) is lower than the worldwide average, and due to
    our proximity to our neighbours, many buyers will take advantage of this.
    Importing a motorcycle from the US, though benefi­cial in the short-term to
    a consumer, is detrimental long-term to the Canadian motorcycle Industry.
    And ultimately it's the consumer who risks losing the most if Canadian
    distributors and dealers are expected to compete on an unfair playing
    field.


    Cycle CANADA . November/December

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOATADDICT View Post
    Really? Your ski would be worth 8-10k here max. Did you buy it for 5k?
    up here as an example, dealers sell a new RXP-X for $16,199 plus your 13% tax and the other pre delivery inspection charges, making is out the door for around $18,500, so yes, finding a machine for around the 10-11,000 mark would save us $5000, its rediculous.
    I am Canadian and I only buy from the states, Id love to support our market, but money is money, and Id rather have more of it in my pocket. Buffalo is a 2 hour drive and I make it often....in my truck that I bought from Arizona!!

  8. #8
    GOT BOOST? Dockside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOATADDICT View Post
    Really? Your ski would be worth 8-10k here max. Did you buy it for 5k?

    When i bought it during the summer the cheapest i found was a new 2008 for $13,000 with no trailer pluse tax and all the other bullshit. Where can i buy a NEW rxp for 8-10k cause everyone around here wants that for used ski that are older then 06. I priced then out,for a new 2008 rxp at lockhearts it was $14,000 with trailer + taxs and all the extra bullshit. I had cash in hand told them to meet the price of the dealer in Michigan and all i got was NO sorry that as low as were going. including trailer im into mine for under 11......

  9. #9
    GOT BOOST? Dockside's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by BOATADDICT View Post
    Frankly they don't care.
    The consumers meaning YOU still buy them and as long as you do things will not change.
    Only reason i bought a seadoo was i wanted a small 2 seater and well the rxp in the only true 2 seater on the market. If yamaha made a small 2 seater or i was in the market for a 3 seater i most likley would not of bought seadoo.

  10. #10
    GOT BOOST? Dockside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian Swamp King View Post
    PS You may have seen this editorial in Cycle Canada.

    LOONIE LUNACY

    By Costa Mouzouris

    In 2006, new motorcycle sales in Canada topped at 82,022, compared with
    1,022,332 in the United States. More than twice as many machines were sold
    in the state of California alone (166,280 in 2005) than in all of Canada.
    Why this comparison? Because my inbox is stuffed with messages sent by
    readers demanding that Canadian prices be adjusted to reflect our stronger
    dollar.
    Retail price disparity between the two countries varies between 15 and 35
    per cent. Enough to drive buyers south of the border in search of a deal.
    However. retail pricing is not based on exchange rates alone, and believing
    that we should be paying the same price as Americans is shortsighted. The
    US has buying power that we Just can't match, and every new motorcycle
    bought south of the border boosts US numbers, while contributing nothing to
    Canadian sales.
    Most Canadian motorcycle distributors are sepa­rate entitles from the
    manufacturers they represent. and they buy motorcycles in the currency of
    the manufacturer's country of origin. Major brands traded in US dollars
    include Ducati, where Canadian bikes are bought from the US distributor (a
    Canadian distributor is slated to begin operations sometime next year). and
    Harley, where Deeley Imports deals directly with Milwaukee. As such,
    Canadian pricing of these makes (which has dropped significantly in the
    past couple of years) better reflects the sliding US dollar-more so with
    Harley, as those bikes originate in the US and are not bought from Italy in
    euros Bear 111 mind that on the global market we're dealing with a slightly
    stronger loonie and a much weaker US greenback. Also, exchange rates
    between buyer and seller are determined when orders are placed and are
    revised quarterly, or less frequently, depending on the manufacturer.
    Transportation fees are incorporated into a motor­cycle's cost, and they
    are naturally lower in the US because of volume. Bikes coming into Canada
    still have to cross the country, and with fewer machines being shipped,
    per-unit transport costs are higher. Also adding slightly to the cost are
    speedometers that must read in kilometers and bilingual owner's manuals and
    labeling. Canadian distributors are not bound by law to honour warranties
    on vehicles not originating in this country safety recalls are mandatory),
    and any such warranty work is covered on the goodwill of each dis­tributor
    and is meant to accommodate travelers. Some Canadian distributors can claim
    all or part of such warranty costs from the manufacturer, while others are
    on their own.
    From experience, I can say that no dealer appreci­ates performing warranty
    work, whether they sold the bike or not Manufacturers have a flat rate for
    warranty repairs, which is below the actual time it takes to fix the bike,
    and at an hourly rate lower than that posted by a service department. Now
    Imagine a local dealer that has a potential customer interested in a new
    bike, yet the dealer can't match the price of the US dealer 50 miles away
    (to even come close to the US price a Canadian retailer would have to sell
    below cost), That customer then buys the bike in the US, while the Canadian
    dealer is left with an unsold machine, and is paying monthly interest on
    it. making the bike more expensive to keep by the day, Then, sometime
    later, that same customer comes in with an engine knock in his
    American-bought bike and expects-even demands-a no-cost repair under
    warranty. Now, if I were that dealer (and I say this not as the editor of a
    motorcycle magazine who risks being accused of siding with the
    manufacturers, but as someone who spent two decades working in dealerships,
    some of them struggling to survive), I'd kick them out. Fortun­ately for
    across-the-border shoppers, most distributors I and dealers are more
    forgiving, and depending on the make, the bike might be repaired. So the
    Canadian dealer loses the sale of the new bike and makes next to nothing
    fixing it. which may cause prices, in the future, to go up-if you don't
    make money you need to raise prices or you go out of business, For most of
    the last decade, Canadians have been paying less for motorcycles than
    anywhere else in the world. It's only this latest downward slide of the
    American dol­lar that makes US bikes more appealing to Canadians. A Honda
    919 retailing in Canada for $11,399 would cost $8.475 if bought in the
    States when factoring in the exchange rate. and not counting import-related
    costs. In the UK that same bike would cost $12,210, and in Australia, where
    the Canadian dollar is experiencing an even more favourable exchange rate
    than in the US, the 919 would still set you back $12,660.
    Pricing in the US (the biggest market in the world for larger
    displacement motorcycles) is lower than the worldwide average, and due to
    our proximity to our neighbours, many buyers will take advantage of this.
    Importing a motorcycle from the US, though benefi­cial in the short-term to
    a consumer, is detrimental long-term to the Canadian motorcycle Industry.
    And ultimately it's the consumer who risks losing the most if Canadian
    distributors and dealers are expected to compete on an unfair playing
    field.


    Cycle CANADA . November/December
    Long read only read some of it but will read the rest. I want to comment on the exchange rate. I know it doesnt affect pricing BUT my problem is that seadoos are made in canada. So there sold and shipped to the US then i come and buy it bring it back to canada and its still cheaper to buy in the US and even if the us dollar was stronger it would still be cheaper to buy US.

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