Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Powder Springs, Georgia USA jcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    73
    +1
    11

    Precautions for River Riding ???

    I am considering riding on the Coosa River (Alabama and Georgia).

    At some times and places it is moving quite rapidly.

    Has anyone here rode on this river or in a similiar situation?

    What precautions are necessary?

    (I am concerned about the Waverunner getting away from me.)


  2. #2
    83Gator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    St. Amant, LA
    Posts
    6,018
    +1
    304
    Quote Originally Posted by jcat View Post
    I am considering riding on the Coosa River (Alabama and Georgia).

    At some times and places it is moving quite rapidly.

    Has anyone here rode on this river or in a similiar situation?

    What precautions are necessary?

    (I am concerned about the Waverunner getting away from me.)
    I'm not familiar w/either of those two river systems, but I've navigated the ICW during flood conditions: swift water w/ eddies and zero vis. (muddy water). The number 1 danger factor though are sinker logs/trees in the current. Gotta keep an eye out.

  3. #3
    Moderator shawn alladio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Earth, USA, California
    Posts
    2,058
    +1
    7
    Depends upon the flow as suggested.. good points!
    Rivers have a scale of difficulty attached to them, but any flow over 3mph is considered swifwater. Strainers are what are dangerous and not going near low head dams, avoiding shoaling and rocks... just depends and of course personal riding levels and vessel functions.
    If there are any 'warnings' issued for boating traffic, just heed those and take them to heart. Going up current is easier than down stream with the current, speeds increase and hitting an unseen underwater object depends upon visibilty factors as well... river knowledge and local knowledge/flood and debris flow are concerns... and yeah, losing the ski..ferry angle swim to shore and keep your feet up (foot entrapment)...basic rules of safey in rivers....

  4. #4
    speedskixp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    venice fl.
    Posts
    8,117
    +1
    120
    Keep a rope tied to your ski and ready to toss to a buddy if something goes wrong and the ski dies. If the ski stalls in swift current it can take you into the brush and when that happens the ski overturns and you can find yourself in a very dangerous situation.

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,591
    +1
    1,275
    In addition to all the precautions already mentioned, consider your jet pump intake grate.

    Ingesting debris into the pump can take away your thrust immediately. The stock and most aftermarket intake grates have fairly large openings, which makes for an efficient jet pump, but exposed to objects/sticks/rocks getting into the impeller.

    Something the shallow river running jet boats use is an intake grate with narrow openings. A custom Stainless Steel intake grate with narrow slits would reduce the size of things that can get into the pump.

    The idea is that small items are less likely to jam inside the jet pump, allowing you to continue riding. You will have less thrust overall than with a normal grate, but you will have a more reliable jet pump in shallow and debris laden waters.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1030018-1.JPG 
Views:	61 
Size:	77.7 KB 
ID:	188755   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	GrateRock.639x443jpg.JPG 
Views:	79 
Size:	181.9 KB 
ID:	188756   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	H212%20stomp%20grates%20006_sm.jpg 
Views:	75 
Size:	38.3 KB 
ID:	188758   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DWB%20Stomp%20Grate%20002.jpg 
Views:	65 
Size:	44.4 KB 
ID:	188759  

  6. #6
    Powder Springs, Georgia USA jcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    73
    +1
    11
    Well I rode portions of the Coosa River yesterday.

    It is a decent sized river, with lots of wildlife and excellent fishing. I saw some guys hauling in 50+ inch catfish.

    What I learned?

    1. Watch out for large logs.
    2. . . . . SNAKES !!
    3. Limiting speed is definitely a required safety measure.
    4. Limit speed so you don't upset the occasional fisherman
    5. Note landmarks, cause it is easy to get lost.
    6. Being quiet and boating in stealth mode yielded many wildlife sitings.
    7. There are many creeks and tributaries that are interesting to explore (snakes and spiders do hang from trees).

    and it would have been nice to have a partner on another boat. In case one of us had problems, the other could help-out. I was traveling solo, and did experience the feeling of nervousness which was scary but exciting at the same time. Cell phone service was spotty at best.....and river traffic was sparse.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Best section of CT River for extended ride?
    By slug420 in forum Northeast
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-02-2017, 09:42 AM
  2. Official Countdown For Kissimmee River Ride
    By Carlos_33010 in forum Southeast
    Replies: 192
    Last Post: 09-24-2008, 06:44 PM
  3. Dad & I went for a ride today
    By Shibby1485 in forum Sea Doo Open Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-30-2006, 08:34 PM
  4. finally got a chance to go for a ride this weekend
    By mxl16 in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-01-2006, 07:22 PM
  5. How many of you wear a helmet for recreational riding ?
    By Kinchyle in forum Sea Doo Open Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-31-2006, 09:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •