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  1. #1

    Polaris SLH Half-Sunk - Advice?

    Hello,
    So I've been keeping my Polaris SHL at my apartment's boat area, but this area is a sess pool of theives. I get broken into or something stolen in on manner or another about once per month, and the SLH was on their list as bolt cutter marks were showing up on my lock. So, I decided to move it next to my larger boat moored at the Marina.

    I put it in the water and tied it up there, checking it daily to see if it took on any water. It didn't... so I left for about 3-4 days, then I can back it had taken on water. My luck. The fuel tank was empty so the front was totally afloat, and the back had sunk as far as the rope would allow. (About to where the sticker is).

    Anyway, the intake and cylinder heads were not submerged, but the exhaust manifold was right at about there the water line was. I removed the spark plugs and turn the engine over to see if there was water in there, and while water didn't shoot out, water/oil/gas mix does come out, so I am thinking water got in backwards through the exhaust.

    What should I do? Any special advice?


  2. #2
    SPEED KILLS, BUT YOU GET THERE QUICKER Keddano's Avatar
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    Get it running ASAP. Crank without the spark plugs in till it doesn't spew anything out the cyl. Allow starter to cool,do not crank to the point of ruining the starter.Put fresh spark plugs in it and fire it up, Then run it(perferable drive it for a while,you want to totally dry out the crank and any mosture in the case.

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keddano View Post
    Get it running ASAP...
    Absolutely. Get it dried out, and running.

    When you are done riding (to get the engine fully warmed up and dried out), spray a good amount of 2-stroke engine fogging oil into the carb intakes while it is idling. Then shut it down.

    The fogging oil will help protect the crank bearings from further rust.

    Since you are now storing it in a wet environment, consider fogging it every time you are done using it at the end of the day.

    Where did the water come from?

    Perhaps multiple places. With slow leaks, the water will accumulate at the very back of the hull, where it can be hard to notice at first.

    If the hull inside is not clean, it can be harder to see the first signs of water inside the hull.

    My guess is that the drive shaft through-hull seals are old, and need replacing. Not expensive to do.

    While you have the jet pump off, remove the impeller and replace the seals in the front of the stator.

    Check for any signs of water inside the stator bearings. If there is any signs of moisture or rust in the front or rear stator bearings, replace the bearings too. I would suggest just replacing the bearings and seals at the same time.

    Make sure the O-ring inside the back end of the stator is in good shape, or replace with new. Lightly grease with waterproof marine grease before re-assembly.

    Also, replace the old O-rings on both hull drain plugs.

    Make sure the plastic elbow for the bilge siphon hoses is properly mounted up high in the rear of the hull. Also check that the tiny air breather hole in the side of each elbow is clear. Do not enlarge the hole, just make sure it is clear.

    If the bilge siphon hoses are aged, replace them with new. Make sure the replacement hose is thick enough and stiff enough to not collapse over time. The siphon hoses have mild suction in them.

    After that, check every single cooling system hose in the hull. If in doubt, replace the hose.

    Also check that the speedometer pitot hose under the drive shaft is in good condition, and clamped on to the small nipple under there. Replacing that hose would be a good idea.

    Check all the large exhaust hoses. Make sure they are sealed properly. Water generally does not come into the hull or engine through the exhaust, unless the hull is already collecting water and sitting low.

    Consider purchasing a drive on jet-port to lift your PWC out of the water when you are not using it. Cheaper than an engine rebuild, and less worry about future slow leaks.

  4. #4
    SPEED KILLS, BUT YOU GET THERE QUICKER Keddano's Avatar
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    You might want to look into adding a automatic bilge pump,they have a built in float switch to turn it on. As a extra safety item.

  5. #5
    Yeah that was on my to-do list next weekend. Guess I should have moved it up a bit, eh? lol.

    I'm gonig to install:
    - On small on board marine-battery charger with, and just keep it plugged in when it's at the dock.
    - Float Switch for bildge pump
    - GPS tracking device

    I will follow your guys' advice as soon as I get off work today. What do you think the odds are for engine damage/corrosion? This is fresh water, but it could have been in this half submerged state for a day or two before I went to the Marina and noticed. Also, after I floated it, I cranked it with the plugs out for a while to get water out. But had to leave before I would have liked, and there is still some water in there as water, fuel, and oil was misting out of the plug holes.

  6. #6
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highamperage View Post
    ...What do you think the odds are for engine damage/corrosion?

    This is fresh water, but it could have been in this half submerged state for a day or two before I went to the Marina and noticed.

    Also, after I floated it, I cranked it with the plugs out for a while to get water out. But had to leave before I would have liked, and there is still some water in there as water, fuel, and oil was misting out of the plug holes.
    You might have been better off leaving it submerged until you could fully resuscitate the engine.

    Once you get air into the engine, it is the oxygen in the air rusts the steel crank bearings and cylinders. There is oxygen dissolved in the water too which will rust the crank, but less than in the air.

    That is why the instructions are to get the engine dried out, then get it running. The 2-stroke oil mixed into the fuel misting through the running engine re-coats the metal parts. The heat of the running engine dries out the remaining moisture, as does the high RPM under load which blows a large volume of air through the engine.

    At this point, you are going to be VERY lucky if that engine remains usable.

  7. #7
    So, I should expect that it will run for a short while and then a bearing(s) will fail?

  8. #8
    ryandi2's Avatar
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    yes, but as soon as you can, id still clean it out the best you can and run it.. you might get lucky... you might not...

    i hope you do though..

  9. #9
    Hopefully.

    Well, the irritation this causes, while my fault, is going to be added to the pile of irriation I have at the people trying to steal this ski and everything else, since if it wasn't for them I wouldn't have moved it to begin with Then when I meet them, they'll be paying for this too

    Not how I usually think but in this case I think it's appropraite.

    Anyway, I see there are several sites that have entire rebuilt engines for around $700:
    http://www.pwcengine.com/products/Po...lt-Engine.html

    Anyone know of any place to find a rebuild kit?

  10. #10
    rwc297's Avatar
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    sunk ski

    hey i jhad the same issue with my 780 slt it was give to me after being submerged, they hit a dock and wiped out. what i did was take all three plugs out and disconnect the exhaust hose from the water box, then i attached the hose from my wet dry vac to the outlet on top of water box, turned the vac on and cranked it over for a few seconds at a time and the vac helps to remove water. you can also spray fogging oil in cylinders while doing this and it will also be pulled into the engine.
    best of luck,
    rwc297

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