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  1. #1

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    Is it possible to run E85 on the SHO engine with a ecu?

    Using the 1000cc Vipec Map the duty cycle max is 55.3 leaving plenty of room to run E85, was told by a friend that tunes race cars that I just needed to go up like 30% so something like 85% duty cycle which is below 90%.

    Do we have any gasket issues with these engines and E85? Anyone has given it a try?


  2. #2
    hitman's Avatar
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    You'll use a lot more fuel, and the availability may be an issue, but E85 is a hell of a lot cheaper than race gas and is equivalent to an octane rating of about 110 if I'm not mistaken. I have lots of buddies that run it in their cars.

  3. #3
    Whats that whistling noise? jtskier11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitman View Post
    You'll use a lot more fuel, and the availability may be an issue, but E85 is a hell of a lot cheaper than race gas and is equivalent to an octane rating of about 110 if I'm not mistaken. I have lots of buddies that run it in their cars.
    Your right. Lot of guys I know run it in their higher CR/boosted cars with no issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hitman View Post
    You'll use a lot more fuel, and the availability may be an issue, but E85 is a hell of a lot cheaper than race gas and is equivalent to an octane rating of about 110 if I'm not mistaken. I have lots of buddies that run it in their cars.
    That is exactly why I am looking into it at $2.55 a gallon even using more is close to the equivalent of premium gas at $3.20. It is also readily available so as long as you don't need to refuel in the water is not a hassle like race gas, on top of that you can add more timing. The horsepower gains should add at least 2 or 3 miles to any setup.

  5. #5
    krispaintballz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitman View Post
    You'll use a lot more fuel, and the availability may be an issue, but E85 is a hell of a lot cheaper than race gas and is equivalent to an octane rating of about 110 if I'm not mistaken. I have lots of buddies that run it in their cars.
    I ran it last year in my 2 stroke and it was equivalent to 100 octane. I was running 145 lows and 150 highs with the race gas. When I ran the E85 and 114 blend 50:50 I was running a jetting of 185 highs and 160 lows. I also ran a triple pickup with 3 65 p/l fuel pumps just to make sure I had the fuel pressure and flow. I was refueling every half hour. It got annoying quick and stopped doing it. But this is all 2 stroke and dont know if you run in the same problems with a 4 stroke.

  6. #6
    KamikazeGPR's Avatar
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    I didn't know much about E85, so i looked it up on wikipedia. Doesn't seem to be recommended for engines that are not equiped for it, (IE. rubber fuel lines, aluminum fuel rails)

    Here's a few paragraphs from wiki.
    Use in flexible-fuel vehicles

    E-85 ethanol is used in engines modified to accept higher concentrations of ethanol. Such flexible-fuel vehicles (FFV) are designed to run on any mixture of gasoline or ethanol with up to 85% ethanol by volume. There are a few major differences between FFVs and non-FFVs. One is the elimination of bare magnesium,aluminum, and rubber parts in the fuel system. Another is that fuel pumps must be capable of operating with electrically conductive ethanol instead of non-conducting dielectric gasoline fuel. Fuel injection control systems have a wider range of pulse widths to inject approximately 40% more fuel. Stainless steel fuel lines, sometimes lined with plastic, and stainless steel fuel tanks in place of terne fuel tanks are used. In some cases, FFVs use acid-neutralizing motor oil. For vehicles with fuel-tank mounted fuel pumps, additional differences to prevent arcing, as well as flame arrestors positioned in the tank's fill pipe, are also sometimes used.

    Comparisons to regular gasoline

    E85 has an octane rating higher than that of regular gasoline's typical rating of 87, or premium gasoline's 91-93. This allows it to be used in higher compression engines which tend to produce more power per unit of displacement than their gasoline counterparts. The Renewable Fuels Foundation states in its Changes in Gasoline IV manual, "There is no requirement to post octane on an E85 dispenser. If a retailer chooses to post octane, they should be aware that the often cited 105 octane is incorrect. This number was derived by using ethanolís blending octane value in gasoline. This is not the proper way to calculate the octane of E85. Ethanolís true octane value should be used to calculate E85ís octane value. This results in an octane range of 94-96 (R+M)/2. These calculations have been confirmed by actual octane engine tests." [12] One complication is that use of gasoline in an engine with a high enough compression ratio to use E85 efficiently would likely result in catastrophic failure due to engine detonation, as the octane rating of gasoline is not high enough to withstand the greater compression ratios in use in an engine specifically designed to run on E85. Use of E85 in an engine designed specifically for gasoline would result in a loss of the potential efficiency that it is possible to gain with this fuel. Using E85 in a gasoline engine has the drawback of achieving lower fuel economy as more fuel is needed per unit air (stoichiometric fuel ratio) to run the engine in comparison with gasoline. This corresponds to a lower heating value (units of energy per unit mass) for E85 than gasoline. Some vehicles can actually be converted to use E85 despite not being specifically built for it. Because of the lower heating value E85 has a cooler intake charge, which coupled with it's high stability level from it's high octane rating, has also been used as a "power adder" in turbocharged performance vehicles. These modifications have not only resulted in lower GHG emissions, but also resulted in 10-12% horsepower and torque increase at the wheels. Because of it's low price (less than $2.00/gal in some places) and high availability in certain areas people have started to turn to using it in place of the high end race fuels that typically cost over $10.00/gal.

  7. #7
    hitman's Avatar
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    So the octane rating is less than I thought.

  8. #8
    *Quiet Storm* #22gpr's Avatar
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    no its not recommended to be used on boats and watercraft, example fuel lines and fuel tank, our fuel lines are different than automotive also fuel tanks, also the possibilities of water forming in the fuel tank if fuel is left in the tank for a long period of time,alcohol absorbs moisture, the alcohol damages the fuel lines inner liner after a while also slowly eats away at the fuel tank.imagine regular gas has 10 percent ethanol and it causes problems e85 would be worst.

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