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  1. #1

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    94 SL 650 Stator

    Hi -

    New to the sport, bought a couple of Polaris SL 650s. Had a blast for about 2 hours when the '94 stator wiring melted down. Looking around the internet it would seem I'm not the first to experience this problem. I have a used stator on the way and plan to install it this weekend. My questions: 1) Do I need to pull the engine to do this? I removed the gas tank and it looks like it's possible to access, although it may be tight. Anyone have insight (I don't want to mess with it for hours only to find out the motor needs to be out of the boat). 2) Is there anything special I should do to keep it from happening again? It sounds like the ground connection is critical. The wiring must have gotten quite hot - it burned the insulation off a number of wires, even burned through the oil tube (thankfully after it was shut down, but I now have a bunch of oil in the hull to mop up). Thanks for any help.


  2. #2
    ryandi2's Avatar
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    Welcome!

    make sure your engine mounts are not busted... i had this same thing happen to the same ski and same year... i was jumpig waves and came down broke 3 engine mounts and fired the electical because the engine came down on the wires and fired it..

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Welcome to the Hulk

    The number one way to melt the stator wires is to not have the plastic battery cover in place. If the metal shell of the electrical box touches the battery posts, it will burn up the stator ground wire, which usually melts the entire wire bundle going to the stator.

    Also check every ground wire inside the electrical box. Some of them may also have burned.

    One of the Fuji experts will answer for sure, but I think you can remove the flywheel (that is the hardest part) and the magneto stator assembly with the engine in the hull.

    That said, it is not much more trouble to lift the engine out, where you can work on it more easily. In your case, you can just cut the stator wire bundle off before you lift the engine.

    While you have the engine out, check or remove and clean up the bolts that hold the engine to the bed plate. These sometimes work loose over time.

    If you have not done so, this would be a good time to replace all the fuel lines (including any inside the fuel tank), and rebuild the carburetors.

    Make sure you don't loose track of the tiny brass restrictor plug that is located inside the return fuel line, about an inch from the last car.

  4. #4
    She likes the bike. But the ski gets her wet!!!! xlint89's Avatar
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    Welcome to the Hulk Tom.

    Yes, it can be replaced inside the hull. It's not the easiest thing to do, but by doing it through the front compartment, you don't need to remove the engine, exh pipe, or re-align the engine.

    The flywheel will be the hardest part for sure. Get a good quality harmonic balancer puller. When removing or replacing the flywheel nut, you need to briing the MAG piston near TDC. Then drop some rope (or bungee cord works well) down the spark plug hole. This will keep the engine from turning.

    You MUST use the MAG piston or you may take your crank out of phase.
    Last edited by xlint89; 05-27-2010 at 06:43 AM.

  5. #5

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    Thanks guys, I really appreciate the quick responses. I am planning to tear into it this weekend (if the stator and puller show up in time) and will likely start with the engine left in the hull; if that looks to be a losing battle I'll go to Plan B. I'll post my results, for giggles if nothing else.

  6. #6

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    Quick update - the stator didn't show up until Friday of this past week, so I only had a few hours to work on it. It turns out getting to it with the engine left in the hull isn't at all too bad, once the gas tank and hood and the left side floatation are off. My guess as to why it failed is the cover(s) not being properly sealed and water getting into the magneto area of the engine - when I removed the outer cover a watery/oily mixture poured out. Everything has been cleaned and installed; I now just have to bleed the oil pump and then connect the stator wires.

    Any EEs out there? Wouldn't some sort of fuse arrangement on the ground wire be preferable to torching it when there's an electrical fault? The wires aren't very heavy gauge, so it would seem like a slow-blow automotive-style fuse spliced in-line would keep it reasonably protected. As I mentioned in an earlier post, the wire bundle got so hot it melted an oil line. Thankfully nothing ignited but that seems like a possibility, and I don' know about you guys, but if the thing's on fire I seriously doubt I will spend the time trying to open the hood and get the extinguisher out - I'd be swimming in the opposite direction as fast as possible. Why those are federally mandated is a mystery to me...

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLTom View Post
    ...Wouldn't some sort of fuse arrangement on the ground wire be preferable to torching it when there's an electrical fault?

    The wires aren't very heavy gauge, so it would seem like a slow-blow automotive-style fuse spliced in-line would keep it reasonably protected...
    The entire electrical system depends on the ground link between engine block and electrical box being a solid zero ohms connection.

    A fuse not only has resistance (that is why it works), but a fuse would also represent another potential reliability issue. Fuses and fuse holders can corrode, weaken, or just fail from age and vibration.

    There is no problem with the factory configuration as long as the battery is not allowed to short to the electrical box shell.

    While I am not a fan of the Polaris system of stacking a metal box on top of the battery with just a thin insulator between them, it does work OK as long as that insulating plastic cover is in place.

  8. #8

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    Final (Ha!) Installment

    ...at least for this round - with three mid-90's SL 650s I'd guess I'll be asking the experts questions in the future.

    Late last week I hooked up all the wiring but pushing the start button resulted in nothing - no engine cranking. I jumped a screwdriver across the solenoid and she spun fine, so I made the quick (and incorrect) assumption the solenoid was bad. Got another one and installed it with the same result. I then stopped and read the book (!) and after studying the wiring diagram saw that one of the terminals in the box should be hot from the protected side of the circuit breaker, but it wasn't - there was no wire there. I'm not sure how that happened (maybe the old stator had it attached), but I fashioned a new one and that solved the problem. I then bled the oil pump and, not trusting that there weren't any air bubbles in the lines, stirred up a gallon of pre-mix and put that in the fuel filter bowl and gas tank, with a shot for each of the cylinders. It fired right up on the trailer, so I hauled it down to a nearby lake and ran it for about a half-hour. Runs great, although the double shot of oil made it smoke a bunch. It's now full of straight gas and will get a workout this weekend, weather permitting.

    Thanks to everyone that posted here, I really appreciate the help.
    Last edited by SLTom; 06-17-2010 at 04:00 PM.

  9. #9
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Thank you for posting a follow up.

    It can be really helpful to others who may read this thread later on, to know what the outcome was, and the actual problem cause(s).

    Glad to hear it is now running. Make sure the REST of the machine is checked over.

    These old PWC often have a bunch of minor issues that need attention. Best to find and fix them on land than discover them while out on the water somewhere.

  10. #10
    SNAP!!!!

    i had the exact same thing done to me sl tom im so glad to hear u got it running the only thinkg im concerned about is that were and how do you bleed the oil pump because i have no idea on doing so any help wiould be great my part is on route from the states and i am hoping to have it by start of next week so wikll need to know the ins and outs thanks ally

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