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  1. #1

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    Thumbs up good info on which oil to use in your ski

    Here is a article on why you should not use certin oils in a engine with a sprag type starter clutch and a sprag supercharger clutch! Everone has there favorite oils I know but this article might shed some more good information on this topic: Yamalube Fact Sheet

    Generally when you purchase oil for your engine the first thing you look for is the manufacturers recommended viscosity or basic ‘thickness’ rating as put forth by the Society of Automotive Engineers or SAE. A common oil rating of 10W/40 means the oil is rated at a 40 viscosity and the 10W gives it a secondary cold temperature rating of 10 W (W for winter). The next thing most of us consider is a good brand name. Most car owners have a ‘trusted’ oil which they have come to depend upon and simply are not comfortable purchasing ‘Lubi-Lube’ for the new family SUV. They opt instead for peace of mind choosing a recognized, brand name oil. Finally oils are rated under an API scale for application to gas or diesel engines in trucks and autos. SG and more recently SH, API ratings are the most applicable for motorcycles but do not take into consideration the specific requirements of same.

    Beyond these criteria we enter the world of price marketing and ‘snake oil’ with a plethora of special additives and formulas offering greater performance, economy and longevity. Please consider the following facts when you browse the oils at your favorite supplier and remember, YamahaGenuineParts.com has a good stock of our premium YAMALUBE lubricants if you decide not to gamble.

    First let’s take a look at the base differences between an automotive engine and a four stroke motorcycle or snowmobile engine.

    Start up:

    Automobiles use a dry starting system, where the starter motor engages a ring gear on the flywheel residing on the exterior of the engine. The starter motor itself has a device commonly called a ‘bendix’. It is the job of the bendix to engage the fly wheel with a sliding gear when electricity is applied to the starter and disengage the gear using a spring when the electricity is terminated. The disturbing sound you hear if the ignition key is accidentally turned with the engine running is the starter gear being ground into the flywheel which is spinning at a faster speed and does not allow it to engage.

    Motorcycles use a ‘wet’ starting system. The starter gear lives inside of the sealed engine cases with the engine oil. Generally the starter is engaged to a ring gear affixed to the clutch or crankshaft through a special friction-roller or ‘sprag’ clutch. The sprag clutch will engage the engine in only one direction and spins freely in the other. When electricity is applied to the starter the sprag clutch spins the engine until it ‘fires up’. When that happens the engine rpm exceeds that of the starting system and the sprag clutch free wheels isolating the starter motor from the crank forces. Now here’s the key, the sprag clutch lives in the crankcase oil with all the other engine components. It is designed to operate with a minimal but crucial level of friction which is ultimately determined by the oil.

    Most automobile oils have opted to include an additive to reduce engine friction. These friction reducers or ‘friction modifiers’ assist the overall efficiency of the engine to improve fuel economy and are recommended by the manufactures of automobiles to help decrease fuel consumption and lower emissions. In a modern motorcycle, ATV or snowmobile, the same friction reducers can have a negative effect on the sprag or ‘friction-roller’ clutch possibly creating excessive slippage at start-up and premature wear of the starter system parts.



    Engine performance:

    Now consider the performance level of your bike. Multi-cylinder sport bikes often operate in rpm ranges far higher than most automobiles. The average four cylinder car engine will shift under 5000 rpm and cruise merrily along around 3000rpm at hi-way speeds. The rpm in larger 6 and 8 cylinder engines will be somewhat less. An R1 motorcycle can shift out at over 10,000 rpm and make maximum power approaching 12,000rpm. V-twin cruisers run at lower engine speeds closer to automobiles but unlike a car many of these are ‘air-cooled’ and don’t run at the consistent temperatures found in liquid cooled automobiles. This all equates to motorcycles generating more energy and heat when compared to most automobile engines. Your choice of oil type and additives should also consider what rpm you’re motor runs at and the type of operating temperature ranges that may be required.

    Our YAMALUBE lubricants are refined and blended to the exacting specifications as determined by our engineers. The formulas used in this process are supplied to select refineries around the globe as an exclusive Yamaha ‘recipe’ and the resulting oils must meet or exceed our stringent factory testing parameters. We are confident when we recommend YAMALUBE lubricants for use in your Yamaha. You will be getting the best protection and long term performance with no possibility of oil-related premature wear or component failure. The tried and true oil brand keeping your auto happily humming down the highway may very well be the cause of your motorcycles demise. You can depend on YAMALUBE.

    Summary:

    Refer to your owner’s manual or contact your dealer to determine the correct oil viscosity for your climatic and operating conditions. NOTE: This may change with the seasonal temperature fluctuations in different contries.
    Avoid oils which contain ‘friction reducers’ unless otherwise specified in your owners manual. NOTE: Some automatic scooters recommend friction reducers for optimum fuel mileage. Oil companies typically label their containers to indicate to addition of friction reducers. This may simply read ‘energy conserving’, be forewarned it will contain friction modifiers.
    Change your oil as recommended and prior to off-season storage. Oil doesn’t get ‘used up’ with regards to its lubricating ability. Instead it becomes contaminated with acids and other ‘nasties’ as a result of combustion. Never store your engine with old contaminated oil in it.
    Inquire what brand of oil is ‘on tap’ at your dealership. NOTE: Most shops stock oil in bulk containers (drums) for service work. YAMALUBE is the popular choice for the majority but not all bulk sales.
    When in doubt, insist on genuine YAMALUBE.
    I only use YAMALUBE and OEM oil filters in my ski! Tommy Jordan


  2. #2
    hitman's Avatar
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    I recently came to the conclusion that I wasn't missing out on anything by running regular Yamalube and switched back to it on my last oil change. It's a hell of a lot easier for me to get too. Will it make a difference in the life of the sprag clutch compared to using Amsoil? Maybe not. Doens't matter to me anymore. It's what the manufacturer recommends and is cheaper than what I was using.

  3. #3
    Tommy, with all due respect, consider all this.
    If my synthetic oil makes my 60.00 sprag (slip a little upon startup) then thats ok.
    I am more concerned about keeping my $3000.00 supercharger oiled sufficiently at 90,000 + rpms, which is 13,000+ rpms more than stock OEM allows, and keeping my rotating assembly and valvetrain oiled at 9000+ rpms.
    Can you imagine how fast a spinning shaft at 90,000+ rpms vaporizes oil?
    It has been known for a long time, 20+ years now how far superior synthetic oil is over conventional petroleum based oil, especially under extreme heat and load.
    I think the Yamalube information is true, for a stock engine.
    Here is just one of many tests comparing the two... You can google this all night long and the findings will be the same.. Synthetic is far superior..
    http://www.synthetic-motor-oil-chang...-to-synthetic/

  4. #4

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    I am not trying to get in a pissing match with anyone over which oil is best! I am just trying to provide some usefull information for everyone to read and try to make there own decision . I know the marine eviroment real well and some marine oils have a lot more rust and corrosion protection than non marine oils. I just went to my shop and looked I found seven different brands of oil and 6 different weights of oil on the shelf. So I am not saying that one oil is good for all applications. Each oil has it's good design/properties for that paticular application. Tommy Jordan

  5. #5
    SHOBiz's Avatar
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    So, without getting into any particular brand war issue. We can agree that any oil used should provide excellant corrosion protection that a marine environment requires.


  6. #6
    hitman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2fast4u View Post
    I am not trying to get in a pissing match with anyone over which oil is best!
    Oh yeah?


  7. #7
    OEM all the way ( from experience )I have a couple of friends and tuners that had issues with other very well known oil brands, once they went with oem their problems ended all of a sudden.

  8. #8
    THE PLATE MAN JIM'S PERFORMANCE's Avatar
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    I know one thing that everyone can agree about oil is if you do not have any in your engine it will lock up very quick. Oil is a item that you will not get people to agree with, each person has there own brand and type that they like to use. I heard some virgin olive oil works very good i might give it a try next oil change.

  9. #9
    hitman's Avatar
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    Yamalube is part synthetic isn't it?

  10. #10
    No pissing match at all Tommy... The pissing matches usually are between which brand is better, amsoil is better than pennzoil which is better than mobil but not as good as quicksilver and so on.. Kinda like the old ford, chevy, mopar debates. And by the way Tommy, Chevy is better than Mopar! Just kidding of course.. Hemi lover here also..
    All i am stating is the undeniable fact that synthetic oil far outperforms conventional motor oil in extreme/racing conditions.
    I am just relaying this information.. The facts are out there.. Do your own research and read for yourself..

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