Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    "just sayin".. jetdave56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    JERSEY SHORE
    Posts
    4,494
    +1
    617

    R&D rideplate for speed ,a basic understanding......

    Let me understand some of the basics so what I've read becomes clear:


    1) the front of the rideplate(towards the bow) ALWAYS sits above the pump shoe and hull.

    2)the tail of the rideplate sits as high as it can, meaning no washers or very very thin washers and the pump must be grinded off underneath as much as structurely possible.


    3)to create this "rising angle" you need to go back to the front of the plate and put a washer(1/16)thick more or less.

    4)this will create the "angle" BUT will drop the front down by nature,YOU DO NOT want any part of the plate going below the shoe or hull BUT just enough brought down that will naturally bring the 'tail ' part higher creating that angle.

    5) now there less "drag" and water travels quicker back

    Guys please throw some insight into this long studied discussion...


  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by jetdave56 View Post
    Let me understand some of the basics so what I've read becomes clear:


    1) the front of the rideplate(towards the bow) ALWAYS sits above the pump shoe and hull.

    2)the tail of the rideplate sits as high as it can, meaning no washers or very very thin washers and the pump must be grinded off underneath as much as structurely possible.


    3)to create this "rising angle" you need to go back to the front of the plate and put a washer(1/16)thick more or less.

    4)this will create the "angle" BUT will drop the front down by nature,YOU DO NOT want any part of the plate going below the shoe or hull BUT just enough brought down that will naturally bring the 'tail ' part higher creating that angle.

    5) now there less "drag" and water travels quicker back

    Guys please throw some insight into this long studied discussion...
    You got it dave. On my plate, towards the grate i had room to play and still not drag so i put some washer there.

  3. #3
    improvised tmg97gp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Midlothian Virginia USA ~ On the James River~
    Posts
    1,377
    +1
    10
    sounds like a plan to me.

  4. #4
    "just sayin".. jetdave56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    JERSEY SHORE
    Posts
    4,494
    +1
    617
    Right now my plate is above the shoe and hull,and the boss ends have been filed down by Carl(island racing) and Jim.The pump's been grinded down so the plate is sitting high up in the hull.But I have 1/16 washers under all 4 bosses so I'm not creating any real angle, no real "drag" but no upwards angle either,hmm........so should I just leave the 1/16 washers in the front and have the back bosses sit "flush" against the hull.?

    As the back of the plate goes up, the front with washers goes down,is that a good time to check with a straight edge from the shoe thru the rideplate?

  5. #5
    Eastside Powersports Slow 91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    River Crew CT
    Posts
    4,248
    +1
    544
    hmm this will be a very helpfull thread of how to achieve proper angle.

  6. #6
    old school gp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    miami
    Posts
    705

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by jetdave56 View Post
    Let me understand some of the basics so what I've read becomes clear:


    1) the front of the rideplate(towards the bow) ALWAYS sits above the pump shoe and hull.

    2)the tail of the rideplate sits as high as it can, meaning no washers or very very thin washers and the pump must be grinded off underneath as much as structurely possible.


    3)to create this "rising angle" you need to go back to the front of the plate and put a washer(1/16)thick more or less.

    4)this will create the "angle" BUT will drop the front down by nature,YOU DO NOT want any part of the plate going below the shoe or hull BUT just enough brought down that will naturally bring the 'tail ' part higher creating that angle.

    5) now there less "drag" and water travels quicker back

    Guys please throw some insight into this long studied discussion...
    Thank u jetdave I have been wanting to ask that for the longest I been reading my ass off bout that n just didnt understand the whole rideplate angle shime thing.didnt have the balls to ask.

  7. #7
    The mounting bosses either have to be carefully ground or machined in order for you to be able to adjust the plate position and angle.
    If your bottomed out meaning no shims, and you`d like more plate angle if possible, then the feet/bosses have to be trimmed more.
    Plate angle tuning is tedious work and time consuming.
    some copromise numbers would be in the .750 range where the ski has decent speed and still handles somewhat rougher waters... the more angle on the plate = more bow out of the water which also = more speed and looser feeling, less grip in the turns... You also could go past the point where it become innefective for your ski... trial and error and testing will reveal the best results for your hull. and don`t forget about the trims tabs as well...
    here`s a few pics: plate angle measurement, shims, nozzle clearance.

  8. #8
    measuring the ride plate angle for setting up the ride plate.
    pretty simple. Take a 4 ft level or suitable straight edge and place on (under) the hull just behind the keel. There is a cross + marking right there, place the level on that mark. Hold the level/straight edge up to hull across the shoe and take your measurement at the end of the ride plate to the top of the level/straight edge.
    It is important that the shoe be square/true and flat. (Which should have been addressed when installing a PPK.)

    the small jack is just to hold the level in place while I take the pics. there are multiple views to get the idea.

  9. #9
    recently hearing that it is suggested to have .020 at the wings of the shoe so the water does not catch leading edge of plate or the windows in the plate. I had the plate totally flush at the wings.
    so, went and removed the plate and adjusted the feet/mounting bosses/shims to get this new set up.
    there is now a loose .020 at the wings and still have good plate angle... .937
    all centers/center lines all line up...

    I don`t know how much difference or even if on my ski, but doesn`t hurt to try and see what occurs...

  10. #10
    "just sayin".. jetdave56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    JERSEY SHORE
    Posts
    4,494
    +1
    617
    Andy always with the great pics.Ok we see with the leveler what you are getting at.There's that step up going back from the shoe to the rideplate.That leveler going back all the way to the tail of the plate,it being "level'' off the shoe,it should NEVER touch the rideplate at any point.This is your plate 'rise' or angle.But under NO circumstances should the whole plate going across the shoe and hull be below, that I mean the "wing" part as you like to call it....WHEW.....

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. What rideplate finish is best for speed?
    By DarthAWM in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-17-2008, 10:25 PM
  2. Group K Rideplate For Sale!!! Shipped Priorty Mail Lower Us.
    By Hurricane1000 in forum Kawasaki PWC Performance (4-stroke)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-20-2007, 09:19 AM
  3. !!Need help for SPEED!!
    By Chezzy in forum Yamaha PWC Performance (2-stroke)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-24-2006, 03:17 PM
  4. Get your need for speed here...
    By Smitty in forum Videos & Pictures
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-15-2006, 09:26 PM
  5. Need For Speed
    By ph2ocraft in forum Yamaha Open Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-07-2006, 01:55 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •