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Thread: KSHIT

  1. #1

    KSHIT

    I loosened the 15F pump shaft, pulled the pump and pressed out the front bearing for a look. No special Kawasaki tools are required.

    I used a open end wrench on the drive shaft in the hull and an open end on the pump shaft wrenching flats under the cone. I then pulled the pump, impeller, pump shaft, and finally the forward pump bearing. The special splined impeller holding tool and shaft holder are not required and a waste of money for infrequent pump rebuilds. This is still a one-man job BTW.

    My bearings are still like new after 120 hours use so back in they go. The trick is to heat the case and use a press to smoothly remove the forward bearing. For pressing I used sockets with the correct OD. It took less than an expected force to press out so the bearing was not damaged during removal. Use of a hammer and all bets are off. Both bearings have lots of frictional seal/grease drag just like they had 50 hours ago; the last time the pump was off. I can see why guys like the wet pump mod to gain a tiny bit of useful power. Loading them radially and axially demonstrates perfectly smooth operation with no play. I torqued the pump shaft to 70ft/lb the same way I removed it without any KSHIT (Kawasaki-Super-High-Intensity-Tools). I had new parts on order just incase but will now cancel that order. 70 bucks from the dealer for a front bearing is nuts, just for the sake of having a spare I might never use. ( $200 for both bearings, 3 garloc seals, a circlip and a couple of o-rings kind of screams rape)

    For pressing out I used a thin piece of metal under the pump center hub where the cone normally sits, for pressing in I used a big socket under the other end of the center hub. The reason is to prevent loading up the stator vanes. The inner race of the front bearing has HB stamped on it along with a fraction and this faces aft(at least it did on mine).

    There was concern several months ago about the secondary rear bearing spinning. I measured the wear shadow where the rear bearing seats and while there is no step it has been moving. This time it went together with sleeve retainer so it won’t slip in the housing as before, we’ll see how it holds up after next season.

    What I did notice is some aluminum corrosion at the circlip area holding the pump seals. This session it got cleaned up and Mastinox applied to the circlip groove.

    I have been using silicone grease on the big rubber between the pump and shoe and it works great.

    Kawasaki’s stainless steel is crap and shows rust, I had to remove exterior doublers, seat hold down etc and scotch-brite the rust away and clean the rust deposits from the hull. I also checked the water nipple at the rear motor mount output housing and that looks like a place to watch for corrosion. It’s the winter nipple we often pull the hose from to drain the exhaust manifold and it isn’t a decent brass like the other water fittings found around the machine.

    Do it yourself I say, know what you have and save- all at the same time.


  2. #2
    nicjak's Avatar
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    as i have said many times before if you think outside the square and are mechanicly minded you dont need the so called special tools. i would have replaced the front bearing for piece of mind though. as i dont like pressing bearings out from the centre race no matter how careful i am. jmpo. its only a 15f so no biggy

  3. #3
    The nice thing about heating the case is you press less than the thing has thrust when it is being driven (rated at 900 pounds)

    rt

  4. #4
    Daveski's Avatar
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    I dont know where your located but in the USA the front bearing is 27.96, rear is 16.14, seals are 18.52 each for a total of 99.66

  5. #5

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    Rotor, good write-up, but where's the pics? We're male, you know

  6. #6
    nicjak's Avatar
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    you need pics for that pretty self explanatory if you look at your pump

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by nicjak View Post
    you need pics for that pretty self explanatory if you look at your pump
    Sadly, YES.....they truly help the weak n 'disabiliteed'

    I have lots of the "oh....I see....NOW I get it" moments

    Don't you?

    Of course, I realize that Rotor likely doesn't have any pics on hand to post of this operation, which I will be doing some time over the winter or mid-summer on 2 skis. I'll keep this post handy, certain it'll make more sense once I dig into the 1st ski

  8. #8
    Take the time to smile sirbreaksalot's Avatar
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    The only down side in doing a backyard process like this ( not bashing cause some time you just need to use what tools you have at hand )

    I would NOT be recommending the reverse process for the tightening of the prop
    because the is NO WAY of achieving the correct TORQUE setting when installing the prop on to the shaft.........

    This is why not just kawi but every OEM in any industry provides us with specific tension setting


    WHY do I say this

    Because right now I have MY engine laying on the bench due to my prop undoing because I took a backyard short cut and did not use a VISE and KAWI Prop tool

    I tried to use the rear flats of the pump with a shifter and a 2ft pole
    I was confident that it was tight enough........
    Guess what


    So my Professional mechanical opinion like it or not is as follows

    Remove / strip your pump or what ever part you are working on as you wish with wot tools u have.

    But assemble with NEW parts ( even the $35 bearings that save your engine )

    And use some of those STUPID tools to achieve the correct result and protect your investment at the same time......... ( you dont need all of them but there is always some u WILL need )

    I promise you that a PROP tool is cheaper than a crankshaft with destroyed thrust bearing,cases etc ..........

    I have used incorrect tools in my mechanical experiences, and got away with it more often than not..........

    but for those with limited mechanical experience I STRONGLY suggest use the correct tools and procedures...

    But hey what would I know.........


    once again SHORT cutz will bit you in the end ....... thats a fact

    Waz

  9. #9
    Dude, I used a torque wrench. If you put the torque wrench on the prop or the shaft it makes no difference, torque is torque. The device by which this is achieved is called a crow's foot that is designed for a torque wrench. You just need to use the formula for the offset so you don't over do it (it adds a small lever effect unless it is placed 90 degrees on the square drive to the length of the wrench). Maybe you didn't read my post as it quoted 70 foot pounds. That value came from the service manual. Do you think I should go higher than spec?

    As for the bearing heat was used to expand the housing to avoid damage from excess removal force. Aluminum and steel have different expansion rates. The bearing was also carefully inspected after removal. Why would I throw out a perfectly good, tight -corrosion free and smooth running part? Who's to say the replacement bearing will be as good, they changed vendors (PNs) recently. If you don't have the skill or experience to judge a bearings condition or removal loading, then by all means replace it.

    Then again, some guys should really just follow the book when not understanding the process. Removal and installation of a bearing with a press works better than a drift and hammer as per the Kawasaki manual using wackasaki tools. That is why I went to the trouble of explaining the how and why plus the extra measures for ideal press set-up.

  10. #10

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