Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    SHOBiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wylie, Texas
    Posts
    3,577

    Question R&D Cam Gear Install Doc

    Does anyone have the R&D Cam Gear install in PDF?



  2. #2
    Addicted Member 5001craig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Northeast Indiana
    Posts
    2,924
    +1
    11
    Where's hitman???

  3. #3
    hitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    4,328
    +1
    12
    I can't seem to find it in PDF form but you can email Glenn and ask for it or I can. Here is what I could find in my email.

    R&D YAMAHA FZ/FZR/SHO
    ADJUSTABLE RACING CAM GEAR KIT
    2008-2010 SHO/FZ/FZR ENGINES

    INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS



    INTRODUCTION


    The R&D Pro Tune Cam Gears were designed and developed to allow the Lobe Centers on the intake or exhaust cams to be advanced or retarded individually to adjust the overall Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). Understanding how the LSA affects the type of power characteristics and overall peak horsepower is a complex subject. A brief summary of how wider or narrower LSA affects overall and peak horsepower are as follows.

    A wide LSA will generally result in decreased valve overlap, later intake events, earlier exhaust events, and high intake manifold vacuum which produce great idle, smooth accelerating low end and mild top end power. A wide LSA generally has reduced cylinder pressure over a narrow LSA, and wide LSA’s usually will be less likely to have knock or detonation. Wide LSA ’s are great for school buses, motor homes, or mini vans where smooth power and economy are required.

    A narrower LSA will generate increased valve overlap, earlier intake events, later exhaust events (depending on the LC of the exhaust cam), and increased cylinder pressures which will result in snappier throttle response, increased mid range and top end power (when properly tuned). The R&D Tuneable Cam Gear Kit offers four possible LSA combinations that allow the cams individual Lobe Centers and overall LSA to be tuned depending on the type of riding or racing and type of fuel.



    Observe the R&D Cam Gears. Each gear is specifically marked identifying the intake and exhaust cam gear. Also marked on each gear are marks indicating stock position, 2 and 5 degree advanced, and 2 and 5 degree retarded. Listed below in the LSA suggested settings section are 4 suggested settings that have been extensively tested and precision degree checked on a specific cam degree engine to insure timing accuracy and to ease the installation process. Examine the LSA setting chart and chose a setup group that matches the type of engine performance and type of fuel that will be used. NOTE: For most 10-13 pound boost wheels and a 116 degree LSA, 91-93 octane fuel can safely be used as long as peak ignition timing is not over 20-22 degrees. ( The peak ignition timing in the R&D R1,R2, and R3 ECU packages fall safely in this range of not being over 22 degrees) R&D suggests the use of 100LL Aviation fuel for 15 pound boost wheels and 115 degree LSA, and 110 octane racing fuel such as VP-C12 for LSA settings narrower than 112 degree LSA.



























    SUGGESTED LSA SETTING CHART



    .Intake Cam Lobe Center Exhaust Cam Lobe Center LSA AVERAGE ST STOCK=122.5 LC STOCK=117.5 LC 120 LSA

    S1 2A =120.5 LC STOCK=117.5 LC 119 LSA

    S2 5A =117.5 LC STOCK=117.5 LC 117.5 LSA

    S3 5A =117.5 LC 2A =115.5 LC 116.5 LSA

    S4 5A =117.5 LC 5A =112.5 LC 115.0 LSA







    S1, S2, S3, S4 refer to a specific cam setup group which will result in a given overall LSA average on the chart above. ST will represent the O.E.M. stock Yamaha 2009-2011 FZR/SHO 1.8 Supercharged engines cam timing. R&D has observed that the O.E.M. cam gear has a hole size .015 larger than the shouldered bolt that positions the gear. This clearance can cause “Loose Cam Timing” that can vary the overall LSA as much as 2-3 degrees (at the crank) from engine to engine. R&D has checked various sets of stock cams from several engines and has came up with the chart above to offer an average of what was found in Lobe Center and overall LSA. R&D has also used the R&D Cam Tool Kit to observe the cam timing as true timing is very difficult to achieve when the hydraulic timing chain tensioner does not have oil in it as the engine is not running to have oil pressure to keep the chain tight. The R&D Cam Tool Kit utilizes a spring to keep 65-80 pounds of pressure on the timing chain to keep the chain tight while either degree checking the cams, or verifying the cam timing position.



    S1 will work noticeably well for recreational offshore riders or racers with stock, C1, or C3 or any other wheel combination running in the 10-13 pound boost range and in the 8300-8400 rpm range running the R&D R1 or R2 ECU. This LSA cam setting will work well to add a noticeable mid range top end increase by adding approximately 75-100 rpms to existing RPM range. The S1 setting will work well for extreme long wide open riding conditions typically found in offshore racing. The S1 setting will change the LSA from 120 to 119 degrees by advancing the intake cam 2 degrees (opening the intake valve earlier). Fuel Octane Range will be 89-91.



    S2 will work noticeably well for recreational offshore riders or racers with C1, or C3 or any other wheel combination running in the 10-13 pound boost range and in the 8400-8500 rpm range running the R&D R1 or R2 ECU. This cam setting will work well to add a noticeable increase in overall power with added mid range and top end increase over S1 by adding approximately 150 plus rpms to existing RPM range. The S2 setting will work well for long wide open riding conditions typically found in offshore racing. The S2 setting will change the LSA from 120 to 117.5 degrees by advancing the intake cam 5 degrees. Fuel Octane Range will be 91-93. R&D suggests that using setting S2 with C5 wheels should run the R3 ECU to safely run 91-93 octane fuel.



    S3 will work very well for offshore or closed course racers with C3 or C5 or any other wheel combination running in the 14-15 pound boost range and in the 8500-8600 rpm range running the R&D R3 ECU. This cam setting will work well to add a noticeable boost in overall power over the S2 with stronger bottom end and mid range top end increase by adding approximately 150-200 rpms to existing RPM range. The S3 setting will work well for offshore sprint racing and closed course riding conditions. The S3 setting will change the LSA from 120 to 116.5 degrees. Fuel octane Range will be 91-93 octane for C3 (10-13 pounds of boost), and100 octane fuel such as 100LL Aviation fuel for C5 (15-16 pounds of boost). NOTE. R&D recommends the use of the R3 ECU with this setting. The peak ignition timing in the R3 ECU has been set up to be 16 pound boost friendly.



    S4 will work noticeably well for recreational racers with C3 or C5 any other wheel combination running in the 15-16 pound boost range and in the 8600-8700 rpm range running the R&D R3 ECU. This cam setting will work well to add a noticeable boost in overall power over the S3 with noticeably stronger bottom end and mid range top end increase by adding approximately 200 plus rpms to existing RPM range. The S4 setting will work well for closed course riding conditions. The S4 setting will change the LSA from 120 to 115 degrees. Fuel octane Range will be 100 octane fuel such as 100LL Aviation fuel for C3, and VP-C12 for C5 (15-16 pounds of boost). NOTE. R&D recommends the use of the R3 ECU with this setting. The peak ignition timing in the R3 ECU has been set up to be 16 pound boost friendly. NOTE: The narrower the LSA the closer you get to the detonation point or range, therefore, higher octane fuel must be used. In general, the more narrower the LSA settings the higher octane rating should be in the fuel. IF it is not desirable to run race fuel with narrower LSA settings, then don’t run narrower settings.







    Required tools and supplies





    8, 10, 12mm socket, 5mm allen head socket

    # 4 and # 6 flat blade screwdrivers

    10mm boxed end 12 pt. wrench

    Large pair of channel lock pliers (to rotate cams) or (camshaft wrench # 90890-067240

    Yamaha Tool #90890-06725 Gauge Stand*Yamaha Tool #YB-06585 (Dial Gauge Stand Set)

    Yamaha Tool #YU-03097/90890-01252 Dial Gauge

    Yamaha Tool 90890-06584 Dial Gauge Needle

    Yamaha Tool 90890-067240 Camshaft Wrench

    R&D Cam Timing Tool Kit # 000-09000 ( uses a spring instead of hydraulic tensioner during camshaft and cam gear gear set ups)

    Recommended tools

    Pliers (for removal and replacement of the PVC hose spring clamp).

    Yamaha SHO Service Manual (section 5 pages 51-78 for all cam and head information)





    Installation Tips

    1. Remove all four spark plugs and disconnect the fuel injectors from the main harness.

    This will prevent fuel from being injected when turning the engine over to verify TDC and Cam Timing Alignment

    2. Install the dial indicator set in cylinder 1 and verify exact TDC on cylinder 1 and verify Cam Timing Marks before removing the cam chain tensioner or cam gear bolts. Note: R&D has observed several production engines and has found that the exhaust cam does not always align exactly with the mark on the cam tower. (see photo marked STK EX) The exhaust cam can appear to be a tooth off. It is not a tooth off and the O.E.M. manual does not refer to the marks very well. Observe both cam positions as installed and refer to the supplied pictures to help time the cams properly. If you have a digital camera, take a few reference photos of your own to reference the cam timing to the cam tower. When changing the intake cam gear or vise versa, a pair of needle nose vise grips can be used as show in the diagram to keep the timing chain locked to the gear so the chain can not jump or skip a tooth. The vise grips only need to be tight enough to keep the chain from moving.



    3. Remove the hydraulic cam chain tensioner and install the R&D 10mm oil block sleeve to the banjo bolt into the head. This will keep oil from leaking into the hull while cranking the engine to verify TDC and cam timing. NOTE: The oil block sleeve is part of the R&D Cam Tool Kit.





    4. Install the R&D Cam Chain Tensioner Tool while verifying TDC and cam timing. The R&D Tool Kit will save time and hassle as the hydraulic cam chain tensioner will not keep cam chain tension unless the engine is running. The R&D Tool will save lots of time and will aid in timing the cams and verifying the gear and cam timing is correct before installing the hydraulic tensioner. When installing the hydraulic cam tensioner, it will be necessary to use a 1 inch diameter piece of aluminum approximately 3 inches long and a hammer to tap on the cam tensioners back side to jar the internal spring loose to tension the chain. TRY IT!!! Wind the cam tensioner clockwise until it is bottomed out and the safety retainer locked in place. Hold the cam tensioner in your hand and hit the back side with a hammer. The tensioner should spring out into tension mode. Repeat the cam tensioner reset proceedure, lock it, and install the tensioner to the engine and tighten the allen bolts securely. Jar the tensioner to unlock it. If you don’t follow this procedure that is CLEARLY NOT in the manual, then you can easily have the timing chain climb the gears and be a tooth off. It is very easy for this to happen, however, if the cams are in time, and the tensioner is installed using the R&D method, your cam timing should go very smoothly. Also, refer to the photo displaying to rotate the cam counter clockwise 90 degrees to remove the second cam gear bolt, install the R&D gear and one sprocket bolt. Rotate the cam back clockwise 90 degrees, install the second bolt, and tighten the bolts. Rotate the engine over to verify #1 TDC and cam timing is right. Once the cam timing is verified and the cam tensioner is installed, rotate the engine to expose the cam sprocket bolts and torque them to 17.7 Ft Lbs.



    5. Remove the main black PVC box, remove the main electrical box cover, remove the main electrical box from the white transom plate and lay it aside or up over the main transom plate, and remove the main black coupler cover. This will allow access to the main aluminum drive couplers. The easiest (and safest) way to turn the engine over without the starter is by turning the rear drive coupler with a pipe wrench clockwise. The engine will only turn over one way as the main starter clutch only allows the engine to turn clockwise. If TDC is passed up, the crank will have to be turned over twice to get back to TDC on Cylinder 1. Remember, the crank spins twice to the cams once. If you only spin once, you will be at TDC on cylinder.



    If removing the cam towers to remove the cams and gears, remove each tower in exact order if removing the towers. Mark them with a sharpie pen as they are not marked very well from the factory. Mark them INT 1, 2, and 3 with an arrow pointing towards the front of the engine. Mark the EX in the same manner. When removing the cams, refer to and mark the intake and exhaust cam. There is an alignment dot on each cam. The intake cam will have the dot on the intake lobes of Cylinder 2, and the exhaust cam will have the dot on the exhaust lobes on Cylinder3. The cam gears can be installed one cam at a time, however, one of the bolts on each cam will be hard to get to. Use a thin flat 10mm wrench to loosen the cam gear bolts. Move the chain and rotate the cam 180 to remove the bolts. If its your first cam gear rodeo, follow the manual, if you are a pro, then you already know what to do. The supplied photos will help identify the cams.



    6. Refer to the O.E.M. Yamaha Service manual information in section 5, pages 51-78. if you do not have a Yamaha Service Manual, contact R&D performance and we will be glad to E-mail you the entire section.







    - INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS –

    1. Disconnect and remove the lanyard from the craft. Disconnect the battery. (recommended until it is necessary to crank the engine over to verify or double check the cam timing marks and TDC)

    2. Remove the front and rear seats. Remove the main plastic engine cover.

    3. Remove the coils, disconnect the coil wires, disconnect the fuel injectors, disconnect the cam position sensor

    4. Remove the valve cover, disconnect the PVC and crankcase hoses.

    5. Install a proper dial indicator and turn the engine over to verify TDC before removing any parts.

    6. Refer to the Yamaha Service Section 5 for cam and gear removal/installation and proper torque specifications.





    NOTE: R&D has determined that the O.E.M LCA is a WIDE 120 degrees stock, with an intake cam lobe center of between 121.5 and 122.5 degrees. Considering the LCA timing facts, using the R&D Pro Tune Cam Gears to tune the cams will generate huge performance power gains. R&D has found in testing that a 2.5 degree LCA change will act similar to a 1 pound boost addition. Tests have proven that an R&D C1 or C3 compressor wheel an a 7 degree LCA change can have the same performance advantages as a 15 pound compressor wheel. Call R&D for constant power upgrade information as we are constantly at work looking for more.

  4. #4
    SHOBiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wylie, Texas
    Posts
    3,577
    That should help.
    Lord, I hope this dude can get this right.

    Thanks

  5. #5
    big john's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Cocoa Beach, Florida, United States
    Posts
    3,395
    +1
    598
    fairly simple install, removing the intake was the biggest pain to get the tensioner out, the second pain in the ass is not ordering the gaskets ahead of time, i cant believe that most dealer dont stock the tensioner of intake gaskets !!!!!!!!!!!! WTF

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. N/A cam gear install
    By bryantjopplin in forum Yamaha PWC Performance (4-stroke)
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 08-22-2013, 10:14 PM
  2. SHO R&D Cam gears install
    By peachypete82 in forum Yamaha PWC Performance (4-stroke)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-09-2010, 08:17 PM
  3. bigger washers on cam gear?
    By BoostedH23a1 in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-15-2010, 06:42 PM
  4. Cam Gear ???
    By beerdart in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-18-2009, 07:21 PM
  5. Rotax Racing cam gear help!!!??
    By psycho rxp in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 03-26-2006, 03:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •