Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Dielectric Grease

    Whats been your luck on the use of non-conductive grease as a corrosion preventative. I spent some time looking through some of the other brands and it is a mixed bag...but most leaning towards yes.

    I just received my new "SYSTEM INTERFACE" fresh from the Polaris shelf of misfit parts and want to go through the rest of the ski and make sure that I at least give them a fighting chance.

    On my bikes, I always use dielectric on non critical components...but shy away from use on brain related (especially things like ABS) connections. I did, however, find all sorts of threads with guys lathering up their ski's ECU connections and all other connections with grease and silicone.

    I actually looked through my Polaris shop manual and did not find it there either. Maybe Polaris figured we would never have to replace an electronic component!


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,573
    +1
    1,272
    Dielectric grease simply prevents the metal connector parts from being exposed to water/air. The grease is designed to not conduct electricity and not attack plastic connector materials.

    Dielectric grease does not 'enhance' electric connections. It merely protects them from corrosion over time.

    In general, you first make sure the electrical contacts are clean metal to metal connections. Dried up and old thick grease in or on the actual metal contacts is not good. Clean it off.

    For sealed connectors (which I think is almost every connector in a PWC, except the battery and solenoid studs) you can smear a thin layer of grease around the seals to make them slide together easier and possibly fill in small gaps in the seals.

    And that should be enough. For some connectors there may have been dielectric grease applied at the factory right into the connector pins and sockets. If there is enough contact pressure within each socket to force the grease aside and create a solid metal to metal contact, then the dielectric grease on the pins is not a problem.

    For some connectors Polaris or Weber may have specified whether or not dielectric grease is to be applied.

    I know on the fuel injected 2-stroke Ficht engines that Polaris specifically says to not apply dielectric grease to the pins of the low voltage TPS connector, just the connector rubber seal.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post

    For some connectors Polaris or Weber may have specified whether or not dielectric grease is to be applied.

    I know on the fuel injected 2-stroke Ficht engines that Polaris specifically says to not apply dielectric grease to the pins of the low voltage TPS connector, just the connector rubber seal.
    I was surprised I could not find that anywhere.

    A few of my connectors had grease on them and a few did not...there appeared to be no rhyme or reason. A safe bet would probably be a light coat of silicone and just reconnecting.

    My PO did no maintenance himself, so the only hands that have touched my ski have been the local dealer...and I cannot say for certain if they were following factory advice or just slapping it on where they thought appropriate.

  4. #4
    slothman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    731
    +1
    30
    unless you are riding in salt water every day, I wouldn't worry about it

    you will more than likely cause more damage than prevent anything ...

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by slothman View Post
    unless you are riding in salt water every day, I wouldn't worry about it

    you will more than likely cause more damage than prevent anything ...
    You would think, but the reverse module I just had to replace had almost every pin coated in rust...obviously the seal did not prevent moisture getting to the metal/metal contacts points. Most of the other joints appeared to be clean and dry...so maybe this one just had a bad seal.

  6. #6
    slothman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    731
    +1
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by illin View Post
    You would think, but the reverse module I just had to replace had almost every pin coated in rust...obviously the seal did not prevent moisture getting to the metal/metal contacts points. Most of the other joints appeared to be clean and dry...so maybe this one just had a bad seal.
    Well, different elevations and weather conditions are going to effect different metal parts. If your ski is stored in a climate controlled dry area, then corrosion is obviously less likely. If you live near the ocean and the ski is outside where rust is more prone, then obviously you might have issues.

    Either way, I think a very light coating of dielectric grease on each electrical component would be OK. However, if you start gooping it on everything, you might have problems.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Dielectric Grease vs Dow Corning 111
    By Av8tordude in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-23-2015, 09:02 AM
  2. Dielectric Grease
    By saxwinder in forum Sea Doo Open Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-05-2014, 02:11 PM
  3. Dielectric grease on electrical fittings?
    By TangoDown in forum Sea Doo Open Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-26-2012, 11:18 PM
  4. Dielectric Grease on Spark Plug Threads
    By TheEngineer in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-11-2009, 07:45 PM
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-02-2007, 11:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •