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  1. #1

    My 2003 Gp1300r Almost sank today while it was anchored and I wasn't paying attention

    Hey guys. First post here, but I've heard this is the community to be a part of. My name's dan, and i'm from Erie, PA. I live about 5 minutes from the lake, so owning a PWC seemed a great idea. I ended up buying a great 2003 gp1300r from a guy in pittsburgh.

    Craft has had oil pump removed and runs premix (amsoil interceptor of course) 40:1.
    Riva controller
    R&D intake grate
    Something in the powervalves to make them more reliable ???

    I've put about 15 hours on the ski so far. Relatively moderate riding with a few times hitting 66-70 on the speedo, indicated.

    Today, I was hanging out with some friends at the beach. I anchored the GPR about 70 feet offshore and focused on issues at hand. I walk my girl back to her car (she's sore from the waves we were jumping a few days ago), and go to walk back to the ski and head back to the dock and go home. I look at my ski and it looks like it's sitting funny. The nose seems much higher than the tail end and I can't see much of the tail

    As I get closer, I realize that the boat is sinking^!&!&!&*!#. So I run out and untie from the anchor and try to get on it, but it doesn't have the buoyancy to keep me up, so before it goes any lower, I quickly get back off. I then thought maybe if I could get the engine running, I the bilge pump would fix everything. I try to start it and see if i can get on from the side or something, at which point it turns over once and locks up.

    Hydrolock I assume? I end up pulling it to shore and onto the beach. I had 6 or 7 buddies help me get it across the beach to the sand parking lot, went and got the trailer and came back and got the ski back on it (Which is great fun when it's on the sand, and you only have one buddy left to help lift).

    Get the ski home. I cleaned all the sand off. Shot enough water through the impeller and intake grate to make sure no sand was left in there. Still wouldn't start. I pulled the plugs and cranked it. A fountain of water came out of each cylinder, with a slight gas smell, mostly water. I flushed the cooling system with fresh water and reinstalled the plugs. GPR now cranks but will not fire. Pulled cylinder 2 plug and tried cranking again. It's not seeming to spark on every engine cycle but got enough spark to shock the hell out of me while I held onto the plug wire.

    And now I am at a loss for what to do.

    I've heard that the 2 strokes are finnickey and if you happen to flip one or get water in the engine, you've gotta be very careful, quick and particular about how you handle it.

    What am I doing wrong, or what would you guys recommend? Also, if I try to crank it for more than 5 seconds or so, the engine warning light comes on.

    So my questions:
    1. Why would a boat that has no history of taking on any water start to do so all of a sudden, while not being run. The drain plugs were in and sealed.
    2. What procedure should I follow to get the waverunner again?
    3. Have I done anything wrong that I should know about perhaps for next time?

    Any help will be very appreciated. This is my first craft and I've got so much to learn.
    Thanks guys.

  2. #2
    crashhard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Philly PA, Wildwood NJ, Indialantic FL
    Good thing is that the water is fresh water, tomorrow though you need to remove the ski from the trailer onto some grass have 2 buddies help and roll the ski over on its side and crank it with the plugs out, there is alot of water still in the motor. Then tip it to the other side and do it again. Then wd-40 fog the cylinders heavy then crank it again to lube the cylinders and lower end. Now put the plugs in and fire it. Let run for a minute shut off and fog again, then run for alittle on the hose and you should be good.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Texas City, Texas
    As long as water is coming out of each cylinder, keep cranking usind WD40 as your lubricant. Try to start it every now and again with clean, dry plugs (I would wash them with brake parts cleaner or blow dry them with an air compressor). Once it starts and the starting is reliable, put it in the water and ride it hard for a long time (at least 1 hour). The water is in your crank case, and it takes a bit to get all of the water out and at the same time get your bearings relubricated. If you let it sit for any length of time, those bearings could rust which will create some serious problems. Ride that thing for a while and ASAP until you are absolutely sure all of the water is gone.

    When air is drawn into your engine, each cylinder generates little hurricane type winds, so the harder you ride it, the better it is as far as eliminating water.

    You still need to figure out where the water is coming from.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Grass Valley, CA
    This exact thing happened to my GP1200R.

    Turned out it was a steering cable grommet that was backed out about 1/8" that cause the leak. Check all the grommets where cables pass through your hull to your pump. If there's nothing there, check your pump tunnel for cracks.

    To get the ski running again, we just pulled the plugs, sprayed WD-40 down the jugs and cranked and cranked and cranked until no more water was coming out. We never tipped the ski on the lawn or anything like that, although you may have to if you have more water in the thing than I did (there was water up to my cylinder head though).

    It took about 30 minutes of spraying and cranking, a set of new plugs, and a battery charger, some canned air, and about an hour of sitting under the sun with the seat off to dry the carbs... but the ski ran again. I then took it to the lake immediately and ran the shit out of it for a good tank full.

  5. #5
    Steveard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Portland, Oregon
    How was this anchored?

  6. #6
    The boat was anchored via a small PWC anchor I ordered online. It was attached around the handle bars in a means that would distribute the force evenly around the column in the middle. It was also a reasonably calm day, small swells.

    I've gotten the craft to start but it will not idle without me maintaining a small amount of throttle. I have been unable to get the craft to the water. I've got my daughter for a few days so getting an hour of hard riding in before thursday will be very difficult.

    Is there any maximum length of time you guys would run the boat on the trailer using hose water to cool it?

    Any other steps I could make until I can ride the craft hard that might help?

  7. #7
    if you cant use it for a few days i suggest you start it up on the hose again, run it for 15-30 mins or as long as you wish but give it a few hard revs to try blast any water out you can and then take the plugs out and spray shit loads of wd40 down the bores, spin it over, maybe even spray some into the air-box whilst cranking it so the oil gets sucked thru the throttle bodies, the more oil the better, then when you go to use it on the river just take the plugs back out and spin it over to spray any puddles of wd40 out so it doesent hydrolic with too much oil. hope she lives on :S

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Texas City, Texas
    Crank the boat up on the trailer with water. Grab the idle adjustment screw and turn it clockwise to get the rpm's up to about 4500 rpms and let it sit.

  9. #9
    Is it almost winter yet??? ProXR 440's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Macomb, MI
    You can run the ski on the hose for as long as you want without the motor overheating but you might cook the pump bearings. I would try to rig a hose spraying into the intake grate aiming back towards the prop to help keep the bearings cool.

  10. #10
    Where I'm at with this thing now:

    I can now get it to start although it's extremely rough. To get it to fire, I need to give it throttle while holding the start button. As I slowly release the throttle, the engine eventually sputters to life. The exhaust pours out significant amounts of smoke, although the premix I run has smoked even when the ski was running 100% (40:1 premix with riva controller).

    If I rev it around 2500-3000 rpm for a few minutes (with water pumping through, of course), it will idle rough for about 2 minutes then die. Ski will not idle on it's own at this point and is extremely rough running when I do run it. Engine is still allowing itself to rev reasonably freely. When I pull the plugs, the smell and look fine, a decent amount of oil buildup but that's to be assumed with the premix at idle.

    I have not put it in the water yet. Around 2 pm today (thursday), I should be able to get it to the water (boat sinking incident happened around 7 pm monday).

    1. According to what I've described, is there still hope for my engine or am I going to just get out into the water and need to get towed back when it dies on me?
    2. Assuming the engine has experienced a failure causing it to run so terribly, what sort of failure would be likely, and approximately what sort of repair costs should I expect for a shop to fix the issues and get it back running 100%.

    Thanks guys. Your help has really been a lifesaver with these issues.

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