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  1. #1

    Ultra 150 cheapest way to 70mph

    i got an ultra 150 and i think its time to do a few mods for speed,right now she will gps at 64.2mph,what are the cheapest mods that will get me to 70mph.i dont want to break the bank just want some real answers to the cheapest mods for 70. im at sealevel also and the ski is stock with 180 hours


  2. #2
    thesepaperwings's Avatar
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    Shredmaster, modded stock grate, modded stock sponsons, resistor temp mod, smoothing the plate and grate into place. Should get you in the 68 range at least.

  3. #3
    what about a new impeller will this ad to top end at all or is the stock impeller the best on top end?

  4. #4
    Connecticut CrazyA's Avatar
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    I know you're looking for the cheapest, but I happened to be reading this old article today and happened to see your post. If nothing else, it's good reading.

    Making the Fastest FASTER
    THE KAWASAKI JET SKI ULTRA 150 IS THE absolute-fastest production-model personal watercraft built to date to date being through the '99 model year, of course. Sure, the all-new GP1200 from Yamaha may be faster, but we won't know for certain until at least March, when we get our hands on a production model.

    But rather than wait until March for a faster production-model craft, we decided to go ahead and make our Ultra 150 a bit faster now. After all, the production-model GP1200R may not be faster than the Ultra 150 anyway. And while we've heard more than our fair share of stories about guys who have 70 mph Ultras, we've also heard our fair share of stories about them blowing up.

    The simplest, and most cost-effective way to increase the performance of the Ultra 150 is to put an in-line resistor in the engine compartment's temperature-sensor wire. What this does is modify the engine timing. While we have also been told (by reliable sources) that more than a few guys have blown up their engines after performing this little trick. It seems that some of them end up with too much advance and not enough fuel when using the stock CV carburetors and aftermarket flame arrestors in conjunction with a boost in compression and the in-line resistor. What happens is the motor gets too hot, resulting in a scattered engine ouch!

    So, rather than take a chance on blowing up our Ultra, we decided that we'd go with a setup that we've heard shows positive gains in performance without hindering reliability. The idea is to increase compression and fuel delivery, and to achieve these two objectives we'll be using an ADA Racing billet-aluminum cylinder head with replaceable combustion chamber domes and Buckshot Racing's 50mm BRM carb kit. We chose the ADA Racing cylinder head because it would allow us easily to raise and lower the cranking compression simply by swapping domes sizes. A couple of other reasons we chose the ADA head were its one-piece head-shell design, which ties all three of the Ultra's individual cylinders together, and its O-ring sealing, which eliminates the need for a head gasket. The ADA cylinder head, which is machined from a piece of 6061-T6 aluminum, uses the same proven water routing as the stock heads.

    One reason for choosing the Buckshot Racing fuel-induction system was because we had heard rumors that it worked well on the Ultra, and we wanted to find out first hand how well. Besides, Buckshot Racing owner Andrew Buck offered to bolt on the system (and the ADA Racing cylinder head) and join us out on the water for the test. This meant that not only would we not have to get our hands dirty, but we wouldn't have to drag the boats to the beach either. We need to do it this way more often!

    The Buckshot Racing BRM carburetor kit for the Ultra 150 comes complete with three Buckshot Racing billet-aluminum intake manifolds, three 50mm Buckshot Racing billet-aluminum Magnum carburetors with a single accelerator pump and a remote Mikuni fuel pump, all necessary throttle linkage, three Buckshot Racing Pro Lite Power Filters (flame arrestors), a Buckshot Racing fuel manifold and all necessary hardware, gaskets, fuel line and a throttle-cable bracket.

    We had ADA Racing ship the cylinder head to the palatial PWI headquarters in Costa Mesa, California. Upon the arrival of the cylinder head, Buck arranged to have our Ultra 150 and the ADA Racing cvylinder head picked up and taken to his shop in nearby

    Brea. Buck and his technician, Brian Carr, removed the Ultra's OE induction system prior to our showing up at the shop a few days later. Upon our arrival, Buck installed the ADA Racing cylinder-head setup while Carr installed the Buckshot Racing carb system. We looked on, clean hands and all. The ADA Racing cylinder head is a no brainer to install, however, Buck did manage to put the head shell on the wrong way the first time.

    While we didn't read the instructions that came with the head, it wouldn't really have mattered. While the instructions do tell you that the water routing is the same ads stock and that you must use the fittings from the stock cylinder heads, they do not warn you to be sure to install the head shell with the fittings on the exhaust-system side of the spark plugs. Even though this is how the stock heads are setup, it is an easy item to overlook when installing a new head. Because the ADA Racing cylinder head eliminates the two OE brackets that tie the stock cylinder head together, you also need to make sure that you install the thicker 8mm flat washers (supplied in the kit) and the 12 long OE cylinder-head studs. The studs are the inner studs that the two OE brackets use. The ADA Raving cylinder head does not allow you to retain the OE spark-plug cap grounding lugs.

    We told ADA Racing's Marv Wachendorf that we wanted to run about 150 psi of cranking compression, so he sent us 44cc domes with the head shell. The 44cc domes are designed to give the stock Ultra 150 approximately 145 psi of cranking compression according to Wachendorf. On our boat, the 44cc domes gave us just over 140 psi. While Buck was hoping for at least 150 psi of cranking compression, we were content at least for now. After all, in addition to making our Ultra faster, still being able to run pump gas was one of our primary concerns.

    As far as the carb setup goes, installation was straightforward. The Buckshot Ultra 150 BRM 50mm carb kit comes with everything needed for a completely bolt-on installation. Well, except for the fact that instructions weren't quite ready when we did our test. Luckily for us, Carr and Buck did all the wrenching while we looked on. Buck did say that the instructions for the Ultra 150 carb kit will be complete and included in the kits by the time you read this. In addition to the instructions, the carb kit will also come with Buckshot's own accelerator pump. Because of our lurking deadline, our kit came with a combination Mikuni-Buckshot Racing accelerator pump since Buck didn't have time to complete his production-model pump, The accelerator pump not only aids in off-idle acceleration, it also eliminates the need for a fuel primer to start the craft when cold.

    Although the Buckshot Racing Ultra 150 carburetor system is all bolt on, there is a modification that you have to make to the boat that is not. Actually, there are a couple of mods that you have to make. First of al, Buck recommends enlarging the air intakes on the Ultra's hood by cutting away a section of the inner hood liner on each side. For this you can use tin snips or basically anything that will cut thick plastic. In addition to modifying the inner liner, Buck also recommends modifying the front storage bucket. His trick here is to drill a bunch of 2 inch holes in it to increase the airflow to the engine. This is easily done with a drill motor and 2 inch hole saw. The only problem with this mod is that it will allow any smaller items that you might toss into the storage bucket to fall down into the hull.

    We were scheduled to test our Ultra with the ADA Racing cylinder head and Buckshot car system the following morning, but really high winds prevented us from doing so. After all, we were interested in really nothing more than what kind of speed we were going to get. Okay, we did care about the overall power band, but we were feelin" the need for speed!

    Due to the really high winds and the fact that Buck was going to the desert with his sand rail for a few days around New Year's we wouldn't get back out to the water until the following week.

    Finally, we made it. Our test locale of choice was a secret test site off the coast of Long Beach. As usual, we started with the acceleration and top speed runs while water conditions were flat and the air was cool. On this day the air temperature was hovering around 70 degrees.

    Riding the Ultra for the acceleration and speed runs was Expert Ski World Champion Chris Lawrence, while PWI edition Jeff Hain operated the radar gun and laptop. After our usual 10-plus runs (we like to be fair), the average top speed of our ADA Racing/Buckshot Racing modified Ultra 150 was 68.56 mph. For comparison's sake, the same Ultra in box-stick form had a to speed of 64.53 mph. Not a bad gain at all for just carbs and compression, right? Well, 4 mph for $1773.95 does seem a little steep, but when you consider what cylinder porting and triple pipes go for, it's not that bad. Besides, consider what you'll save at the gas pump not having to run race gas not to mention the fact that this combination seems to be completely reliable. If you don't mind not being able to adjust your compression ratio by simply swapping domes. Buckshot Racing will modify your stock cylinder heads for $50 with the purchase of its Ultra 150 BRM carb kit. While this will save you $325, we prefer the ADA Racing head. Besides offering interchangeable domes, it uses an all 0-ring sealing design, eliminating the need for a head gasket. Its one piece head-shell design also improves the rigidity of the engine. Best of all, it looks way tricker than the stock heads do.

    Acceleration of the modified Ultra 150 from idle to 20 mph took 1.37 seconds, or 0.34 seconds quicker than the boat did stock. From 20 to 35 mph, the modified Ultra had an acceleration time of 0.99 seconds compared to a time of 1.21 seconds for the craft in stock form. The idle to peak (68.56) mph time of the modified Ultra was 13.91 seconds. The boat took 11.09 seconds in stock form to get from idle to its peak speed of 64.53 mph. So not only did the cylinder-head and carb mods give us an increase of over 4 mph in top speed, they also improved the bottom-end and midrange acceleration of the craft as well.

    Wile I did not forget to bring along our revs on digital PET tachometer, we were able to sort of estimate an increase in rpm of 200-30the Ultra's stock LCD tach. In stock form, our boat turned 6m800 rpm according to the stock tachometer. In mod form, the Ultra looked to be turning 7,000-7,100 rpm on the OE tach.

    The additional speed did make our boat a little squirrelly at speed on the flat water, but we expected that it would, considering the fact that the sponsons are totally out of the water when at speed. And our boat, as some of you may remember from the aftermarket test "Ultra fit, Ultra tight, Ultra hip," in the December 1999 issue of PWI, is equipped with Beach House sponsons.

    Start-up of the modified Ultra was about perfect. Even when cold, all it took was a push of the green button. (Okay, so we did have to turn on the Ultra's magnetic key ignition and hook up the safety lanyard).

    About the only complaint we had with the performance of the modified boat was that every once in a while it would stumble off the line when we grabbed a handful of throttle. According to Buck, this problem wouldn't have occurred with slightly more compression, which he wanted in the first place. Buck likes to run at least 150 psi of cranking compression with his carb setup. We've experienced a similar sort of idle to WOT stumble out of the hole in the past when running big carbs without high compression. Fortunately, if your Ultra is a little low on compression like ours, ADA offers a variety of domes, including custom domes on request.

    Overall, the ADA Racing/Buckshot Racing modifications gave our Ultra about what we expected. While we'd heard rumors of a 70-mph top speed with these two mods, we didn't believe them. And that's really why we did the test in the first place. That, and we wanted to increase the speed of our Ultra 150 while keeping it reliable and running on pump gas. That's just what we accomplished

  5. #5
    btldigger's Avatar
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    Nice article. I got a set of those buckshot brm carbs. They work nice but changed them out for novi 48s. May want to check out the ultra mods thread at the top of this section. I got to 71 doing the things listed here.

  6. #6
    ok lets put it this way,can i hit 70 on gps for around 500-700 if so which would be the parts to get me there.

  7. #7
    Let me out of here......I need to go on Greenhulk!
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    O yea easy, pick up a set of used coffman triple pipes!

  8. #8
    btldigger's Avatar
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    you wont do it with tripples that cheap. You got to go with carbs to run those pipes. I would do the shredmaster plate, sponsons, 42cc heads, carb mod then do the free mods like trim and air. That would put you real close if you watch the details. Might also want to add a solas 16/20 or a repitched stock prop.

  9. #9
    thesepaperwings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by junny View Post
    ok lets put it this way,can i hit 70 on gps for around 500-700 if so which would be the parts to get me there.

    Fast answer is NO. The absolute cheapest way to hit 70 is to mod the carbs, airbox, Bigbore,heads, do exhaust port work, port the stock pipe, remove one baffle from the waterbox, mod stock plate, grate, sponsons, impeller. you can do all of these yourself and the only cost would be the pistons. The bad news is that if you new how to do these then you wouldn't have asked the question.

  10. #10
    so shredmaster - milled head - jetting and carbs - impeller

    these parts i am pretty sure i can do for well under 700 without a dout getting everything used over the winter on the forums or ebay.

    these sound like it will get me close to 70? i have hit 65.1 with quarter tank gas on really nice water this season so far.looking to get her to 70 by spring

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