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  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Torpoint, Cornwall, United Kingdom

    Advice on polaris sl 1050

    Hi everybody. I have been searching trying to find some info on a jet ski that i wanted to buy. I have been looking on ebay, and other places over past month for a jet ski. I came across a few that i like but my budget holds me back a little. I was going to get a sea doo 3 seater gts, i was thinking it would be more stable. But then i came across the polaris and i asked the guy if he would knock a few hundred quid of and he said yes. I am going to see the sea doo gts later today. But looks wise i much rather like the polaris. I have never riden a jet ski, i have a speed boat but i can imagine there is alot of difference between speed boat engine and jet ski engine. Why is it that a jet ski engine is considered old after 300 hours. I was planning to go all over the place on the one that i get. When i go buy the jet what do i need to look out for on both the polaris and the sea doo. The sea doo is a 1999 was at £1350 and the polaris is a 1997 was at £1100. I will have to spend an extra £200 in petrol picking up the polaris. I am only planning to use the jet ski with my partner. We are both very very skinny. So not a couple of fatties cramped onto a jet ski like some of the videos on youtube,lol. I heared that the polaris is a bit wild with 2 people on it. Does that mean we will be in the water more than being on the ski. Any help would be fab as dont want to buy a ski and have it go 'bang' while we are in the middle of the sea.

  2. #2
    urugol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Sydney, Australia
    Welcome to the hulk lad!

    If you are planning riding the English channel with your partner I would not recommend any 2 seater ski period. Much better going for a 3 seater you will need the additional stability, especially if its a first ski. Just my opinion having owned both. I'm not well versed in Seadoo but Polaris do have some great 3 seater options as well, you may want to widen your search. One thing for sure and certain is the polaris 1050 will blow the doors off the Seadoo you are referring to in terms of top speed and acceleration.

    300 hours is considered old if the engine has never had any work done. For a 2 stroke that's a pretty good innings. 2 Strokes are a LOT cheaper and easier to rebuild though. If you are buying a 300 hour ski that will give you some bargaining power if it hasn't been rebuilt. Search this site for tips on how to assess engine health, particularly doing a compression test before buying.

    Best of luck.

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    near Toronto, Canada
    PWC is very different from a boat.

    Check my signature links for lots of good info regarding buying a PWC and what to look for.

    In big water (the sea) you really need high reliability. An engine or other failure can easily strand you in the water. If you are far from shore or other help (or even not that far out if the shoreline is rough and univiting) an equipment failure can also become life threatening. There are multiple ways for these things to fail, right up to and including sudden sinking.

    Big water also means big waves and you want a hull designed to ride well in those conditions. Almost none of the two seater hulls ride well in rough water. The degree of pounding and bounce varies with the hull design and some folks like the small hulls for wave jumping and such. For any distance in big water riding the two seater hulls are a poor choice.

    Among the three seater hulls the best ones for rough water from Polaris are the MSX and the Genesis. The Virage is OK on the same water conditions (I have both Virage TXi and MSX 140).

    The _only_ way to achieve high reliability with these old machines (all Polaris are now 'old' along with all 2-stroke Seadoo) is to spend the time and the money to go over them thoroughly from end to end. Rebuild or replace _everything_ that needs it. Inspect everything (not just look at the parts from the outside). No exceptions.

    Riding with two machines (see my signature photo) provides a degree of safety in that if one machine fails you have a ride back home on the other, even if you must abandon one at sea. Each machine should be maintained to the same high level of reliability that you would demand if you were going out on it alone with no nearby support or backup.

    There is a real cost to achieving reliability and then maintaining these things at that high level. Money will be spent along with many hours of time, before you even get them wet for the first time.

    Take the time to read the available material linked below. It should get you started in the right direction.

  4. #4
    Banned User
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Milwaukee WI
    Well Put Keith!!!!! I know too many people out there who want to save a few bucks and let things go saying "well it works just fine now". Those are the ones who ultimately end up getting towed back.

  5. #5
    Puts motor oil on his pancakes Hockeydude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Grand Blanc, MI
    As stated before not many 2-seaters are good in chop, and terrible in big water especially with two riders. Even with 1 rider the Polaris has a very lively hull design that is fun for messing around but terrible for cruising in any kind of comfort in even the smallest of waves. If you HAD to choose between the two I'd take the Seadoo, your bum will thank you.
    On the other hand if you are young, can take a beating and would be going out yourself to have fun on the waves I'd take the Polaris

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