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  1. #1
    ripcuda's Avatar
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    MSX 110/150 - Weber engine - cam chain master link press tools?

    Hey Gang,
    I'm getting my MSX150 back together... albeit slowly. I need to press the master link on my cam chain. It isn't a hollow style you see on most chains. It's more the kind you have to mushroom or rivet.

    Anybody done this? The specialized Weber tool is $400+... which I can't afford for one master link.

    Anybody have any recommendations? Or can anyone rent me a tool to use?

    Oh... and there is no free-hanging part of the chain to use the wrap-around kind of chain tools. It's on the cam sprocket.

    Thanks!


  2. #2
    Kosh's Avatar
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    The way I do mine is to position the motor on it's side with a block of steel (sledge hammer or similar) supporting the cam/cam chain assembly and I deform the chain link with a punch. You need to position the punch off centre for both blows. The ones I have done you would not pick it from standard. Even if you don't have it looking original once it is deformed it is not coming undone. Just make sure the link is all the way home, use vise grips or similar to pull it into place.
    Happy punching

  3. #3
    ripcuda's Avatar
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    Thanks Kosh! I don't know why I didn't think of that.

    It took an extra set of hands (thx wifey) to press the steel block up against the back side of the masterlink. Then I was able to use a punch and hammer to mushroom the rivet head. Didn't look too bad either for a doitmyselfer like me.

    And thanks to Randy at WeberPower!
    He offered to come to my rescue with a possible loaner on the Polaris cam chain breaker/press tool.

    Cheers!

  4. #4

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    Good Job!!
    I have been trying to find a better "affordable" solution, and I have purchased at least (10) chain breakers & peen tools.
    I think I'm onto a solution, and hopefully will have something soon in the $50.00 range. The Kosh method is the best option, and seems to work fine! Just be careful not to compress the link too much.. Watch the chain as you rotate the engine, and make sure the link pivots freely. Always buy an extra link for your toolbox!!

    Best regartds,
    Randy

  5. #5

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    Using a hammer was a little too scary for me. I had great luck with a steel backing plate, a grade 8 bolt and a large c-clamp. The end of the pin mushroomed beautifully and it was in a nice controlled manner. Channel locks or vise grips do an excellent job at seating the links plate prior to rolling the pin ends. An old metal cloths hanger also worked nice when feeding the cam chain up and over the cam.

  6. #6
    Kosh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ride04msx View Post
    Using a hammer was a little too scary for me. I had great luck with a steel backing plate, a grade 8 bolt and a large c-clamp. The end of the pin mushroomed beautifully and it was in a nice controlled manner. Channel locks or vise grips do an excellent job at seating the links plate prior to rolling the pin ends. An old metal cloths hanger also worked nice when feeding the cam chain up and over the cam.

    I agree in principal, problem is when I post on alternative methods I and I guess others that also offer advice assume the some level of hand tool agility or mechanical sympathy. In reality in this instace someone elses tap or hit with a punch could indeed eject the whole camshaft and post assembly off the head! or just bend the sprocket.

    Possibly I should have a discalaimer in my signature, but what would be the fun in that
    Me, I like to read other peoples solutions some I like some I dont but still use

  7. #7
    hills1106's Avatar
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    Motion Pro make a good tool, havnt tried on a weber motor, but have had the same one for near 16yrs in my motorcycle shop. Easily avail at any bike shop, most are just chinese shit, but motion pro are great quality, and parts easily obtained (anvils/pins etc). Using a punch works but the Motion Pro tool is an easy 1 person tool, sort of like me

  8. #8
    ripcuda's Avatar
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    I looked at all the Motion Pro stuff that said it can rivet the master links. They all said "Will rivet hollow nose master links (will not rivet solid soft-nose pins)"... so I wasn't sure they would work. The master link on my motorcycle chain is hollow style like this
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The Weber master link is solid like this
    Click image for larger version. 

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    That said... I probably would have worked.
    Cheers!

  9. #9
    I am in the process of rebuilding a MSX 110 4-stroke engine. We used 2 hammers to mushroom the brads on the timing chain. Now our problem is getting the timing perfected. While we noted most of the engine positions as we disassembled the motor, we can not find our notes on the various alignments for the cam sprocket.

    Any one have notes on this??

  10. #10
    ripcuda's Avatar
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    Welcome to GH ScottSpivey!

    So you already installed the cam master link before you ensured proper camshaft alignment? Let's hope you got it right.

    I've got a good amount of experience aligning the camshaft and reinstalling the cam chain... since back years ago when this thread was started. I use the following diagram from the service manual.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Now if you didn't fully disassemble the engine/mag/flywheel (front of it)... then you won't be seeing the crank and counter shaft gears to align the dots... but since you never took them apart... they'll still be fine. And hopefully you didn't drop the cam chain down into the engine when you pulled the head. That can be pretty tricky getting it where it needs to be.

    So what I do... is put the MAG (front) piston to top-dead-center... using a wood dowel through the spark plug hole. Then using a known flat edge align the cam lobes so the flat edge laid across the tops of both is perfectly horizontal. You can gauge this off the cam towers with your flat edge. The chain should then fit into the cam sprocket grooves. Put in the master link (not the pressed plate yet) and carefully turn over the engine. When the PTO piston (rear) reaches TDC... it's two cam lobes should also be level across the top. Then rotate some more and check the MAG ones again. If it's all checking out as you see in the diagram. Press/peen the master link plate permanently on.

    Hope that helps. Feel free to ask any other questions... Maybe start a new thread telling us about your ski and whatnot.

    Cheers!

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