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  1. #1

    Polaris 1050 rear crank seal replacement, tips and info?

    Im limited on polaris experience. Im removing a 1050 engine from an older polaris(I believe a 95) to a newer 1998 SLT-X. The newer one I bought with a broken rear connecting rod. The engine out of the older ski the guy I got it from says it runs good, but had an electrical issue. Engine spins freely, looks great inside and after popping open the ebox the CDI is bubbled and smells burnt. I will be swapping the electrical over.

    My issue with the good engine is I have it out and I see the rear seal is quite rusty. i see it has a circlip and was wondering if its possible to just replace this rear seal and if there is any special tools to do this. Any info that would help me out doing this would be great. Everything seems compatiable between the two skis so far.
    Heres some pics of the skis Im working on.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Hmmm.

    There was no 1050 engine in 1995. The last two digits of the HIN on the donor hull should tell you the model year. The engine itself should have an engine code on it.

    The 1050 is a red domestic engine. I don't think you can remove and re-install a rear crank seal without splitting the engine crank case halves, which means also releasing the cylinder stud nuts. The retaining ring can be removed with a strong application of removal pliers, but the seal itself has a lip that sits into a groove in the crank case.
    [Correction: the new style seals have the locating ridge. The old style seal has no ridge, it is instead clamped between two metal retaining rings.]

    The entire flywheel and housing must also be removed before the case halves can be split.

    Once you are that far into the engine, you might as well also replace the rear crank bearings, and the front crank bearings. The original single lip style rear seal can be replaced with the newer style double lip seal. These two seals go into the grooves of the original retaining rings, which are then omitted.
    Last edited by K447; 02-11-2013 at 08:58 AM. Reason: Retaining rings on old style seals, no retaining rings with double rear crank seals

  3. #3
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    Actually I'm pretty sure the seal on that motor isn't in a groove. Its held in place between the two retaining rings. It still won't come out without splitting the cases though. When you torque down the case bolts, it squeezes the seal between the case halves. The rust you are seeing is probably just the clip.

  4. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Bryan is correct, the original style domestic engine rear crank seal does not have a locating ridge. It is locked in place between two retaining rings.

    The first two photos are from an SBT rebuilt SL900 engine which chewed up the single rear seal and then the rear crank bearings degraded and failed.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Below is the newer double seal arrangement.


  5. #5
    Thanks for the excellent info on this. It does look like the rust is mainly from the clip. But it worrys me, still not sure on my next move. Ideally id like to replace seals. i dont want to risk a bad seal causing it to run lean.

    When you say releasing the cylinder stud nuts, can you just release those nuts, turn the engine upside down and remove lower case half and change the seals like that? Basically with out pulling the cylinders and having to replace base gaskets. Ill grab a pic of the rust tonight and post it up to see what you guys think.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davy87nj View Post
    Thanks for the excellent info on this. It does look like the rust is mainly from the clip. But it worrys me, still not sure on my next move. Ideally id like to replace seals. i dont want to risk a bad seal causing it to run lean.
    You are right to be concerned, and the engine is out now so this is your opportunity to have some peace of mind. You should at minimum pull the heads and inspect your wash pattern. That will reveal if you have a lean condition or not, post some pics and the guys here will help you out. You can also use this opportunity to check your cylinder bores for any scoring. When removing the heads be prepared to replace the orings, there's 6 of them in all. I would also do a comp test on a bench to get an initial reading before you do anything. You can also pressure test your engine to ensure all seals are tight, like I said the engine is out now is the time for proper maintenance.

  7. #7
    Those freaking cylinder head covers for the cooling area(the red things) are a pain to get off, at least it was on the engine with a bad connection rod. I inspected cylinders pretty carefully through the exhaust port, still has nice hatch markings from the last machine work(possibly orig, but i doubt it). No scoring, no blow by. I will do a compression test asap. Makes sense to verify this engine is legit before doing all the work to put it in and have a failure. Any one make a pressure testing kit for a 1050 engine?

  8. #8
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    If you are at all concerned about the seals, now is the time to replace them. Get a gasket kit and the seals and tear it down. Should cost around 100 bucks to do it.

  9. #9
    Yeah, I think I will. here is some pics of the rear seal area. Also some pics of the burn pattern in order 1 2 3.
    Front piston has much more carbon build up than the other two. Burn pattern looks correct on the 2 and 3 cylinders to me.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #10
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    pull the heads and have a look

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