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  1. #1
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Arrow How to convert 1999-2001 Polaris Ficht throttle body to upgraded 'pigtail style' TPS

    This is not quite a complete documentation (yet).

    What I did was modify an older non-pigtail type Genesis throttle body (2001?) to fit the now updated pigtail type TPS, part number 2202740

    The essence of the modification is that the TPS actuating 'lever" is mounted onto the flat sided end of the throttle shaft. Removing the lever assembly allows the pigtail TPS to mount right up onto the exposed shaft end, very similar to how the OEM 2002-2004 Ficht throttle bodies are configured.

    I apologize for the corrosion, this is what this old throttle body looked like when I got it, and it has been sitting in inventory ever since.
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    You can see the plastic nub on the arm of the TPS and the metal lever arm that moves it when the throttle shaft rotates. That plastic nub is critical if you are still using the non-pigtail type TPS.

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    Here the TPS is at full throttle, about 85 degrees rotation from idle (just guessing, from memory ).

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    Remove the retaining nut and it all comes off the end of the throttle shaft.
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    For comparison this is a 2004 throttle body that came OEM with the pigtail TPS. The shaft end is very similar, minus the threads for the retaining nut.

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    Note the clip in a groove around the shaft. That groove is not present on the older throttle bodies.

    Note: I did not have the tools handy to accurately measure the angle of the shaft flats. It is possible the newer throttle shafts have a slightly different idle angle than the older throttle shafts. This of course would affect the idle output voltage from the retrofitted TPS.
    Last edited by K447; 11-14-2013 at 02:22 AM.


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    For this demonstration I re-used an early pigtail TPS (actually several) to confirm the mechanical fit and electrical performance (more on the electrical a bit later).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Always be careful with the torque on the mounting screws. You do not want to crush or crack the casing on the TPS. Moisture will kill the TPS if the case sealing is violated.

    I did not actually measure the mounting post dimensions between new and old throttle bodies to determine if there was an actual mechanical difference. They all look really similar.

    I found that a pair of thin washers between TPS and the throttle body mounts helped keep the TPS aligned with the end of the shaft and in one test case the washers reduced binding when the throttle shaft was turning. Try it both with and without the washers to see if the washers are helpful.
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    Note that when the pig-tail style TPS is installed the location of the tension spring is critical. You must hold both the spring end and the TPS in position while you get the screws started.
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    While we are comparing old and new throttle bodies, here you can see the change in the oil hose nipples. Right angle on the early model, angled circa 2002-2004.
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    All these Ficht throttle bodies seem to be repurposed Bing carburetor castings. With no carburetor innards, of course.

    More interesting is that the air bleed holes through the throttle blades are larger on the older throttle body. This is related to the stratified lean/clean combustion method that Ficht uses below about 5500RPM.
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  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    The throttle cable end does not seem to have changed over the years.


    Another comparison of early vs late model TPS locations. Subtle differences in the castings.

    You can see the lower TPS mounting boss is larger on the new version.

    Hence the need for washers to better hold the TPS in position. Remember when the engine is running the TPS is getting a heavy duty shaking and vibration. If the TPS starts wobbling it is not going to work properly for long.


    The newer throttle body version (angled oil feed nipple on the outside) has the oil drip hole visible just below the throttle plate.
    The older version has an oil actual feed probe sticking into the air flow.


    Closer view of the difference in throttle plates.

    Left to right;
    2004 MSX 140 2002 Genesis i 2001 Genesis i
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    Last edited by K447; 07-25-2016 at 07:40 AM.

  4. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    This is the aspect I am not entirely comfortable with. I have some more notes to review and will edit this section later, as needed.

    All my testing so far was done using throttle bodies sitting on a test bench. No engine heat, and especially no engine vibration.

    My understanding of the EMM is that the raw TPS input signal to the EMM is internally filtered and sampled such that the EMM can ignore minor voltage variations caused by slightly different TPS mountings, slight tolerance differences from one TPS to another, and TPS output changes that are transients caused by vibration.

    As best I can tell the EMM also tries to self adjust to the currently installed TPS signal and determine what voltage this particular TPS is providing when the throttle is sitting at idle position.

    I do not know what the range limits are for the EMM's ability to recognize and compensate for differences in the TPS idle voltage.

    My reading of the Ficht specification is that the TPS should ideally deliver about .350 volts when the throttle is at idle.

    Note that the Ficht throttle bodies do not have an idle adjustment screw. The throttle plates are all the way closed at idle. The engine breathes via the holes in the throttle plates.

    What I found was that the original non-pigtail TPS would deliver idle voltages from right around .350 volts up to maybe .460 volts. This varied depending on how gently or quickly I let the throttle snap closed, and just generally was a little different each time the throttle was opened and closed.

    With the newer style pig-tail TPS retrofitted to the old throttle body the voltage variations were somewhat larger and generally stayed above .350 volts. I measured idle position voltages as high as .575 volts.

    It would be interesting to monitor the actual TPS voltages while installed on a running engine, both OEM pig-tail (2002-2004) and 1999-2001 models retrofitted to pig-tail. I suspect the vibration may help the TPS settle back against the shaft friction and possibly report lower or more consistent idle voltages with the engine running.

    Despite the difference in measured idle position voltages all the TPS configurations I tested measured very close to the same 4.6 volts at wide open throttle position.




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    Last edited by K447; 07-25-2016 at 07:43 AM.

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    I used a simple 5.0 volt DC source to power the TPS during these tests. On the watercraft the EMM provides an isolated and regulated 5 volt power feed just for the TPS.

    On my test bench I used a USB power pack
    USB power packs are inexpensive, voltage regulated and current limited. And widely available.

    Don't use your computer for this, go get an actual USB power pack. Even a brand new high grade one from Apple (which is what I used for my testing) is not that expensive. And you can use it for charging your iPhone later

    I cut the end off a spare USB cable to get at the wires. Don't cut off the wrong end!
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    In the USB cable Black is negative, Red is +5 volts. Ignore the other two wires. Use your multi-meter to confirm the correct voltage and polarity.

    If you want to replicate this for testing your own TPS, make sure you get the voltage polarity correct to the TPS.

    I used a simple screw terminal strip to link the USB cord to the TPS stub harness. I stole the TPS connector and wires from an old Ficht wire harness. The three pin Weatherpack connector that mates with the TPS is also available new from various online sources.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Green is the TPS output signal.
    Black is negative and also where the black meter probe connects.
    Red is the 5 volt DC power feed to the TPS.


    The old/original TPS designs were just a sealed potentiometer and could be tested using an ohmmeter (although the resistance readings could not tell you if it was actually 'good').

    The current TPS are electronic and use a Hall Effect sensor. That means the only way to test them on the bench is to power the TPS with 5 volts and see what voltages come back out from the TPS.

    Mind you, I have not actually pried the very newest TPS version open to see what is actually inside since it is new and will cost money to replace...

    An important point to mention is that on a workbench, without engine heat and vibration, and without high humidity and presence of moisture found inside a hull, a TPS can seem to test just fine. Yet when actually mounted on a running engine that same TPS can be all over the map and no good at all.

    If the TPS tests BAD on the test bench, either you are testing it wrong or it is indeed bad.

    Going through my own collection of 'should be good, but previously used' TPS I found two that actually were bad. Both had incorrect output voltages, one at idle position was delivering nearly 2 volts, the other at full throttle was barely 3 volts output.

    However, if it tests good on the bench, it may still be BAD when on the engine.

  6. #6

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    So did you ever do a real live test on a machine? Results?

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigE View Post
    ... did you ever do a real live test on a machine?
    I have not.

  8. #8

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    Do you know of anyone who has put the newer setup including throttle body on a 2001 virage txi?

  9. #9
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigE View Post
    Do you know of anyone who has put the newer setup including throttle body on a 2001 virage txi?
    Changing the entire throttle body along with the TPS from non-pigtail to pigtail style is straightforward. The mechanical differences are fairly minor, I do not imagine you would have a problem.

  10. #10

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    oil lines are different as K447 showed in his pics but all else is the same

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