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  1. #1

    1996 SLTX 1050 middle and front cylinder HOT HELP!

    1996 Polaris SLTX 1050

    Perfect compression all cylinders, has been running good on water.

    Last time out the cylinders started to get hot, I think I sucked it some debris.

    Anyways I am at home trying to make sure there isn't a cooling system clog up.

    SO I noticed that with the hose attached, my rear cylinder stays cool, but the middle and front are getting much hotter.

    All 3 cylinders are firing I ran each by itself to make sure.

    But the middle and front are much hotter than the rear???

    Where do I start testing? I pulled the water bar on-top of the cylinders to make sure it was not clogged, it looks fine, I ran water through it.

    I am thinking water isn't getting through the middle and front cylinders somehow, or they are running lean?

    HELP!

    Thanks.


  2. #2
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    If you are running on the hose those 2 cylinders will get hot. Run it in the water and see if its any different. I bet its fine. Good time to pull the thermostat and popoff valve in the water rail and make sure its all working properly.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by BryanP View Post
    If you are running on the hose those 2 cylinders will get hot. Run it in the water and see if its any different. I bet its fine. Good time to pull the thermostat and popoff valve in the water rail and make sure its all working properly.
    OK well if when running on the hose its normal for the rear cylinder to be much cooler then I will disregard that symptom.

    So yes I was thinking the thermostat. I pulled it and dropped it in boiling water and it didn't open so that's the problem.

    Whats the pop-off valve?

    I am just going to leave the thermostat out. Should I leave the plastic piece with thins in thought? (is this the pop off valve?)

    I hope I didn't damage my engine with that thermostat being stuck closed, my friend was on the ski today and he wouldn't know to look for any high temp warning ect. only rode for 20 mins.

    Ski still starts right up and I did a compression test and its still 130 across the board, so I am hoping I will be OK?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Polarisitis loonatik's Avatar
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    While on the hose, you could pinch the hose that goes from water rail to rear of the ski to help circulate the water all the way to front cylinder.

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shogangp View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BryanP View Post
    If you are running on the hose those 2 cylinders will get hot. Run it in the water and see if its any different. I bet its fine. Good time to pull the thermostat and popoff valve in the water rail and make sure its all working properly.
    OK well if when running on the hose its normal for the rear cylinder to be much cooler then I will disregard that symptom.

    So yes I was thinking the thermostat. I pulled it and dropped it in boiling water and it didn't open so that's the problem.

    Whats the pop-off valve?

    I am just going to leave the thermostat out. Should I leave the plastic piece with thins in thought? (is this the pop off valve?) ...
    The thermostat should open right around 140F in a pot on the stovetop. It takes a minute or so to open as the water temp warms in the pot. You can use a meat thermometer probe to monitor the water temp as it heated.

    The spring loaded pressure bypass valve sits beside the thermostat in the thermostat housing. When the engine RPM goes up the water pressure into the cooling system from the jet pump also goes up. This pushes the pressure bypass valve open and increase water flow through the engine.

    So at medium to high RPM the engine gets proper cooling regardless of the thermostat being open or closed.

    At low RPM is when the thermostat alone is in control of engine temperature.

    If you run without the thermostat then the water will always be flowing at near maximum circulation so the engine will tend to warm up slowly and run below optimum temp at low RPM.

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