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  1. #1

    1992 650 Sl Buzzer

    Hi, I just bought a couple Sl 650's the other day. One runs, one has a blown piston. I think the one that runs has a 93 engine. I was riding it one day and there was a buzzer that started going off, so I drove it back to the dock and figured it was over heating. Later, I took out the thermostat and tried it out, no buzzer, so I figured it was a faulty thermostat. Now today I started it and instantly the buzzer started going off, I stupidly made a circle to see if it would shut off, but it possibly just blew a piston, not sure though. I thought that buzzer only went off for over heating or low oil in the tank, but it must be something else too. I know it wasn't over heating, because it started buzzing as soon as I hit the starter. It has lots of oil BTW. Any advice is appreciated.


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Possibly blew a piston? What makes you think that?

    Check cylinder compression. All spark plugs out, throttle held wide open.

  3. #3
    BlueFishCrisis's Avatar
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    The buzzer is provided +12 volts from the LR module from the ebox the moment the engine starts. It does not, however, receive the - 12 volts it needs to sound until either the oil sender reads empty, or the temp sensor reads overheat. On the 93, the temp sensor has two leads. One black, one tan. The tan lead connects to the buzzer, while the black lead connects to the oil sensor. The buzzer also has three leads, one from +12 volts, one tan from the temp sensor, and one blue from the oil sender. I am not familiar with how the black travels through the temp sensor to provide a ground to the oil sender, but it would seem that either the oil sender would need to be tested to ensure it is reading properly, and that the temp sensor is only completing the circuit when heated properly. I would suspect one or the other is bad, or that there is a short to ground on the ground wire between the ebox and the buzzer.....

  4. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    The engine temperature sensor provides the ground connection for both the temp sensor and the oil level sender. The temp sensor is directly contacting the engine metal, which is the ground connection.

    The oil tank is plastic so it needs a ground connection from somewhere else. That is why the oil sender connects to the temp sender, for the ground connection.

    If the buzzer activates when the cold engine is first started then one or more of the following is true;
    Oil level is too low or oil sender is not working properly
    Blue wire is shorted to ground somewhere, possibly frayed wire rubbing on the engine
    Engine temp sensor is defective, shorted to engine ground
    Tan wire is shorted to ground somewhere, possibly frayed wire rubbing on the engine.

  5. #5
    Alright, so the reason I thought it blew a piston was because it lost power pretty much instantly, but now I see, and felt after I grabbed it without thinking that the spark plug wire came off the boot. I also found those black and brown wires, they were laying in the bottom, cut off from where ever they go to. So if I am using my head right, the intermittent buzzer I had was because the wires would touch the engine every once in a while? What should I do with the loose wires? Tape them off? Or try to reconnect them?

  6. #6
    BlueFishCrisis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
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    The engine temperature sensor provides the ground connection for both the temp sensor and the oil level sender. The temp sensor is directly contacting the engine metal, which is the ground connection.

    The oil tank is plastic so it needs a ground connection from somewhere else. That is why the oil sender connects to the temp sender, for the ground connection.

    If the buzzer activates when the cold engine is first started then one or more of the following is true;
    Oil level is too low or oil sender is not working properly
    Blue wire is shorted to ground somewhere, possibly frayed wire rubbing on the engine
    Engine temp sensor is defective, shorted to engine ground
    Tan wire is shorted to ground somewhere, possibly frayed wire rubbing on the engine.
    This wiring setup would seem to indicate that the Oil sender then effectively acts as a simple open/closed switch, vs a graduated impedance varying device.

    93 oil sender:

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    94 and on:

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    Make sure you have the right type installed as the latter version would provide a signal to ground, just reduced / impeded based on the oil level in the tank. The buzzer will likely operate on less than 12v if a lower voltage were presented, just perhaps not as loud.

  7. #7
    BlueFishCrisis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kylerding View Post
    Alright, so the reason I thought it blew a piston was because it lost power pretty much instantly, but now I see, and felt after I grabbed it without thinking that the spark plug wire came off the boot. I also found those black and brown wires, they were laying in the bottom, cut off from where ever they go to. So if I am using my head right, the intermittent buzzer I had was because the wires would touch the engine every once in a while? What should I do with the loose wires? Tape them off? Or try to reconnect them?
    I would reconnect them. The buzzer is the only safety you have for an overheat condition, before death that is....

  8. #8
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueFishCrisis View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
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    The engine temperature sensor provides the ground connection for both the temp sensor and the oil level sender. The temp sensor is directly contacting the engine metal, which is the ground connection.

    The oil tank is plastic so it needs a ground connection from somewhere else. That is why the oil sender connects to the temp sender, for the ground connection.

    ...
    This wiring setup would seem to indicate that the [1992-1993, part number 4110126] Oil sender then effectively acts as a simple open/closed switch, vs a graduated resistance varying device.

    1993 oil sender:

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    1994 and on:

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Name:	oil sender 94.JPG 
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ID:	341838

    Make sure you have the right type installed as the latter version would provide a signal to ground, just reduced / impeded based on the oil level in the tank. The buzzer will likely operate on less than 12v if a lower voltage were presented, just perhaps not as loud.
    On watercraft with the buzzer, all the input signals will be switches, not resistances.
    Switch Off=good/quiet
    Switch ON=buzzer sounding

    Your observation regarding the resistance style 'newer' sender causing trouble when used with a buzzer alarm is correct. The buzzer cannot be used with a resistance type sender.

    To verify which sender type you have, compare with the photos above.

    You can also verify by unplugging the oil sender and connecting the two wires to an ohm meter.
    A variable resistance type oil sender will read anywhere between 33 ohms and 240 ohms, depending on the float position.

    A switch type oil level sender will measure either open circuit (infinite/extremely high ohms) or it will measure closed/short (very low ohms) between the wires. This is the only sender type that can be used with a buzzer annunciator.

  9. #9
    I am pretty sure it is the 93 version, that is what it looks like to me.

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