Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 50
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    58
    +1
    2

    Lifespan of a Triton torsion suspension.

    I have a 2006 Triton Elite 2 place trailer with about 15,000 miles. Does anyone know what the lifespan is for the corded rubber part of the axle. I have always carried 3 seat Seadoos and am currently carrying 2 RXT 260's. The trailer still rides great but I am wondering if at some point the torsion suspension will suddenly fail without warning due to age and/or number of miles on it. Thanks


  2. #2
    r33pwrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Sammamish Washington
    Posts
    4,216
    +1
    360
    My friends boat trailer just lost a torsion axle while 300 miles from home... Over a thousand dollar bill 😞 I would just replace it at those miles / age.

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,591
    +1
    1,275
    How expensive is a replacement torsion axle?

    You could call Triton and ask them about failure risk due to age or mileage.

    Or call the axle manufacturer. Brand and model info should be stamped on the axle.

    I have a 2008 Triton Elite double trailer with torsion axle. It never occurred to me that the OEM rubber type torsion axle lifespan would be anything less than 'a very long time'.
    Last edited by K447; 09-16-2014 at 10:36 PM.

  4. #4
    r33pwrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Sammamish Washington
    Posts
    4,216
    +1
    360
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    How expensive is a replacement torsion axle?

    You could call Triton and ask them about failure risk due to age or mileage.

    Or call the axle manufacturer. Brand and model info should be stamped on the axle.

    I have a 2008 Triton Elite double trailer with torsion axle. It never occurred to me that the OEM rubber type torsion axle lifespan would be anything less than 'a very long time'.
    they are rubber... like everything else they will fail. I would just keep an eye on it and make sure you don't notice any sagging. My friends was on a tandem axle trailer and he said he thought it rode lower on the one side before the failure (he told me this after it failed). His was expensive because of the tow and 2nd day shipping on a new axle. One nice thing about leaf springs is roadside repairs are usually pretty easy if they fail... a torsion not so much. BUt that being said torsions should last a very ling time.

    I take back my earlier comment, I would not be overly worried but keep an eye on it for sure.

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,591
    +1
    1,275
    Indeed, some remedial Internet education shows that eventually a rubber corded torsion axle can lose its ability to flex or will begin to sag under loaded weight.

    Measuring the original trailer frame height and then periodically re-measuring would be one way to tell when the axle sag becomes significant. Of course this varies with the amount of actual weight on the trailer, so careful notes must be kept.

    Another method is to monitor the angle of the axle arm relative to the frame rail. An aging torsion axle will allow the arm to rise farther when just sitting under load, reducing the angle relative to the frame.

    When the trailer frame is jacked up, a badly aged rubber torsion axle will not allow the tire to stay on the ground for the first few inches of frame lift.

    I am guessing that the real world typical lifespan of the torsion axle under a Triton watercraft trailer is measured in decades.

    A friend has a 1997 Triton Elite double (stored outside year round) that I have towed a few times in recent years, sometimes for fairly long distances. I noticed nothing unusual about the ride height of the trailer and it handled the PWC weight without issue. That trailer is now eighteen years old. Not a huge amount of road miles, however.

    I would think frequent greasing of the wheel bearings and periodic checks of the hub bearings would be the primary concern with a high mileage trailer.

    If the tires on that 2006 trailer are original then it is time for replacements, regardless of remaining tread. Eight years is over the hill for trailer tires.

    Replace the spare tire too, as it is mostly time and exposure that degrade trailer tires, not road miles.
    Last edited by K447; 09-17-2014 at 12:44 AM.

  6. #6
    cheatin' piston popper addicted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    north jersey
    Posts
    6,188
    +1
    176
    its rubber and it will fail eventually, but look for unusual wear on the tires as an indicator. Remember that the rubber chords also set the alignment.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles Area
    Posts
    480
    +1
    27
    Hi guys I was thinking about buying a single Torsion Triton. Do even the new ones have this rubber part that can fail?

  8. #8
    Xspook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Space coast, FL (Brevard County)
    Posts
    937
    +1
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by superjetpilot View Post
    Hi guys I was thinking about buying a single Torsion Triton. Do even the new ones have this rubber part that can fail?
    As far as I know, all torsion axles have the rubber cord - that's what makes them torsion.

    Here's a very nice video that explains how they work:



    http://www.completetrailers.com/the-...e-demystified/

  9. +1 by:


  10. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles Area
    Posts
    480
    +1
    27
    Thanks for the vid and link. Now I'm not so sure it's worth getting the axle if I have to worry about fixing it at some point.

  11. #10
    cheatin' piston popper addicted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    north jersey
    Posts
    6,188
    +1
    176
    all suspension parts are a wear item. that being said, you will probably sell the trailer long before any failure, leaf or torsion spring.

    IMHO, torsion axles are very nice, but a waste of money if you are only towing short distances, and completely useless on a single trailer, unless you are towing with something that is borderline capable of handling the loaded trailer, such as towing an ultra300 with a small car.

  12. +1 by:


Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Lifespan Of 4 Stroke Yamaha Vx Sport?
    By stoyan79 in forum Yamaha PWC Performance (4-stroke)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-05-2014, 02:00 PM
  2. FS Triton Trailer w/ Torsion suspension. Dallas Fort Worth
    By meirvin in forum Trailer Classifieds
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-19-2012, 08:14 PM
  3. What's the lifespan of a GP1200 engine?
    By ericheavner in forum Yamaha How To & FAQs
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-06-2008, 09:43 PM
  4. Price of a Triton Elite WC-II?
    By Piraya33 in forum Towing and Trailers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-20-2008, 09:00 AM
  5. Lifespan Of 4 Stroke Yamaha Vx Sport?
    By stoyan79 in forum Yamaha Open Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-07-2007, 02:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •