Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    22

    Fuel Additive and Fuel Stabilizer - Do I Need These?

    tl;dr - what oil should I be using and do I need to add anything else to the oil or gas (additives, stabilizer)? How much and how often do I need to do this?


    I've been reading through all the stickies for the last two weeks, and most of it goes right over my head. I'm not mechanically inclined and I'm sure the reason I couldn't find the answer to my question is because it's a dumb question that everyone knows the answer to so it's never been posted.

    I just purchased two skis, a 93 SL750 and a 94 SL750. The previous owner took great care of them from what I can tell. I'm hoping to get them out on the lake next weekend and was looking online at Yamalube 2M Marine 2-Stroke Oil NMMA TC-W3 Gallon because the seller said I'd need to add some. The seller told me he always used Yamaha or Kawasaki oil, and recommended I stick with those over the generic stuff. As I was looking at this, it recommended two other products and I'm wondering if I should be using these or not.

    Yamalube-Fuel Stabilizer & Conditioner Plus and Yamaha Yamalube Ring Free Plus Fuel Additive ACC-RNGFR-PL-12

    Again, I realize this may be the dumbest question ever asked on this site, but I literally have no clue and after all the reading I've done, I'm terrified that I'll use the wrong stuff and damage my new toys. I used the search feature, but couldn't find anything that answered this (I found many threads where people were debating which brand was best, but nothing to help a noob like myself). I'm assuming there will be instructions on the bottle after I order it, but if there's anything special I need to do or consider for these machines, I'd love to hear it. Thanks, and try not to beat me up too much, I'm learning.


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,576
    +1
    1,272

    Arrow What octane grade gasoline should I use, what about fuel stabilizer?

    Welcome

    In addition to the sticky threads in the various forums, be sure to look through my signature links.

    The only time fuel stabilizer is needed is if the machine is going to be in storage or sitting unused for an extended period of time. Personally, I would add fuel stabilizer if the watercraft is going to be sitting for more than a month, or if I just do not know when it will next be used.

    Each time you use the machine and then add fresh fuel, the ratio of old fuel to fresh is refreshed. The more old fuel you burn and then replace the fresher the overall tankful will be.

    It is common practice before extended storage for guys to ride the tank to near empty, then refill with non-ethanol premium grade gasoline and add a full dose of fuel stabilizer. Ethanol blended gasoline tends to degrade more rapidly in storage, but there are fuel stabilizer products intended to work with ethanol which hopefully reduces the degradation.

    One of the ways gasoline degrades over time is the effective octane level declines, which is why premium grade gasoline is preferred.

    The recommended minimum octane grade for Polaris engines is 89 octane. The 87 octane minimum specified in the original owner's manuals refers to non-ethanol non-oxygenated straight gasoline, which is no longer widely available.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    22
    Thank you very much. I've been through much of your site and found some helpful articles. As I mentioned, a lot of it goes over my head but I'm sure I'll be spending more time on your site as I start learning to repair my skis.

    It sounds like the stabilizer isn't neccessary as long as I'm using this regularly (I may add some just to be safe because I don't know how often we'll be using these - I'm hoping we're on the lake every weekend, but have never owned water toys so we'll have to wait and see). What is your opinion on the additive? Amazon suggested it when I put the oil in my cart, and I found a few threads here saying that it's helpful. I guess I just wanted to make sure that this is the right kind of additive for my skis? It sounds like 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines require different types and I don't want to screw that up.

    Thank you so much for helping out here, and sharing some of your thoughts on this. I know it can be annoying when new guys show up and ask a bunch of dumb questions (especially if the questions have been answered on the forum already).

  4. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,576
    +1
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by BYUFan View Post
    tl;dr - what oil should I be using and do I need to add anything else to the oil or gas (additives, stabilizer)? How much and how often do I need to do this?

    ...
    I just purchased two skis, a 1993 SL750 and a 1994 SL750. The previous owner took great care of them from what I can tell. I'm hoping to get them out on the lake next weekend and was looking online at Yamalube 2M Marine 2-Stroke Oil NMMA TC-W3 Gallon because the seller said I'd need to add some. The seller told me he always used Yamaha or Kawasaki oil, and recommended I stick with those over the generic stuff.

    As I was looking at this, it recommended two other products and I'm wondering if I should be using these or not.

    Yamalube-Fuel Stabilizer & Conditioner Plus and Yamaha Yamalube Ring Free Plus Fuel Additive ACC-RNGFR-PL-12

    ... I'm terrified that I'll use the wrong stuff and damage my new toys. I used the search feature, but couldn't find anything that answered this (I found many threads where people were debating which brand was best, but nothing to help a noob like myself). ... if there's anything special I need to do or consider for these machines, I'd love to hear it.

    Thanks, and try not to beat me up too much, I'm learning.
    No beatings will occur

    Way back when these machines were new, the only relevant oil specification was TC-W3, a standard created by the NMMA (a marine boat industry group). TC-W3 is actually an old oil grade intended for use on outboard 2-stroke engines. Outboard engines tend to run at lower peak RPM than these watercraft and produce less horsepower for the same engine size. Consider your engine to be a high output 2-stroke.

    Oil technology has greatly improved since the early days and modern high quality 2-stroke oils are quite impressive. It is common now for very good oils to not actually be tested against the ancient TC-W3 method as it just is not very useful.

    The Yamalube and Kawasaki 2-stroke oils are quite good, no problem with quality.

    For your purposes there are two types of 2-stroke oil, ashless and low-ash. The 'ash' is effectively a type of lubricant carried within the oil. The only downside is that some 2-stroke engines with movable exhaust power valves can get stuck if the oil leaves residue behind. Not a concern with your engines which do not have power valves in the exhaust.

    That same residue can sometimes accumulate around and behind the piston rings, causing them to get stuck in the groves around each piston. Sticking rings lead to engine wear and reduced engine power, hence the Yamaha Ring-Free product. In general for your engines this is not a major concern as long as you use a good quality oil.

    Where are you located? Within the US northeast I prefer the Legend brand ZX-2R oil, available online and from some powersports dealers.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    22
    Thank you again, this is very helpful. I'm in Utah, these will mostly be used at Deer Creek Reservoir and occasionally at some reservoirs in southern Utah (Sand Hollow, Quail Creek).

    I paid $1,500 for two skis and the trailer and I'm hoping to get 2-3 summers out of them before having any major issues. I have young kids and they are so excited to get out and enjoy these. I don't plan on spending much on upgrades, just want to take these out and have some fun with the family (although I'm already looking at all the custom seats, decals, etc. and trying to convince myself to not spend my money on that stuff).

  6. #6
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,576
    +1
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by BYUFan View Post
    Thank you very much. I've been through much of your site and found some helpful articles. As I mentioned, a lot of it goes over my head but I'm sure I'll be spending more time on your site as I start learning to repair my skis.

    It sounds like the stabilizer isn't neccessary as long as I'm using this regularly (I may add some just to be safe because I don't know how often we'll be using these - I'm hoping we're on the lake every weekend, but have never owned water toys so we'll have to wait and see). What is your opinion on the additive? Amazon suggested it when I put the oil in my cart, and I found a few threads here saying that it's helpful. I guess I just wanted to make sure that this is the right kind of additive for my skis? It sounds like 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines require different types and I don't want to screw that up.

    Thank you so much for helping out here, and sharing some of your thoughts on this. I know it can be annoying when new guys show up and ask a bunch of dumb questions (especially if the questions have been answered on the forum already).
    Fuel stabilizer is not expensive and no harm in adding it more often than 'necessary' It does not take a lot to stabilize a full tank. I keep a fairly large bottle on the garage shelf, easy to splash a 'dose' into the fuel filler if I think the machines may be left sitting for a while.

    No other additives needed.

    As you will read in my links, the best way to make these machines reliable is to do the maintenance and checks up front. Do not wait until something goes wrong. Not only is stranding on the water no fun, it can be dangerous if it happens at a bad time or in a poor location.

    Do not be in a hurry to 'test ride' on the water. Even if the machines look clean and seem to run fine on the trailer, it can be hard to tell if everything is actually in good working order. Some owners really do know everything that needs attention, but many owners only pay attention to specific aspects and ignore or are unaware of other maintenance items.

    Keep in mind that these machines are over twenty years old now. Rubber seals age and harden, bearings wear and sometimes begin to rust. Hoses become brittle or abrade from rubbing on the vibrating engine. Carburetors slowly accumulate gummy gasoline deposits and 'varnish' and the rubber parts inside age

    A couple of examples;
    The bearing assembly where the driveshaft goes through the hull from the engine compartment out to the jet pump. That through-hull bearing is supposed to be greased every so often, but the factory grease fitting is not a common zerk type, so it doesn't look like a grease fitting. If it was not regularly greased then it is likely the bushings inside have become worn.

    Even if it was greased, there are rubber shaft seals on both ends that become worn with use and time. Since these seals are what keeps water from leaking into the hull, it is common to remove the bearing assembly and replace the original seals. And check that the bushings are not worn. The seals are not expensive or hard to replace.

    The very early Polaris fuel tanks have short sections of fuel hose inside the fuel tank. Eventually these hoses rot and fall apart, leading to trouble running the engine properly as the fuel supply is compromised. If the original hoses are still in there they are long overdue for replacement.

    Later model years used an all metal fuel pickup and sender assembly, so no hose pieces inside the fuel tank.

    Regarding fuel hoses, the original Tempo brand gray fuel hoses are known to degrade on the inside and create a greenish goop that eventually clogs the carburetors. If the fuel hoses are original, all should be replaced. AND the carburetors should be removed, internally cleaned and rebuilt. There are tiny fuel filters inside the carburetors, which if they become clogged, can cause all sorts of troubles.

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,576
    +1
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by BYUFan View Post
    ... I'm hoping to get 2-3 summers out of them before having any major issues.

    I have young kids and they are so excited to get out and enjoy these. I don't plan on spending much on upgrades, just want to take these out and have some fun with the family ...
    It is not about upgrades, it is about reliability.

    The only thing thats makes these old watercraft reliable is taking the time and effort to make them that way. You cannot 'test' them into becoming reliable.

    It is not uncommon for a new owner to take their new-to-them but actually rather old PWC out on the water, then experience a failure. It can happen within minutes, within hours, or perhaps weeks or months later. You cannot choose where it will fail or when. Getting stranded on the water is no fun and having passengers makes it more so. Even just looking under the seat is near impossible with passengers aboard.

    Without a thorough inspection it is just guesswork as to the actual internal condition of various aspects of the machine.

    I do not want to sound excessively negative, but we have seen it occur many times over the years. I have personally had a seemingly well running watercraft completely flood with water in mere minutes with no prior warning. I was only on it for five minutes before it failed, yet the owner had been riding it for hours over multiple days just prior. The through-hull bearing had not been inspected, and it suddenly failed completely while at speed. Fortunately another PWC was nearby and able to provide a tow, and I had no passengers.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    22
    Thank you, it sounds like I need to start pulling things apart and pray that I'm able to put it back together. My neighbor races dirt bikes and is always working on engines in his garage so I'm probably gonna get to know him much better.

  9. #9
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    near Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    36,576
    +1
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by BYUFan View Post
    ... I need to start pulling things apart and pray that I'm able to put it back together.

    My neighbor races dirt bikes and is always working on engines in his garage so I'm probably gonna get to know him much better.
    Both of you should have a look here

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    22
    One more question - it's not fuel related, but I didn't want to start a new thread for my dumb questions. The trailer that my skis came on (yacht club, 2 ski trailer) doesn't have winches, the skis are just connected with a pin. I'm wondering if this is standard on older trailers, or if I need to go buy some winches and attach them.

    Without a winch, I'd imagine I have to drive the ski all the way up and risk damaging the nose. Or, back the trailer further in the water so I can push the skis up, but then they'd be floating and probably be difficult to center (and possibly bang into each other).

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. When do I need an EFI fuel controller?
    By rossnemo in forum Yamaha PWC Performance (2-stroke)
    Replies: 202
    Last Post: 08-06-2017, 10:24 PM
  2. F15x: what kind of fuel pressure do I need to run @15-16psi?
    By walkdog311 in forum Honda Performance
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-03-2016, 11:36 PM
  3. New impeller and wear ring do in need a new wear ring??
    By Rxp_speedracer in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-01-2016, 05:01 PM
  4. 2001 LRV (how many feet of fuel line do I need to replace?)
    By macGruber in forum 2-Stroke Performance
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-20-2013, 01:47 PM
  5. Do I need more fuel either 42 #ers or a RRRFPR?
    By cfnnslsq in forum 4-Tec Performance
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-09-2008, 09:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •