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  1. #1

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    MSX 140 anode replacement???

    Does anyone have a suggestion for replacing a 2003 MSX 140 anode?
    Polaris part numbers 5630598 & 2200745 are unavailable. I run the MSX in fresh water only. Any help would be great.

    Chuck


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    What condition is the existing anode?

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    The anode is pretty bad. I have attached picture to this post.
    Chuck
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  4. #4
    Resident electronics hacker UnityRacing's Avatar
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    Wow.
    Hope it did it's job and your pump looks good.

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    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrChuck View Post
    The anode is pretty bad. I have attached picture to this post.
    Chuck
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	357890Click image for larger version. 

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    Was this machine previously used in salt or brackish waters?

    Typically on fresh water the anode looks nearly new even after a decade or more.

    I have not checked the Polaris OEM online stores. If the part is really not available new then you may be able to find one used in good condition. Even if you have to buy an entire used jet pump base the anode from a fresh water machine should be quite usable.

    Have a look in the Polaris Classifieds on Greenhulk. Might find someone parting out a jet pump that would be willing to pull the anode off.

  6. #6

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    The previous owner used the jet ski in salt water. The anode did its job. The pump is in good condition but the anode is shot. I currently only use it in fresh. I found some good information at the following web site.

    http://www.performancemetals.com/anodes/AnodeFAQs.shtml

    Any thoughts? I know that I will probably have to make my own at this point. Question is which material?
    Chuck

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrChuck View Post
    The previous owner used the jet ski in salt water. The anode did its job. The pump is in good condition but the anode is shot. I currently only use it in fresh. I found some good information at the following web site.

    http://www.performancemetals.com/anodes/AnodeFAQs.shtml

    Any thoughts? I know that I will probably have to make my own at this point. Question is which material?
    Chuck
    My (perhaps incomplete) understanding is that the anode must be magnesium or zinc since it is protecting the aluminum jet pump.

    The Navalloy product looks like it would also work.

    Since the anode is a simple hunk of metal, you can cut down a larger anode as necessary to make it fit the space.

    What metals are sacrificial anodes made from?A. The three most active materials used in sacrificial anodes are zinc, aluminum and magnesium. They have different properties and uses.
    The first property to consider is their electrical potential. All metals generate a negative voltage (as compared to a reference electrode) when immersed in water. The lower – the more negative - the voltage, the more active the metal is considered to be, for example:
    Magnesium generates -1.6 Volts, i.e. negative 1.6 volts.
    Aluminum sacrificial anode alloy generates -1.1Volts
    Zinc, -1.05 Volts
    In order to provide protection, the highest practicable voltage difference possible is required between the sacrificial anode and the metal to be protected.
    For example, if zinc is used to protect a bronze propeller, a “driving or protecting voltage” of negative –0.75 volts will be available, i.e. zinc at -1.05 volts minus bronze at -0.3 = - 0.75 volts.
    If aluminum anodes are used this increases to -0.8 Volts.
    Magnesium anodes increase this to -1.3 volts.
    The bigger the difference in voltage, the more protection you get...
    If you can find an anode intended for some other PWC or marine application, as long as you can get it to bolt up and it is made from the necessary material it should work properly.

    Fresh water is much less aggressive than salty water so you have some wiggle room.

  8. #8
    Resident electronics hacker UnityRacing's Avatar
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    Probably cheaper and easier to find a used pump base on ebay. I wouldn't think the bases are a hot commodity, and should be easy to find.

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