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  1. #1

    1100 Crankshaft (PTO SIDE) crank bearing installation



    Hey guys

    I have a big dumb question - how do you get the crankshaft bearing on -on the PTO side?

    The shop that I took my crankshaft too called and said they don't have a big enough press to get the new bearing on.

    can I just line it up and tap it on using a piece of hollow PVC or similar?

    Out of options. thanks for the help.
    Thanks

    -Brett N


  2. #2
    Back to the top.

    Alright - plight continues. Turns out that the shop couldn't get the old bearing race off! Can I heat it with a propane torch and see if it will expand enough to get it off or should I try a different shop?

    I'm still trying to figure out how to get a new one on - wondering if I freeze the crank if the new bearing will slip on and then tighten up as the crank re-expands

    Any other ideas?

    _BN

  3. #3
    ....back from the dead.... J-ME's Avatar
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    You can use some localized heat to try to get it off.


    To install, find yourself a socket or something that supports the inner race (and is deep enough) and drive it on. (if a press is not avail)

    Freezing the crank should help abit.

  4. #4

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    The big problem is geting the old race off. We install new press fit bearings all the time with a bearing heater, an electrical magnetic heater that heats it almost smoking hot, then it slides right on. You have to move quick and not mess up, but they slide right on. You can heat those bearings in an oven to 300 or 350 and it will expand enough to go on.
    When you hear about how they true a crank by hitting it with a hammer, it makes you think twice about beating a bearing on.

  5. #5
    Thanks Guys...

    see my next (new post) about the bearings....I'm going to try a different shop tomorrow though.

  6. #6
    just an update on my crank bearing dilema and a note of caution....

    This is all on a low hour ( less than 10 hours) Hot Rods crank assembly.

    Took it into the other shop - turns out that the original bearing was not pressed on correctly and was slightly off line vertically. When the guy got the original bearing off, he had to turn the crankshaft on a lathe to cut the material off the crank that the race left on due to being pressed on wrong. Bearing was allowing the crank to wobble slightly, and this threw the everything off.....

    fixed, up and running, now I jut need to get on the water to break this in.

  7. #7
    TRIPLE PIPES ARE 2-STROKE TURBOS allcool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bnovak View Post


    The shop that I took my crankshaft too called and said they don't have a big enough press to get the new bearing on.

    can I just line it up and tap it on using a piece of hollow PVC or similar?

    -Brett N
    Something does not sound right aT ALL... not questioning you, but what you were told by your 'crank shop'

    Who is the shop doing your work.

    A spoon type bearing remover is used so as not to put any stress on the bearing webs and knock it out of true. This will remove the whole bearing in one piece and not leave the center race on the shaft if used correctly.

    Never hammer a PTO bearing on.
    Most rear pto bearings will slide right on after 20-30 seconds of being heated with a simple propane torch on the bearing center race only.

    Quote Originally Posted by bnovak View Post
    Took it into the other shop - turns out that the original bearing was not pressed on correctly and was slightly off line vertically. When the guy got the original bearing off, he had to turn the crankshaft on a lathe to cut the material off the crank that the race left on due to being pressed on wrong. Bearing was allowing the crank to wobble slightly, and this threw the everything off.....

    fixed, up and running, now I jut need to get on the water to break this in.
    Confused here... do you mean the bearing was installed crooked???
    Because no way a bearing can be installed crooked on the crank pin.

    Now if you mean the bearing was not put on all the way down, meaning it did not get seated to the bottom of the pin, then I understand. However, if the bearing was not seated in the right place on the shaft then the locating rings on the bearing would not line up correctly in the cases and when putting the crank in the cases this should have been noticed.

    If a crank seal or crank bearing locator rings or dowel pins are not installed/seated correctly, then when assembling an air leak is almost certain.

    You should also notice how the case halves don't quite fit together all the way and snap together tightly on their dowel pins. A pressure test would show a leak if the cases did not go together right.

    As long as the bearing locator rings and dowel pins seat in the cases properly and nothing is 'forced to fit' then the crank bearings where put on correctly.

    I am concerned about your newly assembled engine that had the bearing race remove on a lathe...
    Did crank get checked for run-out before final assembly???
    Did engine get pressure tested after final assembly???

    allcool

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by allcool View Post
    Something does not sound right aT ALL... not questioning you, but what you were told by your 'crank shop'

    Who is the shop doing your work.

    A spoon type bearing remover is used so as not to put any stress on the bearing webs and knock it out of true. This will remove the whole bearing in one piece and not leave the center race on the shaft if used correctly.

    Never hammer a PTO bearing on.
    Most rear pto bearings will slide right on after 20-30 seconds of being heated with a simple propane torch on the bearing center race only.



    Confused here... do you mean the bearing was installed crooked???
    Because no way a bearing can be installed crooked on the crank pin.

    Now if you mean the bearing was not put on all the way down, meaning it did not get seated to the bottom of the pin, then I understand. However, if the bearing was not seated in the right place on the shaft then the locating rings on the bearing would not line up correctly in the cases and when putting the crank in the cases this should have been noticed.

    If a crank seal or crank bearing locator rings or dowel pins are not installed/seated correctly, then when assembling an air leak is almost certain.

    You should also notice how the case halves don't quite fit together all the way and snap together tightly on their dowel pins. A pressure test would show a leak if the cases did not go together right.

    As long as the bearing locator rings and dowel pins seat in the cases properly and nothing is 'forced to fit' then the crank bearings where put on correctly.

    I am concerned about your newly assembled engine that had the bearing race remove on a lathe...
    Did crank get checked for run-out before final assembly???
    Did engine get pressure tested after final assembly???

    allcool
    the bearing race WAS NOT removed with a lathe - it was pulled off with a bearing press & bearing remover plate (not sure what the "Technical" term is )

    however, the excess material that the race left behind was removed with a lathe - basically, they cleaned up the shaft so that the new bearing would fit. Crank was then checked for run out, and engine was pressure tested. Holds 6PSI no problem.


    the new bearing went on no problem with a little heat, and there was no problems when re-assembling the engine itself. Everything fit like a glove and sealed up well.
    Last edited by bnovak; 10-22-2007 at 03:17 PM.

  9. #9
    It does sound goofy! And you can bet I would have had a hot rods rep involved it this! it doesn't seem possible to press fit a bearing off angle? it just seems like having a bad bearing would be more likely? and ps your making me nervous I have 10 hrs on mine but I did check mine on v blocks and pressure tested so I hope I'm ok? Z

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ZMANN View Post
    It does sound goofy! And you can bet I would have had a hot rods rep involved it this! it doesn't seem possible to press fit a bearing off angle? it just seems like having a bad bearing would be more likely? and ps your making me nervous I have 10 hrs on mine but I did check mine on v blocks and pressure tested so I hope I'm ok? Z

    Yeah it is kind of weird. I never thought to get HotRods involved as this came to me in pieces already.

    With enough vigor though, it might be possible to pound a bearing on off angle. Generally the bearing race material is not hardened like the HR cranks are (they are shot peened from what I understand) so there is a chance that with enough force, you could get the bearing race to distort.

    Who knows. All I know now is that it isn't leaking, turns smooth and has good compression. Next trick is getting it back on the trailer and into the water for some break in!

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