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  1. #1

    Sacrificial anodes on pump housings

    I noticed in my repair manual that all pump housings have a sacrificial anode fitted to the exterior of the housing (on older Polaris ski's, mine is a 98 SLXH) that prevent corrosion of the jet pump. When they corrode is it completely necessary to get them replaced, and how do you go about replacing them? I can't find a part number, or even what they look like.


  2. #2
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    5630598ANODE-ZINC Substituted by 2200745

    Number 38 in the photo and it just gets screwed into place.
    http://parts.polarisind.com/Assemblies.asp

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrYsTaLiZeD View Post
    I noticed in my repair manual that all pump housings have a sacrificial anode fitted to the exterior of the housing (on older Polaris ski's, mine is a 98 SLXH) that prevent corrosion of the jet pump. When they corrode is it completely necessary to get them replaced, and how do you go about replacing them? I can't find a part number, or even what they look like.
    Picture is from a 2002 Virage, but should be the same location on your 1998 SLXH; Left side of pump, near the front of the jet pump tunnel.

    Part 38 KIT,ANODE,(94-95) 2200745 (replaces 5630598 )

    The sacrificial anode (made of magnesium, I think) should be replaced well before it is completely gone. In fact, it is not effective unless it is tightly clamped to the pump housing. Tight enough to maintain an electrical connection to the pump body metal.

    It protects the boat metal components though chemistry, but the effect is that of a weak battery, hence the need for a solid, electrically conductive connection to the pump body.

    The water is the electrolyte of the battery, the aluminum and other metal boat parts act as the battery cathode, and the sacrificial anode is the battery anode, which gets eroded as the electric current flows. The effect is to actually slowly build up the metal thickness on the cathodic components, so over time, a very small amount of additional metal is layered onto the aluminum and stainless steel parts, while the anode gets eaten away.

    If you did not have the sacrificial anode in place (or it just wasn't tightly mounted), then the next most anodic metal on the boat would be eaten away instead. That would be the aluminum parts - not good.
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  4. #4
    in reality different water types IE brakish/salt / fresh etc should dictate the anode's composition but in this case there is only 1 choice! just out of curiosity what type of water do you boat in? and do you leave it in the water for long periods of time? thanks Z

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    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZMANN View Post
    in reality different water types IE brakish/salt / fresh etc should dictate the anode's composition ...
    What would the preferred anode materials be for the three common water types?
    Salt water
    Brackish water
    Fresh water

  6. #6
    Here is a quick link http://www.boatzincs.com/mercruiser.html but this has been discussed in many of the boating publications I read, you kind of figure it makes sense because you want the anode to be the toasties to the water type but it needs to last a while ! some people even drop anode fish overboard and bond them to the drives at anchor if I moored my pwc in a specific water type I would custom make my anode to suit Z
    Last edited by ZMANN; 01-22-2008 at 06:31 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ZMANN View Post
    in reality different water types IE brakish/salt / fresh etc should dictate the anode's composition but in this case there is only 1 choice! just out of curiosity what type of water do you boat in? and do you leave it in the water for long periods of time? thanks Z
    i'm boating in salt water - The craft never hit salt water (atleast I'm told that by the previous owner) so an anode replacment might not be a bad idea. Heres what mine looks like...
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  8. #8
    looks ok to me! you can always file /scrape them down to expose more raw material Z

  9. #9
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Anodic protection materials vs. water type

    Quote Originally Posted by ZMANN View Post
    ... http://www.boatzincs.com/mercruiser.html but this has been discussed in many of the boating publications I read, you kind of figure it makes sense because you want the anode to be the toasties to the water type but it needs to last a while! some people even drop anode fish overboard and bond them to the drives at anchor if I moored my pwc in a specific water type I would custom make my anode to suit Z
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    What would the preferred anode materials be for the three common water types?
    I learn something new almost every day...

    Here is my summary of what I have just learned - please correct any errors you see!

    Salt water; High water conductivity means the anode doesn't need to create a large voltage differential to protect the cathodic metals. A Zinc anode would protect the SS, but not the aluminum parts. A Magnesium anode will provide aggressive protection, but rather rapid anode decay if the boat is left in salt water.

    Brackish water; Similar to salt water, but the protection zone around a given anode material will be smaller.

    Fresh water; Since fresh water is much less electrically conductive, magnesium is necessary to create sufficient galvanic current to protect the cathodic materials (Aluminum and Stainless Steel).

    In a PWC with a plastic hull, the only significant metal outside the hull is the jet drive. The water closely surrounds the drive assembly and the protective anode, which is made of painted Aluminum and Stainless Steel. The paint covering reduces the amount of metal exposed to the water, which reduces the demand on the anode.

    The short duration of time the PWC spends in the water means that the magnesium anode does not corrode at a great rate, unless the boat was regularly docked in a salt water environment.

    If you remove the paint from the jet drive, the anode will be consumed more rapidly, since it must protect more active surface area. If the anode is lost or stops working (loose mounting), the aluminum parts will sacrifice themselves to save the SS parts.

    If you connect the internal wiring of the boat to AC electrical ground, perhaps to charge a battery, you are potentially increasing the protective burden on the sacrificial anode, especially if other electrically grounded metal objects nearby are also in contact with the water (such as steel dock support posts).
    Last edited by K447; 01-23-2008 at 01:15 PM.

  10. #10
    I think you now know what I know! I picked all the info up when I bought my big boat! lucky for me corrosion is not an issue

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