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  1. #1
    Will work on YOUR ski for FREE! GeoRXT's Avatar
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    Fuel saving tips...

    I think some of us need the best tips out there for this!

    I started slowing down on the highway....I usually do 80mph...On my last fill up I dcided to go 70mph until it went empty....that alone gave me 52+ miles on the tank....


    What else can be done besides proper psi on the tires and regular oil change intervals...?


  2. #2
    Dont judge me...
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    make sure you get as much done as you can on one trip.....

    Or Stop driving.....or just bend over and take it like a man!!!!

  3. #3
    JFizzleJR's Avatar
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    make slow transitions through the RPM range (acceleration and deceleration)..avoid frequent stops/starts if possible. basically, drive like a grandma.

  4. #4
    cbrich's Avatar
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    Stay at home as much as possible.

    If I could get another 2-4 mpg out of my truck I would be a happy camper.

  5. #5
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    1. Check your air filter

    A clean air filter is the key to good fuel economy. A dirty air filter restricts the flow of air into the engine, which harms performance and economy. Air filters are easy to check and change; remove the filter and hold it up to the sun. If you can't see light coming through it, you need a new one. Consider a K&N or similar "permanent" filter which is cleaned rather than changed; they are much less restrictive than throw-away paper filters, plus they're better for the environment.

    2. Check your tire pressure

    Next to the air fitler, under-inflated tires are one of the most commonly ignored causes of crummy MPG. Buy a reliable tire gauge, check your tires when they are cold (driving the car warms up the tires and the air inside them, increasing the pressure), and keep them properly inflated. Use the inflation pressures shown in the owner's manual or on the data plate in the driver's door jamb.

    3. Slow down

    As speed increases, fuel economy decreases exponentially. If you one of the "ten-over on the freeway" set, try driving the speed limit for a few days. You'll save a lot of fuel and your journey won't take much longer. Just be sure you keep to the right, so you won't impede the less-enlightened.

    4. Hang with the trucks

    Ever notice how, in bad traffic jams, cars seem to constantly speed up and slow down, while trucks tend to roll along at the same leisurely pace? A constant speed keeps shifting to a minimum -- important to those who have to wrangle with those ten-speed truck transmissions -- but it also aids economy, as it takes much more fuel to get a vehicle moving than it does to keep it moving. Rolling with the big rigs saves fuel (and aggravation).

    5. Accelerate with care

    Jack-rabbit starts are an obvious fuel-waster - but that doesn't mean you should crawl away from every light. If you drive an automatic, accelerate moderately so the transmission can shift up into the higher gears. Stick-shifters should shift early to keep the revs down, but don't lug the engine -- downshift if you need to accelerate. Keep an eye well down the road for potential slowdowns. If you accelerate to speed then have to brake right away, that's wasted fuel.

    6. Get back to nature

    Consider shutting off the air conditioner, opening the windows and enjoying the breeze. It may be a tad warmer, but at lower speeds you'll save fuel. That said, at higher speeds the A/C may be more efficient than the wind resistance from open windows and sunroof. If I'm going someplace where arriving sweaty and smelly could be a problem, I bring an extra shirt and leave early so I'll have time for a quick change.

    7. Back off the bling

    New wheels and tires may look cool, and they can certainly improve handling. But if they are wider than the stock tires, chances are they'll create more rolling resistance and decrease fuel economy. If you upgrade your wheels and tires, keep the old ones. I have fancy sport rims and aggressive tires on my own car, but I keep the stock wheels with a good narrower-tread performance tire in the garage. For long road trips, the stock wheels give a smoother ride and better economy.

    8. Clean out your car

    The more weight your car has to haul, the more gas it needs to do the work. If you're the type who takes a leisurely attitude towards car cleanliness -- and I definitely fall into that group -- periodically go through your car and see what can be tossed out or brought into the house. It doesn't take much to acquire an extra 40 or 50 lbs. of stuff.

    9. Out with the new, in with the old

    Many people keep their old cars around even after they buy a new one. A spare car, especially if it's an econobox, can be good insurance against temporary spikes in gas prices due to world events. The costs of keeping the car may or may not be less then the fuel saved, but it does allow for more predictability in your budget. My old beater doesn't look like much, but it goes 10 miles further on a gallon of gas than our regular car. For that, I can afford to look bad!

    10. Don't drive

    Not a popular thing to say on a car site, I know, but the fact is that if you can avoid driving, you'll save gas. Take the train, carpool, and consolidate your shopping trips. Walking or biking is good for your wallet and your health. And before you get in your car, always ask yourself: "Is this trip really necessary?"

  6. #6
    I've been told pulling thru for parking spaces (to stay outta reverse) saves a noticiable amount if constantly done... change your air filter to a K&N if you don't live in a dust bowl...

  7. #7
    Sorry to semi-jack the thread, but this is a great one! I've got a 2000 ext cab 3.0L ford V6 (150hp/150trq) and an auto trans (50K miles). I love it (it's paid for!), but it sucks gas pretty decently for not having a ton of power... I'm talking 18 on the highway and 12 to 14 in the city/pulling a trailer. The fact it's paid for helps greatly! What are you guys seeing in mpg/what do you have?

    I've done all the maintance and from what I've read this is normal mpg.

  8. #8
    cbrich's Avatar
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    I have a 99 Silverado 2500 get anywhere from 10-12 mpg in the city, and 13-14 on the highway. I have just replaced the factory O2 sensors with some new ones, the factory ones only had 320,000 miles on them. I did notice a difference in the way the engine idled and ran, no more knocking under a load, and the exhaust does not smell like unburned fuel. I had a K&N kit on my truck, but end up taking it off did not even notice a MPG change. My truck is in the bodyshop for work but can't wait to get it back to check the mileage.

  9. #9
    cbrich's Avatar
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    Replace sensors if your car has a lot miles on it like mine.

  10. #10
    cheatin' piston popper addicted's Avatar
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    Switching to all synthetic lubes in the driveline will help too. I gained almost 2mpg average on my jeep.

    I'm an amsoil dealer, so pm me if you have any questions about it.

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