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  1. #1

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    question about quiting a job

    i pretty sure i have a new job. when i quit my old job i want to leave on good terms as i have a really good reputation there as it is and if something doesnt work out at the new one i could go back. the thing is that i have 2 weeks vacation. one week i will get paid for when i leave the other one i will not. would it be bad forum to give my 2 week notice and then ask for a week off?


    the thing im most excited about is not the pay raise(which is about 6 bucks an hour more) im getting but the fact that ill have a 3 minute commute to work instead of 30 minutes LOL
    Last edited by stingray152003; 05-31-2008 at 08:01 AM.


  2. #2
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    • Be sure you’re making the right choice. Sometimes that dream job isn’t. Do what you can to give it a “test-drive” first. (Often this isn’t possible.) I know a man who quit his job last fall, but was back within a week.
    • Get your story straight. Don’t lie, but be sparing with the details. It’s fine to say why you’re leaving, but don’t let emotion lead you into revealing too much.
    • Write your resignation letter. Again, stick to the facts. Emurse has some sample resignation letters and some advice: “Resignation letters can be as much or as little as you would like. Keep them positive and remember that the end goal is to maintain a positive relationship with the employer.”
    • Tell your supervisor first. Follow chain of command. Telling your buddies first can cause repercussions. (Is this true?)
    • Be prepared for a counter-offer if it a competitive company. You may be a valuable part of the company’s plan, and they may attempt to get you to stay. This is one reason it’s important not to lie about why you’re leaving.
    • Stay for your two-weeks notice. Don’t leave your current company in the lurch. It puts them in a tough spot and looks bad to your new boss. Give the company time to replace you.
    • Work out your transition plan. The more you can help our company train your replacement, the better it reflects on you. I’m spending months helping to ease the transition as I leave the box factory. This is good for everyone.
    • Leave in good standing. It’s easy to mentally check out of your job long before you’re actually physically gone. Resist that urge. Remain diligent to the end.
    Give Appropriate Notice

    Be sure to provide your employer with the amount of notice that is considered standard for your position. Typically, this is two weeks. However, many management positions will require (or professionally request) that you provide a month or even two. Be aware of what your employer expects and give them as much time as you possibly can.

    Work Hard in Your Last Days

    Once you give notice that you are quitting, the people in your office will likely grow a bit distant. Most people belief that someone leaving will stop putting out their full effort. It’s natural to have the desire to not work as hard because your vision becomes very short sighted. You stop feeling that your work will result in reward. However, it’s important to continue working hard (even harder perhaps) in your final days to show that you are committed to fulfilling your obligations.

    Make the Transition of Tasks Smooth

    If you do certain tasks that no one else knows how to do, offer to train another employee prior to leaving. Otherwise, you will leave your former co-workers in a tight spot after you’re gone. Consider creating a “survival guide” for the person who will be your replacement. Make notes with tips and tricks you have learned along the way. It will be greatly appreciated by the entire office.

    Remain Positive

    Whether you’re excited about your new job or just happy to be quitting your existing position, keep the focus on positivity. Others in the office will be sad and mad to see you go, but you don’t have to let it get you down. Focus on the future and keep the present pleasant.

    Good Luck in your new job !! I bet the shorter commute is exhilarating in itself !

    .
    .
    Last edited by RX951; 05-31-2008 at 08:13 AM.

  3. #3
    flyin' the friendly skies airbornexp's Avatar
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    In most cases, no. How cool are you with your boss? If you work the two weeks will they pay you for your vacation time not used? You can always tell the new job that you can start 7-10 days after you leave the old job...just dont tell them that.

  4. #4
    r33pwrd's Avatar
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    In Washington they MUST pay you for your PTO / Vacation time that you have.

  5. #5
    Moderator OsideBill's Avatar
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    I will speak from experience here as I have been through something similar.

    Rule #1

    If you want to leave the door open give as much notice as you possibly can. I gave my former employer 3-1/2 weeks notice, It would have been a months notice if my Boss had not been out a couple days.

    Give a profesional letter of resignation. There should be nothing negative in this. Thank them for the opportunity they gave you. Make sure they know you are leaving for all the right reasons.

    Work your behind off to the last day. Leave nothing undone, make sure they understand that you are available for them should they have any questions after you leave. in other words leave a good impression on them.

    Now about the vacation time. The law says if you have accrued vacation you get paid for it when you leave. Sounds to me like some of this is either sick pay or PTO (paid time off) leave it, walk away from it, do not appear petty, this will leave a bad impression.

    Now I said I speak from experience. I left a good job I worked at for seven years. I left to get involved in a start up company that had great potential. After leaving I actualy returned on a couple occasions to my former employer and spent some working on a couple projects I was involved with. I supported them several times on the phone with questions they had. Well needless to say the start up company did nothing but consume all my time, I worked 80 plus hour weeks and it never really paid off like it was supposed to. I decided it was not the best decision I had ever made. My former employer contacted me wondering what it would take to get me back, fortunately for me I had left a good enough impression with them and they still had a need for me. I went back and it was a truely good decision. had I not left profesionly this opportunity would not have existed.

    my $.02

    Edit: BTW I have been back for two weeks now.
    Last edited by OsideBill; 05-31-2008 at 08:40 AM.

  6. #6

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    thanks guys ill guess ill just lose it. its what we call personal holiday and it could be used how every we wanted and we were gifted 3 days a year and i didnt use it the last 3 years. pretty much you can use it for vacation or emergency or a family thing with out any type of penalty. i rather lose the vacation time and leave on a good note then take it and not be able to go back. i plan on working 100% till my last day they really keep track of your prod and new i was sorta on my way out the door this has been a very long interview process started back in February.

    Although im not crazy about my current job lot of pressure to produce they have been very good to me and i have very little complaints if the pay was the same i might not leave just as i been there for a few years. but the fact ill be making more starting out here then i am at my current job which im toped out in, the commute and the fact that there is very little to no room for advancement which is another really big thing for me is what made me look for a new job.

    just for reference you need a 4 year degree to move up to the next level at target which is a GL and( not really a problem as im working on it) which would bump my pay up to 52k the first year ill be at ge ill make a minimum of 52k. to move up the next step at target which is a SGL you need a masters unsure of the pay.



    Im leaving target distribution to go work for General Electric (GE)

    thanks for the advice guys.
    Last edited by stingray152003; 05-31-2008 at 09:04 AM.

  7. #7
    Dave Sharp dav_dman's Avatar
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    Perfect.
    Also, Target dist is growing, but retail is iffy for the next 12mos..
    yet GE is selling off appliances unit so you dont want to be in dist of any of those parts or pcs...

    best of luck and osidebill's advice is sage.

    I'm director of distribution for several brands so I know of what i speak.

    Quote Originally Posted by OsideBill View Post
    I will speak from experience here as I have been through something similar.

    Rule #1

    If you want to leave the door open give as much notice as you possibly can. I gave my former employer 3-1/2 weeks notice, It would have been a months notice if my Boss had not been out a couple days.

    Give a profesional letter of resignation. There should be nothing negative in this. Thank them for the opportunity they gave you. Make sure they know you are leaving for all the right reasons.

    Work your behind off to the last day. Leave nothing undone, make sure they understand that you are available for them should they have any questions after you leave. in other words leave a good impression on them.

    Now about the vacation time. The law says if you have accrued vacation you get paid for it when you leave. Sounds to me like some of this is either sick pay or PTO (paid time off) leave it, walk away from it, do not appear petty, this will leave a bad impression.

    Now I said I speak from experience. I left a good job I worked at for seven years. I left to get involved in a start up company that had great potential. After leaving I actualy returned on a couple occasions to my former employer and spent some working on a couple projects I was involved with. I supported them several times on the phone with questions they had. Well needless to say the start up company did nothing but consume all my time, I worked 80 plus hour weeks and it never really paid off like it was supposed to. I decided it was not the best decision I had ever made. My former employer contacted me wondering what it would take to get me back, fortunately for me I had left a good enough impression with them and they still had a need for me. I went back and it was a truely good decision. had I not left profesionly this opportunity would not have existed.

    my $.02

    Edit: BTW I have been back for two weeks now.

  8. #8

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    nah where ill be working there making large commercial generators, wind generators and stuff of that nature. i guess there in large demand in India,china and Mexico.

    it still only a temporary job i want to have a career in law enforcement. i just got to finish up some school and a few other things. i would make a life long carer at ge but im afraid of the instability at this plant. i toped out at target at 19.75. at ge ill start at 25 ish maybe 26 top out is like 33 with out moving up. plus there are far better benefits.
    Last edited by stingray152003; 05-31-2008 at 10:35 AM.

  9. #9
    GE is huge, they have their hands into everything, financing is a big one for them also. just look who fronts the money for BRP and Yamaha credit.

    I wish you good luck and much success in your new job. looks like you were maxed out where you were.. so it`s sounds like a positive move!

  10. #10
    Dave Sharp dav_dman's Avatar
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    those are good wages, are you in maint?

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