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Thread: Safety at Home

  1. #1
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Exclamation Safety at Home

    Basic Home Personal Protective EquipmentPPE

    The majority of us work on our own skis and perform our own lawn care.
    The purpose of this thread is to discuss the importance of safety when at home.
    Many accidents happen at home when we are most complacent and impatient when performing task and duties.
    It only takes a split second to get something n your eye, cut off a finger, lacerate a limb or over time, lose your hearing. I am sure some of you ma have some stories to share about a home accident that could have been prevented.

    So, to all my forum peeps, please take the time to wear your PPE [Personal Protectve Equipment] when doing any tasks that involve noise, power tools, sharp devices or rotating equipment.
    Just like the old saying, "An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure"

    Here is some typical PPE you should have at home when doing lawn care, grinding on metal when working on our skis, dust from sanding, noise air tools ect.....

    They are all cheap and available at your local Home Depot, Autozone, Walmart, Lowe's, Sears, ect......

    GLOVES





    LATEX WORK GLOVES


    HEARING PROTECTION




    EYE PROTECTION



    RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

    Last edited by RX951; 07-10-2008 at 10:50 PM.


  2. #2

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    i had a grinder kick back and hit my hand a few years ago thank fully all im left with is a nice little scar. ever since then i wear gloves when i use it. i find as i have gotten older i tend to use more safety equipment.

  3. #3
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Electrical Home Safety

    Tick Tracer for identifying "hot" electrical circuits. Should be used to help determine if a circuit is hot after you trip the breaker.
    V.O.M. [Volt Ohm Meter]
    Used for measuring electrical circuits



    Last edited by RX951; 07-10-2008 at 11:33 AM.

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    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    And always remember to use the correct tool for the right job !
    Many accidents happen when we shortcut using the wrong tool.

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    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Safety Rules for Power Tools
    http://www.scif.com/safety/safetymee...p?ArticleID=93

    • Portable electric power tools are just what their name implies, power tools. Because they're powerful workers need to be aware of their limitations and potential hazards.
    • Use and maintain tools with care. Keep them sharp and clean for their best and safest performance. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for lubricating and changing tool accessories. Use the right tool for the job. Don't force a small tool or attachment to do the job of a heavy-duty tool. It overstrains the tool and overloads the motor. Keep guards in place and follow lockout/tagout procedures. Unless it's designed for it, never use a portable electric tool where there are flammable vapors or gases present.
    • If the tool is equipped with a three-prong plug, it should be plugged into a three-hold electrical receptacle. If an adapter is used to accommodate it to a two-prong receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known ground. Never remove the third prong.
    • Keep the cord in good condition. Keep it away from heat, oil, and sharp edges. Never carry a tool by its cord, or yank the cord to disconnect it from a receptacle and never carry a plug-in tool with your finger on the switch. Report any defective or broken plugs and insulation on cords. Take the tool out of service to be repaired or replaced.
    • The greatest hazard of power tools is electric shock, so make sure the tool is properly grounded before it's turned on. It's dangerous to use power tools in damp or wet locations or if the worker is perspiring. Moisture helps electricity flows more easily through the body. Rubber gloves and footwear are recommended when working outdoors where it's damp.
    • Wear proper clothing and personal protective equipment when working with power tools. Loose clothing or jewelry that can get caught in moving parts. Safety glasses or goggles can protect against flying particles or chips from entering the eye. Keep others out of the plane of rotation so they won't be hit by flying particles.
    • Keep your balance and proper footing when working with power tools, being careful not to overreach. When you've finished with the tool, put it down or store it so that it can't cause an injury to another worker. Keep the work area well lit and clean. Cluttered areas and benches invite accidents.

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    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Housekeeping Safety

    Housekeeping Rules This applies during and after you finished your projects. Please clean up after yourself.

    • And those are the basics - at least some of them. There are still a few other items to keep in mind. They fall under the category of housekeeping.
    • For example, it's always a good idea to keep the work area clean and organized. If you have a rag soaked with a flammable material on your work table, get rid of it. This is a good habit in general, but it's especially important if you're going to turn on a pieced of electric equipment. Sparks could fly and ignite the rag before you know what happened. It's also a good idea to clean up when you're done. Dust and debris only create additional hazards for someone else.
    • Housekeeping is also important with regard to storing your tools. Store sharp tools safely and use blade guards. Don't let cords dangle - they are major tripping hazards. Store bigger, heavier tools securely so they won't fall on anyone.
    • Most of this information is just good common sense. But if I didn't think it was important, I wouldn't be talking about it. Even if you feel like you know all of this stuff, I hope I at least reminded you to be careful with power tools. I don't want any of you to become accident statistics. And I know you don't either.

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    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Hand and Power Tool Safety

    good powerpoint
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #9
    Looking for a job gtxsc03's Avatar
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    Great thread, Billie. I for one have significant hearing loss from 10 years of racing stock cars without hearing protection. I've been to the opthamologist 3 times to remove debris from my eyes. I have scars from welding in t-shirt and shorts...
    While some people don't want to be told, safety-wise, what to wear or do, it is valuable to step back once in a while and evaluate what can be done to keep our selves intact and fully functioning...

    Thanks again

  10. #10
    All hail the Chief! fullboogie's Avatar
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    Great thread Billly Bob. Safety cannot be overstressed. I've personally witnessed too many accidents, and had too many happen to me, to ignore such an important subject.

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