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  1. #1
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Exclamation Hurricane Awareness

    We are in Hurricane Season. I know many of you live on the Gulf Coast and East Coast. Please take the time to make sure you are prepared. This includes:

    Insurance
    Emergency contacts
    Extra Gas Cans
    House procurements; window storm coverings; canned food
    Generator
    Medications
    Flashlight(s)
    Pets
    First Aid Kit(s)
    Family; kids, elderly
    Evacuation Route(s)
    Propane for cooking
    Hurricane Tracking Map
    Radio Batteries
    Digital camera for inventory reasons


    I'm sure you all can add more, this is just what comes to the top of my mind.

    Hurricane Definitions

    Hurricane Warning: A warning that sustained winds 64 kt (74 mph or 119 kph) or higher associated with a hurricane are expected in a specified coastal area in 24 hours or less. A hurricane warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and exceptionally high waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.

    Hurricane Watch: An announcement of specific coastal areas that a hurricane or an incipient hurricane condition poses a possible threat, generally within 36 hours.

    Tropical Storm Warning: A warning for tropical storm conditions including sustained winds within the range of 34 to 63 kt (39 to 73 mph or 63 to 118 kph) that are expected in a specified coastal area within 24 hours or less.

    Tropical Storm Watch: An announcement that a tropical storm poses or tropical storm conditions pose a threat to coastal areas generally within 36 hours. A tropical storm watch should normally not be issued if the system is forecast to attain hurricane strength.

    The links below will help you learn what to do when a watch or warning is issued. Even more important, they will help you prepare before the hurricane season begins. Those who wait until a watch or warning are issued to obtain supplies have generally waited too long.


    Here are some good website(s)
    http://www.redcross.org/news/ds/0305hurricane/

    http://www.hurricanesafety.org/home2.cfm

    http://www.weather.gov/os/hurricane/


    Tips

    High winds can bring costly damage to your property and pose a risk to your well-being. Here's a list of 10 hurricane safety tips, compiled from the landscaping perspective. Taking note of hurricane safety tips -- and acting in time -- can save you the costs of wind damage to your yard or home. Following hurricane safety tips can also save you the aggravation of having to replace items you take for granted in your yard. While some of these recommendations aren't technically hurricane safety tips, all are still well worth considering.

    Hurricane Safety Tips for Yards: Just Before the Storm

    1. Make sure shed doors are closed tightly: otherwise, they could end up blowing off their hinges and becoming dangerous projectiles.
    2. Bring in flags and awnings.
    3. Hurricane safety tips for your vehicle: don't park cars under trees (especially if you may be in the car when the storm strikes!).
    4. Firmly stake tall garden plants that could snap in high winds.
    5. Store lawn ornaments away, such as gazing balls. Not only is it a matter of saving the ornaments, but they can become dangerous projectiles in a storm!
    6. Remove house ornaments that are not secure, such as fall wreath displays.
    7. Check pool covers to ensure that they are secure.
    8. Harvest any fragile items in the garden that are mature enough to be picked, including flowers to be used for cut flower arrangements. There's no point in letting the storm wreck them.
    9. Remember that storms sometimes bring flooding in their wake, and that means potential erosion problems. If you live on a steep slope or close to a body of water, among the hurricane safety tips you must contemplate is evacuation (remain aware of what local authorities are recommending). In areas of your yard where water is known to pass through, remove any items of value.

    Be Proactive

    The best time to start dealing with a disaster is before it happens. Clear skies and happy days are when you should be preparing your disaster response. The first thing to do is record all of your possessions. A household inventory is a list, preferably with photographs, of everything in your home. It is also a good idea to photograph the outside of your home (all sides please) and your vehicles and toys.
    Last edited by RX951; 07-13-2008 at 05:43 PM.


  2. #2
    The ski's have taken a "backseat" to the Corvette DarthAWM's Avatar
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    Out here in West Texas we like Hurricane season.

    It means rain.

  3. #3
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Top Ten Hurricane Tips

    Top Ten Hurricane Tips
    http://www.chiff.com/a/hurricane-tips.htm

    Batten down the hatches!

    A hurricane's a comin'!

    What does that mean exactly? What are the necessary steps that should be taken for hurricane preparedness?

    Most things are usually on hand but should be stocked up and easily accessible. If it turns out the hurricane has changed its path, at least you will have known you were ready.

    If your city or town is in imminent danger of a hurricane, most likely evacuation announcements have been made, and should be taken seriously. Here is a checklist to consider before you leave:

    1. First, get important papers and special photos in order and secured in plastic. Identification is difficult and time-consuming to replace: so be sure to include social security cards, birth certificates, high school diplomas or GED certificates, titles or deeds to property. Photos of special occasions or loved ones cannot be replaced, so including these is important as well.

    2. Think ahead and take video or photos of your property before you leave. This will help later on with any insurance checklist claims for damage that may need to be filed.

    3. If staying with relatives is not an option, consider booking a room in a hotel or motel in another nearby town or state. Make sure to get directions and put them in the car ahead of time. It is easy to forget that piece of paper in the rush out the door. A cheaper route might be to find temporary hurricane shelters. Usually nearby towns not in the direct path of the hurricane will provide these for people in need.

    4. Unfortunately, it is unlikely that your pet will have a place in a motel or hotel. Keep this in mind and try to find alternate housing for your loved one until it is safe to return, or check out pet-friendly hotels in your area.

    5. Designate a spot, in the hall closet, to keep a bag of clothes for each person in the household. Make sure to include sleeping gear if you plan on going to a temporary shelter.

    6. Along with overnight clothes, consider stocking your Hurricane Kit with the following: extra cash, generator, batteries, flash lights, battery operated radio/television, bottled water, toilet paper, non-perishable foods such as cereal or crackers, canned goods, can opener, a small cooler, candles, prescription medicines and any over-the-counter remedies you use regularly; and if you have small children - diapers, baby wipes, formula, baby food.

    7. Count on the power being out for at least a day or two. Remember that ATM's will be non-operating, so have at least some hard cash in your Hurricane Kit (see no. 6, above) to see you through the storm.

    When TV and computer games no longer operate, board games or a deck of cards come in handy! Arts and crafts, crayons and downloadable coloring pages are always great distractions for the kids - so make sure you've stored some of these supplies in a tote bag or in the car trunk.

    8. If you decide to tough out the storm, stay downwind in your home. This means if the wind is hitting the living room windows, go to the room opposite the living room.

    9. Plywood is a 'hot' commodity for those of who decide to stay. Boarding up windows that will take the brunt of the wind and rain is the wisest decision. If board is not available, protect your windows from the wind by criss-crossing them with layers of duct or packing tape. This will be enough protection for light-to-medium winds, but learning how to build and install plywood hurricane shutters is your safest bet. If you can afford it, have them installed by a professional.

    10. Finally, STAY INSIDE. However tempting it may be to videotape or take photos of the storm, be sure to shoot from indoors - where it's safe, and dry!

    Hurricanes are serious business. Weather forecasters can only predict so much. Educate yourself and stay on top of weather updates in your area. There is no harm in being overly cautious. In most cases where a hurricane is concerned, it truly is better to be safe than sorry.
    Last edited by RX951; 07-14-2008 at 07:54 PM.

  4. #4
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Hurricane Preparation Tips

    Hurricane Preparation Tips
    http://www.dom.com/news/hurricane.jsp

    If you live in an area that has the potential of being affected by a hurricane, the key to remaining safe is early planning.

    Before the storm strikes --

    • Stock up on non-perishable food, medicine, baby supplies and pet food.
    • Purchase bottled water; 1 gallon of water per person per day.
    • Check emergency equipment (flashlights, battery-operated radios, extension cords, emergency generators, etc.) and purchase extra batteries.
    • Consider the installation of shutters over windows and doors. Depending on the design of your home, plywood works well, but stock up early.
    • Monitor official weather bulletins.
    • Keep extra cash on hand, as automatic teller machines or banks don't operate without power.
    • Review evacuation routes.
    • Arrange for safe sheltering for your pet if you must evacuate. Public shelters don't accept pets.
    • Keep your vehicle's fuel tank full.
    • Move yard items inside, such as patio furniture.
    • Read more tips on hurricanes, and learn about flash floods.
    • Electric Tips During Storms
    • If a family member uses life-sustaining medical equipment, develop an emergency plan for generating power or plan to relocate.
    • Turn off and unplug the electrical appliances and equipment such as TVs and computers.
    • Turn refrigerators and freezers to their coldest settings to keep food fresh as long as possible. (Learn more about perishable foods.)
    • Watch for downed power lines. Stay back and consider all lines energized. If possible, call Dominion at 1-888-667-3000. (Read more tips about downed wires and post-storm safety.)
    • If you must reset circuit breakers, wear dry, rubber soled shoes and stand on something dry such as wood or furniture.
    • Reset the breaker switches with one hand using a dry wooden tool. Don't touch the metal breaker box or other grounded objects.
    • If the breakers cannot be reset, call a licensed electrician, as there may be a short-circuit in the electrical system.
    • Portable Generator Safety Tips
    • Use only in a well-ventilated area. Don't run it in your garage.
    • Use a heavy duty, grounded extension cord when plugging appliances into the generator.
    • Do not connect your power generator to your home's main fuse box or circuit panel.
    • Don't exceed the generator's recommended wattage.
    • Turn the generator off at night while you sleep and when you are away from home.

  5. #5
    bugeater's Avatar
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    My sister was in Houston on business a couple of years ago when they evacuated the city. She had to drive a rental car from Houston to Arlington because the airport was closed. A normal 5 hour trip took over 26 hours.

    Based on her experience I'd recommend that you estimate how much food and water you would need for the trip then double that, at least. All the restaurants and gas stations along the route ran out of food, luckily they still had gas. Take food more substantial than chips. A good Samaritan at one of the gas stations gave her and her friend two roast beef sandwiches. She said they were the best sandwiches ever.

  6. #6
    Hydrotoys's Avatar
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    Not too soon to start thinking about it either...

    http://www.wunderground.com/tropical...894_model.html

  7. #7
    skipSC's Avatar
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    After 3 eyes passed over in 14 months, it's a ritual now. The key word is be prepared and do not assume anybody is going to help you.

  8. #8
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    To my local Floridians, if we have a weather event this year and you need help(fuel,drying equipment,food and water) please don't hesitate to let me know. I run one of the largest diaster relief companys in South Florida, I personally own a fleet of large generators, have 3000 Gallons of fuel on site, large dehumidifiers and other drying equipment & enough water and food to feed a army. This is NOT for sales post!!!! I have enough clients, this is for my local buddies that may run into trouble and might be in the need of some help..


    Alex Payne
    National Group
    954-905-4111 Ext# 26

  9. #9
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Awesome !!!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex13 View Post
    To my local Floridians, if we have a weather event this year and you need help(fuel,drying equipment,food and water) please don't hesitate to let me know. I run one of the largest diaster relief companys in South Florida, I personally own a fleet of large generators, have 3000 Gallons of fuel on site, large dehumidifiers and other drying equipment & enough water and food to feed a army. This is NOT for sales post!!!! I have enough clients, this is for my local buddies that may run into trouble and might be in the need of some help..


    Alex Payne
    National Group
    954-905-4111 Ext# 26

  10. #10
    Duke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex13 View Post
    To my local Floridians, if we have a weather event this year and you need help(fuel,drying equipment,food and water) please don't hesitate to let me know. I run one of the largest diaster relief companys in South Florida, I personally own a fleet of large generators, have 3000 Gallons of fuel on site, large dehumidifiers and other drying equipment & enough water and food to feed a army. This is NOT for sales post!!!! I have enough clients, this is for my local buddies that may run into trouble and might be in the need of some help..


    Alex Payne
    National Group
    954-905-4111 Ext# 26

    Thats awesome Alex!!

    2004 really sucked for us and many like myself went without power for over 7weeks combined in Brevard County that summer. I was lucky to have a pool and plenty of liquid chlorine.

    Had lots of work tho.

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