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  1. #1

    What do i need to make a static timing tool?

    I have a '99 SLTH 700 with problems, and after going through everything i could think of, as well as other expert advice, the last thing to do is the timing. I've just installed the ignition update kit, as the old cdi had a hole blown in it. The owner said it ran fine before the CDI went bad, which leads me to believe the timing should be fine as the flywheel looked good when it came off and nothing was loose or damaged, but i need to check it really. The problem is the manual calls for the engine to run @ 3000 rpm to test it, and my engine will not get up to that speed. It lists a tool, PN#2871745 to do a static test, but the picture of the tool looks very simple. Does anyone know what components i need? By the description of how to use it to test, i'm assuming it's just as simple as an LED connected between NEG and the trigger wire from the stator????? If this is the case, i can go to radioshack and make one in the morning. If it's a bit more technical than that, i would appreciate the input.


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Is this what you need?
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  3. #3
    That's exactly it, thank you

  4. #4
    The multimeter method is a complete PITA. I found a lov voltage LED in a container of " may come in handy one day " parts, and wired it in the same as the multimeter. Voila, one Hall effect tester. It's much easier to run a little LED you can put at the side of the dial indicator to get the exact measurement when it light's. Timing was a mile out, pulled it back to 18 BTDC and it burst into life all the way up the rev range. Thank god that's over, it was kicking my ass!!!!

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelby427uk View Post
    The multimeter method is a complete PITA.
    I found a low voltage LED in a container of "may come in handy one day" parts, and wired it in the same as the multimeter. Voila, one Hall effect tester.

    It's much easier to run a little LED you can put at the side of the dial indicator to get the exact measurement when it light's.

    Timing was a mile out, pulled it back to 18 BTDC and it burst into life all the way up the rev range.
    Thank god that's over, it was kicking my ass!!!!
    Glad you got it fixed!

    Could you post a diagram and photos of the LED tester you created, so others can replicate it?

    I would think if a multi-meter had a continuity test mode, which buzzes or beeps when the resistance drops, you could use that instead of ohms mode. Then you could listen for the Hall Effect trigger, rather than watching for it on the meter.
    Last edited by K447; 07-23-2008 at 11:38 PM.

  6. #6

    Cheap alternative to timing.

    The multimeter i use only gives the audible beep when @ 0 ohms, and the hall sensors do not go completely to ground, they hover around 20 - 30 ohms, so that was not an option for me. It also takes a while to react! I think an upgrade is in order! Anyway, attatched is a photo of what i put together, also good for those that do not want to spend the $300 on a good automotive Fluke, LED's are as cheap as chips. Youre basically connecting it in the exact same manner as the multimeter is in K477 's diagram that was nicely donated to me yesterday. I used only the Red wire ( Mag Cyl ) That is the only one to use for static timing. You can however use it to test the operation of all the hall sensors. 2 CYL models will have the exact same results 180 degrees apart (Green wire ) and 3 CYL models the difference will be every 120 degrees. 3 CYL's use a blue wire for the extra trigger. The LED i used was from a oil pressure warning light from a diesel power generator. It was only atually rated for 4 VDC, but i had to try it. I put it accross both terminals on the battery first without anything else connected to make sure it would be okay and not damage anything. I was in a bind! You can probably tell that by the manner in which it was put together! You don't alway's need the professional things to serve a purpose, i've learned that over the years! I cut the wires off the old CDI box so that the colors and connections were correct and then soldered them into the battery posts on the 9V.It worked perfectly. If you had the time and materials you could make a really good one for less than $2 at radioshack. A nice cheap alternative, especially when you have the same problem i did and the motor will not get up to 3000 RPM to time it properly.
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  7. #7
    Oh, and if you're using an older ski with the ignition update kit fitted, you'll need to use a late model manual. The wiring for the stator is different and you will not get the correct results. I used a 2002 Virage 700 manual. Same goes for troubleshooting of the ignition system, the older manuals will have all the wrong readings for the updated ignition ( Took me a little while before the penny dropped and i felt like a complete dumbass!! )

  8. #8
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Arrow Setting static Hall Effect stator timing with a home built LED light device

    Quote Originally Posted by shelby427uk View Post
    ...attached is a photo of what I put together...
    You're basically connecting it in the exact same manner as the multimeter is in K477's diagram that was nicely donated to me yesterday.
    I used only the Red wire (Mag Cyl). That is the only one to use for static timing.

    You can however use it to test the operation of all the hall sensors. 2 cylinder models will have the exact same results 180 degrees apart (Green wire) and 3 cylinder models the difference will be every 120 degrees. 3 CYL's use a blue wire for the extra trigger.

    The LED I used was from a oil pressure warning light from a diesel power generator. It was only actually rated for 4 VDC, but I had to try it. I put it across both terminals on the battery first without anything else connected to make sure it would be okay and not damage anything.

    ...I cut the wires off the old CDI box so that the colors and connections were correct and then soldered them into the battery posts on the 9V battery. It worked perfectly.

    If you had the time and materials you could make a really good one for less than $2 at Radio Shack.

    A nice cheap alternative, especially when you have the same problem I did and the motor will not get up to 3000 RPM to time it properly with a timing light.
    Quote Originally Posted by shelby427uk View Post
    ...If you're using an older ski with the ignition update kit fitted, you'll need to use a late model manual.

    The wiring for the updated stator is different and you will not get the correct results with the original service manual. I used a 2002 Virage 700 manual.

    Same goes for troubleshooting of the ignition system, the older manuals will have all the wrong readings for the updated ignition
    (Took me a little while before the penny dropped and I felt like a complete dumbass!)
    Excellent creative problem solving!

    Here are some step by step instructions for re-creating this LED static timing light for Hall Effect sensors.

    - Find an LED that can handle direct connection to a 9 volt battery, OR solder a resistor (about 100 ohms, give or take a lot) in series with one leg of a common low voltage LED.

    - Touch the LED legs (or resistor+LED combo) across the 9 volt battery, and figure out which polarity lights the LED. Mark the positive side of the LED.

    From here on, you can solder temporary wires, or use small alligator test clips, to connect things together

    - Connect the gray wire from the stator to the battery negative

    - Connect the positive (the marked side of the LED) to the battery positive, along with the Brown wire from the stator. This supplies 9 volt power to the Hall Effect sensor.

    - Connect the negative (unmarked) side of the LED to the RED stator wire (for timing the MAG cylinder).

    - When the trigger point on the flywheel passes the timing point, the Hall Effect sensor will ground the Red wire, turning the LED on.

    - To test the other two cylinders, connect the LED to the Blue (Center) or Green (PTO) wires instead of the Red wire.

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