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  1. #1
    Pistonwash's Avatar
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    Winterizing your ski?

    Since you Yankee boyz can't get out and go ski like us rednecks..I thought I'd offer a bot of advice for your winterizing this year.

    Remove your carburetors, drain them and put them into a box until next spring. Why? Becuaue if fuel/oil sit in your carbs over the winter, they develop gummy residue that eventually tear your diaphrams apart, the fuel will gum jets and make for hard starts at the beginning of your season. Moisture will intrude into your check valves and crease them.

    Thats why so many people have to take their skis into their local dealer in the spring who will charge them $200-$300 to clean their carbs after it sits their for 4 weeks.

    Prevention will save you time and money.


  2. #2
    DoktorC's Avatar
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    If you do end up with dirty carbs (and you're comfortable with taking them apart) the best thing I have seen to remove varnish/fuel deposits is Yamaha Penetrating Fluid. I've used this stuff for years and it is incredible. I use the cap off the can and put some in and soak all my jet for a few minutes and Viola..like new.

  3. #3
    mtrager's Avatar
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    Pistonwash

    If you turn off your fuel and run ski out of gas will that work?

  4. #4
    Pistonwash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtrager
    Pistonwash

    If you turn off your fuel and run ski out of gas will that work?
    No..not completely. Thats why I recommend taken them completely out, then you can inspect them and get them ready for the next season. Plus, you can spray down your crank real well through the intake mani.

    Remember to spray a good oil through the plug holes or remove the head and lube the walls real good. I ride year round so I don't worry about "winterizing" but I have had buddies from up north constantly call me about their skis not cranking or running at the beginning of the season.

    Carbs. Your ski's heart...take care of it.

  5. #5
    ramnj's Avatar
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    How do you check to make sure the carbs have no gasoline in them once they are removed from the ski? Do you have to remove the covers? Dumb question but I don't know.

  6. #6
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    This was written by the author Don Casey.
    Most of which applies to boats, but has some basic principals that we can still apply to our personal watercraft.


    Basics for Winterizing Your Engine
    by Don Casey

    Remember: Rust never sleeps !!


    Allowing corrosion to flourish during the off-season is less dramatic but equally destructive. Corrosion can establish a foothold on idle components, so liberal use of corrosion inhibitors--both internal and external--is a second guiding principle for winterizing.

    Prepare a checklist
    As with laying-up your boat for the season, it is essential not to miss a step. If your owner's manual includes winterizing instructions, that is the procedure you should follow. In the absence of manufacturer's instructions, here are two generic checklists for engine winterizing, one for outboards and one for inboards. Some steps on these lists may not apply to your particular engine.

    The only items you will need, other than your engine's normal lubricants are an aerosol can of fogging oil, a fuel stabilizer (gasoline engines) or a fuel biocide (diesel engines), and, for inboards, a gallon or two of non-toxic propylene glycol antifreeze.

    A stabilizer is unnecessary unless you expect to run the engine during the winter since the paraffin that precipitates out will be reabsorbed by the fuel when warm weather returns.

    Run engine out of fuel--gasoline engines only
    Shut off the fuel supply and let the engine run until it stops.

    Fog the intake--gasoline engines only
    While the engine is running, remove the flame arrestor and spray fogging oil into the air intake.
    Give it an extra heavy shot just as the engine starves and dies.

    Drain fuel tank and supply lines--gasoline engines only
    Adding stabilizer is an alternative but less effective way of avoiding engine problems in the spring resulting from stale gasoline.

    Flush raw-water circuit
    If you have a fresh-water flush connector, use it. Otherwise, close the intake seacock and disconnect the hose on the outlet side of the raw-water pump. Disconnect the cooling-water discharge hose from the exhaust manifold or riser. Run fresh water into the discharge hose to back-flush raw-water passages and rinse out salt deposits. You can extend the disconnected pump hose outside the boat or let the bilge pump handle the flush discharge.

    Protect raw-water passages--raw-water cooled diesel engines only
    The raw water circuit must be drained to prevent freezing, but air exposure promotes corrosion. Reconnect the water-pump outlet hose. Insert a funnel into the disconnected discharge hose and pour a 50-50 mix of propylene glycol antifreeze into the funnel until the hose will not accept more. Allow the mixture to remain inside the block for several minutes, then open all raw-water drain plugs and drain the engine. This treatment leaves behind a layer of corrosion protection on the water-jacket, and it freeze-protects any water that might be harbored in low spots inside the engine.
    This treatment is also applicable to protecting the heat exchanger on a fresh-water cooled engine.

    Remove raw-water impeller
    Antifreeze swells some rubbers, so rinse the extracted impeller as a precaution. Some grease the impeller and reinstall it. My preference is to leave it out until spring so the vanes don't take a set.

    Fog cylinders--gasoline engines only
    Remove the spark plugs and spray fogging oil into the holes. "Bump" the starter to spread the oil on the cylinder walls. Regap or replace plugs, as required, and reinstall.

    Fog intake
    Spray fogging oil into the intake manifold and turn the engine over slowly by hand to draw the oil into the cylinders and spread it. Do not use the starter, even with the stop control pulled out; the engine can start on the fogging oil.

    Drain muffler canister
    The less moisture the engine is exposed to, the less corrosion will occur.
    Degrease, derust, touch-up
    Maintain all painted surfaces to keep corrosion at bay.

    Grease control cables
    Extract control cables from their housings and coat them with grease. If you cannot remove them, tape an oil-filled bag tightly around the high end of the housing; the oil will work its way down the cable. Lubricate linkages and pivots.

    Coat unpainted parts with an anticorrosion spray
    Seal all engine and tank openings
    Keep moist air from getting inside your engine and tanks. Seal air inlets, crankcase and transmission breathers, exhaust outlets, and tank vents. Fabricate caps from plastic containers and tape them in place with plastic tape to create an airtight seal.

    References:
    http://www.capsante.com/Articles/how...ize_engine.htm
    http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/37.htm

  7. #7
    One day at a time..... N8R's Avatar
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    what if the ski is fuel injected?

  8. #8
    Moderator RX951's Avatar
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    Check these out

    http://www.dwfonline.com/winterize.htm

    Here is another one that mentions FI and 4 stroke winterizing

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/outd...tml?page=4&c=y

    Winterizing your Motor


    http://www.i4at.org/surv/winteriz.htm

  9. #9
    One day at a time..... N8R's Avatar
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    RX951 you are full of all kinds of good info once again thanks

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