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Thread: Fouling Plugs??

  1. #1

    Fouling Plugs??

    I have a friend with a 2006 F12X, that has just turned the 50 hour mark, and for some reason keeps fouling plugs. This first happened a couple of weeks ago, and yesterday morning, I pulled his old one's out, and installed a new set and found they were all looked to be running extremely rich, and on number three the gap was almost completely closed. We took it back out for a test run, and with a 5 minute ride, they did the same exact thing. Both of our ski's (mine is an 05 F12x with 130 hrs) have the Super Jim's alpha kit installed, and we have never had any issues like this. Everything seems to be hooked up the same, but still my buddies ski is running extremely rich. Could he have possibly broke a valve spring causing the valve to float?? Mabe hitting the top of number three plug and causing the gap to close?? Any feedback from the Honda guru's here would greatly be appreciated.


  2. #2
    spatera's Avatar
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    I'm not one of the gurus but If your valve spring were broke you would know something terrible was wrong. It wouldn't hit your plug but it would drop onto the piston. The valve and piston would be destroyed at the very least and it could get far worse. It sounds more like the piston is hitting the tip of the plug but again you should hear a lot of noise if the bearings or wrist pin were that bad to allow it to come that close. The piston is a dish type and I think the edges would hit the head before center hit the plug but something is closing the gap and you had better find out what before it gets catastrophic. If you want to see I can send pics of the piston and head and you'll see how much clearance there is. Could it be that he's dropping the plug with the socket and extension into the hole and its bending the tang. Once you figure the gap problem, the richness may be too much idle, poor gas, clogged injectors.

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    JRINJAX's Avatar
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    Put some Seafoam in the gas and see if that helps. I run it a couple of time a year and never have any plug trouble.

  4. #4
    spatera's Avatar
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    I use seafoam all the time. Not saying thats wise but I run about 17-19 psi and like the way the SKI runs with it.

  5. #5
    Vern's Avatar
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    Oil in airbox

    I had a friend with a non-turbo Honda that would foul the rear plug very regularly. We would pull the plugs, clean them, and the rear plug always looked dark and oily. Off-season, I took his ski apart a little and found the problem ... it was oil. The stock airbox has PCV type venting into it and over time oil would build up in the airbox. Due to the way the airbox is constructed, along with forward motion, most of the oil ended up in the rear of the airbox, and eventually would get sucked into the rear cylinder and foul the plug. There are many 'backyard solutions' to this, but he chose to drill a hole at the lowest point and added a fitting and hose to allow the oil to drain into a pop bottle zip tied in the bottom of the hull. Cheesy but effective and no more fouled plugs for him.

    I have not looked at a turbo Honda, so am not sure how similar they are, but do yourself a favor and open up your airbox and check for oil in there.

  6. #6
    NV 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vern View Post
    I had a friend with a non-turbo Honda that would foul the rear plug very regularly. We would pull the plugs, clean them, and the rear plug always looked dark and oily. Off-season, I took his ski apart a little and found the problem ... it was oil. The stock airbox has PCV type venting into it and over time oil would build up in the airbox. Due to the way the airbox is constructed, along with forward motion, most of the oil ended up in the rear of the airbox, and eventually would get sucked into the rear cylinder and foul the plug. There are many 'backyard solutions' to this, but he chose to drill a hole at the lowest point and added a fitting and hose to allow the oil to drain into a pop bottle zip tied in the bottom of the hull. Cheesy but effective and no more fouled plugs for him.

    I have not looked at a turbo Honda, so am not sure how similar they are, but do yourself a favor and open up your airbox and check for oil in there.
    That could have been due to overfilling the oil!

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