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  1. #1
    krispaintballz's Avatar
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    Spark plug views.....

    So i was looking in some archives and they were saying the 2001 gpr was running BPR8ES instead of BR8ES. I know they were running the MSD ignitions and were saying that BPR8ES responded better to high octane fuel because it was a slightly colder plug. Now I thought since they are both 8, they are the same heat index???? I ask these questions because I wanted to try out different plugs in the summer, like the standard BR8ES against the BPR8ES, and the platinum, and the iridium style plugs. Old school guys who are running high compression and triples what are you guys running?


  2. #2
    Stop staring at my tits NJJer's Avatar
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    Kris,

    The difference in those 2 plugs is the "P" designation. "P" meaning projected tip.

    Right now I don't have my NGK book with me. If I did I could tell you exactly what the physical differences are in them. IIRC the "P" plug will be too long and may smack a piston.

    Don't take this as Gospel, I am not sure right now.

    Contact NGK and they will send you out a new plug book if you ask them. Just say it is for your business and they will be happy to send one out to you.

    Inside the book it will tell you what each and every letter/number means and plenty of cross references too.

    Edit: I am running NGK Palladium plugs in my 61X

  3. #3
    krispaintballz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJJer View Post
    Kris,

    The difference in those 2 plugs is the "P" designation. "P" meaning projected tip.

    Right now I don't have my NGK book with me. If I did I could tell you exactly what the physical differences are in them. IIRC the "P" plug will be too long and may smack a piston.

    Don't take this as Gospel, I am not sure right now.

    Contact NGK and they will send you out a new plug book if you ask them. Just say it is for your business and they will be happy to send one out to you.

    Inside the book it will tell you what each and every letter/number means and plenty of cross references too.

    Edit: I am running NGK Palladium plugs in my 61X
    I was going to go that direction this summer too. How does iridium plugs compare to the platinum plugs. Note i am running the riva ignition and not a msd.

  4. #4
    Stop staring at my tits NJJer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krispaintballz View Post
    I was going to go that direction this summer too. How does iridium plugs compare to the platinum plugs. Note i am running the riva ignition and not a msd.
    Spark plugs, their use, performance, and longevity are a "huge" topic to discuss.

    Everyone has their own opinion, this is just mine. Use what you deem best.

    Short version and my 2 cents-

    The harder the electrode, the harder it is to get a spark. Spark likes a "soft" material to jump from/too. When plug wears, it gets harder. This is why when you look closely at a used plug you will see wear on not just one spot on the positive or negative electrode. (wear making the positive electrode "rounded over")

    For an MSD type ignition, Copper is the way to go. It is "soft" and will let the MSD fire more rapidly. That is until a certain RPM as it no longer fires multiple times after a certain RPM.

    Is your Riva Ign. a multiple spark system?

    A few types of plugs and short details on each-


    Copper- If you want a plug that fires and will fire, copper is it. Copper is soft and spark will fire easier with a softer electrode. (use these in my street cars and just change them out every 15k) Too cheap not too
    Copper is the answer when you have high cylinder pressures. (High Comp., Turbo, Supercharger, N20)



    Platinum- Long lasting and the fine wire does fire easier when new. When they get older, they still last, yet are harder to fire. (used by OEMs today to cut down on required labor costs.)

    Iridium- A "better" Platinum. Harder, lasts longer, but when gets some age on it, gets very hard to fire.
    *Never want to use these in high cylinder pressures* Been know to break off and the IR tip wreaks havoc with the pistons/cylinder walls.


    Palladium- My plug of choice for my skis.
    The tips is actually Gold, but is mixed with Palladium as Gold is too soft a metal by itself for a tip.
    Has the best qualities of Copper and IR, yet will last a decent amount of time due to the "mix" used.
    (hard to find, and not even sure they are even being made any longer)
    (Also was like $15-20 per plug back in 94. Today $5-10 if you can find them)



    ***At my job, we use Copper plugs only. Whether they are just plain Copper or "Race" plugs.
    We also modify the ground strap at times on the regular Copper plugs.
    Mind you, the engines I work with are not these "little" 2 and 4 strokes, they are race car engines. 200++HP a hole is normal in the shop. ***

    Never use anti-seize. Can cause misfires. Tq properly and only use what the plug manufacturer says to use on the threads sparingly!

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