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  1. #1
    Rampage's Avatar
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    This thing is AMAZING

    324156542315432165846321*665420321564231654341 =
    215 tredecillion, 700 duodecillion, 350 undecillion, 624 decillion, 684 nonillion, 337 octillion, 187 septillion, 278 sextillion, 818 quintillion, 78 quadrillion, 875 trillion, 376 billion, 198 million, 529 thousand and 461.

    Yea, thats right...I AM a genius!!


    Naw...not really. Check out this amazing website. It is ran by a supercomputer and its just unreal. It knows the exact day of almost any date...I put in like March 5, 750 and it knew the day...its CRAZY!
    http://www.wolframalpha.com/ HAVE FUN


  2. #2
    All hail the Chief! fullboogie's Avatar
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    Aren't there retarded people who can do the same thing? Savants? Not impressed...

  3. #3
    Moderator Franko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullboogie View Post
    Aren't there retarded people who can do the same thing? Savants? Not impressed...
    LOL. Politically incorrect as hell, but funny.

  4. #4
    Yeah. rain man.

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rampage View Post
    Thanks for the link!

    I had not seen this one before.

    The tricky thing with these 'Answer systems' is that sometimes, unexpectedly, it will give an incorrect answer. The trouble is, you may not know when it has done so.

    Even a long streak of correct results, doesn't mean the next answer will also be correct. And the error can be subtle, not necessarily obvious.

    Your example of an ancient date was interesting. I tried 5 October 1582

    From Wikipedia;
    "Accordingly, when the new calendar was put in use, the error accumulated in the 13 centuries since the Council of Nicaea was corrected by a deletion of ten days. The last day of the Julian calendar was Thursday, 4 October 1582 and this was followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar, Friday, 15 October 1582 (the cycle of weekdays was not affected)."

    There is no such thing as Friday 5 October 1582, in either calendar system.

    The answer from Wolfram|Alpha was incorrect. No mention of the calendar shift.

    Here is some more of the information presented - do you trust it?



  6. #6
    Rampage's Avatar
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    hmmmm...thats interesting, it just launched last friday, so its still in an early stage.

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info, donation request K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    ...The tricky thing with these 'Answer systems' is that sometimes, unexpectedly, it will give an incorrect answer. The trouble is, you may not know when it has done so...
    Quote Originally Posted by Rampage View Post
    hmmmm...thats interesting,

    it just launched last Friday, so its still in an early stage.
    Even after it has been running for a long time, the 'potential wrong answer' problem will persist.

    An example given in the introductory video raises questions. The example question was France fish production.

    It gave an answer in metric tons per year, with a comparison to New York garbage production. What good that is, I don't know

    Further, there is no link to the source(s) for the data. No mention of whether that is for fish taken from French waters, or fish taken from international waters by the French fishing fleet. Does it include fish from French colonies?

    The data is presented in two formats. Near the bottom, it is formatted in the European style, with a space separating the thousands. Higher up, it is in the North American style, with a decimal point.

    And it converts the fish production rate to slugs per second. Which is again compared to New York garbage production.

    It really seems like the data within the Wolfram|Alpha system is limited. These answer systems tend to provide answers based only on what information they have on hand.

    What they don't know, they don't know. Seems obvious, but it is critical.

    More importantly, they often don't realize what they don't know. They typically won't (or can't) tell you when the answer is based on incorrect or insufficient data.

    Amusingly, it does't know much about itself

    Don't take my criticism the wrong way. These things can be very impressive, and with relevant enough data inside, they can even be useful.

    You just need to know a little about how they produce the answers they do, and be prepared to distrust and cross check any answer that you need to be correct.

  8. #8
    Rampage's Avatar
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    Useless information I can see being inaccurate, but the math/science/chem parts I would have to say would be dead on.

  9. #9
    83Gator's Avatar
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    Calendars...

    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Thanks for the link!

    I had not seen this one before.

    The tricky thing with these 'Answer systems' is that sometimes, unexpectedly, it will give an incorrect answer. The trouble is, you may not know when it has done so.

    Even a long streak of correct results, doesn't mean the next answer will also be correct. And the error can be subtle, not necessarily obvious.

    Your example of an ancient date was interesting. I tried 5 October 1582

    From Wikipedia;
    "Accordingly, when the new calendar was put in use, the error accumulated in the 13 centuries since the Council of Nicaea was corrected by a deletion of ten days. The last day of the Julian calendar was Thursday, 4 October 1582 and this was followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar, Friday, 15 October 1582 (the cycle of weekdays was not affected)."

    There is no such thing as Friday 5 October 1582, in either calendar system.

    The answer from Wolfram|Alpha was incorrect. No mention of the calendar shift.

    Here is some more of the information presented - do you trust it?


    Can anyone comment on this? A few years ago I was reading an article about calendars and I seem to remember that the author stated that we only need 11 annual calendars for the rest of our lives. I guess I could have Snoped/Googled the issue but was too lazy. He went on to discuss how the cycle repeats itself after the n year (could have been 12 or 13, I don't rem. So, if June 18, 2009 was a Monday, then it would reoccur again in 2020. And the same would be true for every date on the calendar in that 11/12/13 year cycle. All you would have to do is change the year of the calendar to read the current year.

  10. #10
    lextoy's Avatar
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    TUESDAY...

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