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  1. #1
    Gforce's Avatar
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    Pump Bolts Corroding....

    The bolts on my pump aren't looking too good. The bolts don't look too bad themselves but while trying to work on the pump today the 4 bolts that go into the pump shoe came out a little rough and 2 of the 4 on the part where the nozzle bolts on snapped trying to get them out.

    I'm gonna try to TIG weld some nuts on the broken ones to get them out but What can I do to stop the corrosion from getting any worse?? I'm just glad none of the bolts broke off in the pump shoe at this point but I could see it happening next time.

    Just to clarify it seems more like the aluminum that is starting to corrode and stick the bolts than it does the Stainless Bolts.


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gforce View Post
    The bolts on my pump aren't looking too good. The bolts don't look too bad themselves but while trying to work on the pump today the 4 bolts that go into the pump shoe came out a little rough and 2 of the 4 on the part where the nozzle bolts on snapped trying to get them out.

    I'm gonna try to TIG weld some nuts on the broken ones to get them out but What can I do to stop the corrosion from getting any worse?? I'm just glad none of the bolts broke off in the pump shoe at this point but I could see it happening next time.

    Just to clarify it seems more like the aluminum that is starting to corrode and stick the bolts than it does the Stainless Bolts.

    Replace all the bolts with a higher grade bolt and just keep an eye on the corrision

  3. #3

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    Part of the problem is that the bolts go all the way thru the aluminum and project past water can seep in from the back and allows junk to form. I usually coat the bolt with never sieze or grease which keeps the aluminum from corroding - I have not had a problem with them coming loose.

  4. #4
    AKA: Larry lafjax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gforce View Post
    The bolts on my pump aren't looking too good.
    After every ride I spray the pump area down with seadoo lube or Fluid Film. Keeps the corosion at bay.

  5. #5
    Hydrotoys's Avatar
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    How does your zinc anodes look like on your ride plate and pump housing? If these get wore out, then the process goes much faster.

  6. #6
    TEX-X's Avatar
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    sempen the heads of the bolts....that'll keep it at bay....aluminum and steel together are never a good thing. galvanic corrosion is a b*tch

  7. #7
    GTXX's Avatar
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    Blue Loctite also serves as an anti-seize and won't wash away if you give it a day to dry before getting it wet. get the bottle that has an ounce or so in it, the tip is long enough to reach all of the internal threads.

  8. #8
    TEX-X's Avatar
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    This should help you out....

    good tidbits of info on it... it's an aircraft publication but it applies to Skis

    3-9.2. GALVANIC CORROSION. Galvanic corrosion
    occurs when different metals are in contact with each
    other and an electrolyte, such as sea water. It is usually
    recognizable by the presence of a buildup of corrosion
    deposits at the joint between the metals. For example,
    aluminum skin panels and stainless steel doublers,
    riveted together in an aircraft wing, form a galvanic
    couple if moisture and contamination are present.
    Figure 3-8 shows galvanic corrosion of magnesium
    adjacent to steel fasteners. The potential for galvanic
    corrosion is greatest when the two metals are well
    separated from each other in the galvanic series (see
    Figure 3-4) and are in electrical contact.

    3-10.1. ALUMINUM. Aluminum and aluminum alloys
    are the most widely used materials for aircraft
    construction. In addition to its uses in aircraft structure,
    aluminum and aluminum alloys are widely used in
    equipment housings, chassis, mounting racks,
    supports, frames and electrical connector shells.
    Aluminum is highly anodic, as evidenced by its position
    in the galvanic series table. It is anodic to most other
    metals, and, when in contact with them, galvanic
    corrosion of the aluminum will occur. Aluminum alloys
    are subject to pitting, intergranular corrosion, and
    stress corrosion cracking. In some cases, the corrosion
    products of a metal in contact with aluminum are
    corrosive to aluminum. However, the formation of a
    tightly adhering oxide film offers increased resistance
    under mild corrosive conditions. The corrosion product
    of aluminum is a white to gray powdery material
    (aluminum oxide or hydroxide) which can be removed
    by mechanical polishing or brushing with abrasives
    (Figure 3-23). Therefore, it is necessary to clean and
    protect aluminum and its alloys against corrosion.
    Since pure aluminum is more corrosion resistant than
    most alloys, aluminum sheet stock is often covered
    with a thin layer of nearly pure aluminum called cladding
    or alclad. However, in a marine environment, all
    aluminum surfaces require protection. Cladding is
    easily removed by harsh treatment with abrasives and
    tooling, exposing the more corrodible alloy surface.
    Chemical conversion coating, paints, and corrosion
    preventive compounds are the main methods

    STAINLESS or corrosion resistant steels (as they are more properly
    described) are alloys of iron containing large amounts
    of chromium and nickel. Stainless steels are used for
    gears, bearings, and high strength bolts, and for
    mountings, racks, brackets, and hardware in avionic
    systems. The main reason for the existence of stainless
    steels is their resistance to corrosion. Stainless steels
    are much more resistant to common rusting, chemical
    action, and high temperature oxidation than ordinary
    steels, due to the formation of an invisible oxide film, or
    passive layer, on the surface of these alloys. Corrosion
    and heat resistance are the major factors in selecting
    stainless steels for a specific application. However, it
    should be well understood that stainless steels are not
    the cure-all for all corrosion problems, due to service
    conditions which can destroy the oxide film on their
    surfaces. Stainless steels are susceptible to crevice
    corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in moist, salt
    laden environments. Exposure to saltwater can cause
    pitting. The corrosion product of stainless steel is a
    roughened surface with a red, brown, or black stain.
    Corrosion treatment of stainless steel should be limited
    to cleaning. Stainless steels can cause galvanic
    corrosion of almost any other metal with which they are
    in contact if proper techniques of sealing and protective
    coating are not used. Stainless steels may be magnetic
    or non-magnetic. The magnetic steels are identified by
    numbers in the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI)
    400 Series (e.g. 410, 430). These steels are not as
    corrosion resistant as the non-magnetic steels, which
    are identified by numbers in the AISI 300 Series (e

    2-3. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE.
    The two most
    important factors in preventing corrosion, and the only
    ones which can be controlled by field personnel, are the
    removal of the electrolyte and the application of protective
    coatings. Since the extent of corrosion depends on the
    length of time electrolytes are in contact with metals,
    aircraft corrosion can be minimized by frequent washing.
    If noncorrosive cleaners are used, the more frequently
    a surface is cleaned in a corrosive environment the less
    the possibility of corrosive attack. In addition, by
    maintaining chemical treatments and paint finishes in
    good condition, corrosion can be minimized. The
    degradation of non-metallic materials can be minimized
    by avoiding the use of unauthorized maintenance
    chemicals and procedures. In addition, when repair or
    replacement of non-metallic materials is required, only
    approved materials shall be used. Dedication to proper
    preventive maintenance practices maximizes equipment

    reliability.

  9. #9
    SeaGoat's Avatar
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    I just pulled mine today to change the prop and there was a little corrosion on all of the bolts. I cleaned them up and sprayed them with Boeshield which is similar to fluid film and used blue locktite to install them. Then I sprayed everything down with some more Boeshield. You just have to keep after it when riding saltwater.

  10. #10
    Its common. I just broke two of mine this week even after a little heat. they suck. just replace them with better hardware and try to use some sort of anti-seize product.

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