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Recommendation to replace the 4.80 x 12 tires and wheels

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  • guybb3
    replied
    Originally posted by tractng
    When my 4.80 x 12 wear out, I am going to do 5.30 x 12. Guybb3, what did you end up with?
    Going with the ST145 radials @ the end of the season

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  • tractng
    replied
    When my 4.80 x 12 wear out, I am going to do 5.30 x 12. Guybb3, what did you end up with?

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  • guybb3
    replied
    I can't thank all you guys enough for all the info in this thread!

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  • K447
    replied
    Originally posted by conroe
    … the same tire flexing going around a curve, or hitting a curb?
    … car tire can be inflated to 50 lbs.

    … If your axle is aligned correctly, it will always track.
    Trailer tires do not follow the same paths as the tow vehicle tires. Often the tire track width is different for the trailer compared to the tow vehicle. When turning the trailer tires will track tighter to the inside of the turn. The trailer tire may contact road obstacles or curbs that the tow vehicle does not.

    ST tires tend to have tougher sidewalls, better able to shrug off sidewall strikes.

    Highway towing on a smooth road at legal speeds is not the most difficult stress test for a trailer tire.
    Well, not when the trailer tire is properly inflated, load rated and operating within the tire’s speed rating.

    Think about moments when the trailer tire drifts onto the highway shoulder, running over debris and whatever.

    When reversing, the trailer tires may run into or over curb corners, unnoticed debris, grind along an edge, all sorts of weird things.

    Trailer suspensions tend to be rudimentary. The most basic possible. The tire itself comprises a significant portion of the overall suspension, including sidewall flex, wheel oscillation damping, tread directionality.

    Trailer axles may (or may not) be exactly aligned with the trailer centerline when new. Over time the trailer and the axle may become less ‘aligned’ as the trailer tires encounter immovable objects, oopsies . The trailer tires just have to live with it.

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  • conroe
    replied
    Originally posted by K447
    On trailers, tall and tough sidewalls are a positive. Tall sidewalls can provide better resistance to tire (and wheel rim) damage from curb strikes, pothole impacts, and other road insults.

    ST tires generally provide somewhat stiff and robust sidewalls, which further toughen the tire in the face of adversity.

    The relatively high tire sidewall pressure allows ST tires to further defend themselves during impact events.

    ST tires also often have a solid center rib in the tread that improves trailer tracking behind the tow vehicle.

    Radial trailer tires do tent to ride better and have less rolling resistance, so less trailer bounce, less tire self-heating and less fuel consumption.
    This is for discussion only. Sometimes I wonder why. What is the difference of a 2,000 lb. car, compared to a 2,000 lb. jet ski trailer going down the highway at 70 miles per hour. Wont you get the same tire flexing going around a curve, or hitting a curb? The right car tire can be inflated to 50 lbs. and can cruise down the highway at 80 miles per hour. You have more choices with car tire sizes. Same amount of ply's Trailer tracking-- If your axel is aligned correctly, it will always track.

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  • K447
    replied
    Originally posted by conroe
    … a tire with less side wall. … wheel barrel tires.
    On trailers, tall and tough sidewalls are a positive. Tall sidewalls can provide better resistance to tire (and wheel rim) damage from curb strikes, pothole impacts, and other road insults.

    ST tires generally provide somewhat stiff and robust sidewalls, which further toughen the tire in the face of adversity.

    The relatively high tire sidewall pressure allows ST tires to further defend themselves during impact events.

    ST tires also often have a solid center rib in the tread that improves trailer tracking behind the tow vehicle.

    Radial trailer tires do tent to ride better and have less rolling resistance, so less trailer bounce, less tire self-heating and less fuel consumption.

    Leave a comment:


  • guybb3
    replied
    Originally posted by conroe
    Did some checking. You could also go with a 15" wheel. Use a tire with less side wall. for instance, a 175/55R15 tire has a diameter of 22.6" .This tire can be used on a 6" wide rim. Lots of wheel choices. Don't be stuck with wheel barrel tires.
    I have to tell you, all the choices are daunting. The one thing I know is I want radials going forward.

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  • conroe
    replied
    Did some checking. You could also go with a 15" wheel. Use a tire with less side wall. for instance, a 175/55R15 tire has a diameter of 22.6" .This tire can be used on a 6" wide rim. Lots of wheel choices. Don't be stuck with wheel barrel tires.

    Leave a comment:


  • guybb3
    replied
    Guys I REALLY appreciate all the advice and experience I'm getting from everyone. Thank you!!

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  • conroe
    replied
    Originally posted by K447
    After trailering on a rough road or the trailer having ridden over some hard wheel jounces, check the undersides of the plastic fenders for signs of tread contact with the fender inside
    The tire size that I stated, are the same diameter as stock.

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  • K447
    replied
    Originally posted by conroe
    14" rims, 5X4.5 tires-175/70R14
    Did not modify fenders
    After trailering on a rough road or the trailer having ridden over some hard wheel jounces, check the undersides of the plastic fenders for signs of tread contact with the fender inside

    Leave a comment:


  • conroe
    replied
    Forgot to include, they are radials

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  • conroe
    replied
    14" rims, 5X4.5 tires-175/70R14 Did not modify fenders
    Attached Files

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  • guybb3
    replied
    Originally posted by K447
    Good tip for others who may encounter this thread later:
    Remove the fenders so you can properly evaluate whether all three portions of the axle are correctly aligned and the wheels really are tracking straight.
    Awesome advice as I could see the bend plain as day when I removed the fender. Not so much with the fender still attached.

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  • K447
    replied
    Originally posted by guybb3
    the axle was not misaligned. … the end was definitely bent back. I could see it plain as day when I took the fender off and looked straight down.

    So you guys were all right!! It really was a misalignment problem just not what i thought it was.

    The two tires are fighting each other going down the road. …
    For these simple trailers, there are, in a manner of speaking, three axles. The big structural section that bolts to the trailer frame and extends across the frame. There are also two stub axles, one on each end of the ‘axle’ structure.

    It is the stub axles that are prone to being bent by road impacts, curb strikes, other road insults. Even a small bend of a stub axle can be enough to increase tire wear and reduce tread life, Depending on how it is bent one or both trailer tires may wear in an unusual pattern, or just seem to wear at an accelerated rate but otherwise look ‘fairly normal’.

    When checking an axle for bending, all three axles must be in alignment with the trailer frame. The center section and each stub axle.

    Stub axle may be bent rearwards or bent upwards, or some of each. Vertically bent can be harder to judge as many axles have a mild camber built into the axle design. The idea is that when unloaded the tires are angled inwards slightly at the bottom. As the trailer is loaded with weight the axle design flexes just enough that the tires end up being vertical to the road surface.

    Good to hear you have now identified the root problem for this trailer!

    Good tip for others who may encounter this thread later:
    Remove the fenders so you can properly evaluate whether all three portions of the axle are correctly aligned and the wheels really are tracking straight.

    Leave a comment:

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